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 11 
 on: Today at 12:44:35 PM 
Started by Here to stay - Last post by Jim Kasson
Take a lens, and make resolution tests with finer and finer pixel pitches until, say, the MTF10 in cy/ph stops changing. Then say that the number of pixels on the sensor just before the MTF10 stopped changing is the pixel resolving power of the lens.

It occurs to me that, since this method results in asymptotically approaching a certain cy/ph, you could argue that it never actually converges. That would be pedantic. But it certainly would be true to say that the answer you get depends entirely on what you decide is an inconsequential improvement.

Jim

 12 
 on: Today at 12:44:21 PM 
Started by dreed - Last post by summit68
Anybody ever do similar testing with Imageprint, or happen to know how Imageprint interpolates? I've always been impressed with their output, no matter the resolution I send, but have never done testing.

 13 
 on: Today at 12:42:41 PM 
Started by M+D - Last post by M+D
bidding at $2800.

 14 
 on: Today at 12:38:36 PM 
Started by bcooter - Last post by MrSmith
Nice shots.
I'm really curious what grinder that is?

Best,

Mitchell

It's an HG-one. Very much a coffee geek thing as the burrs are huge and it's the most expensive hand grinder you can buy, the idea being that the slower speed means no heat getting into the grinds, it's a lovely object and beautifully machined but I prefer the arm work to be done by an electric motor.

 15 
 on: Today at 12:28:27 PM 
Started by RDEdwards - Last post by RDEdwards
How old is the printer, and how many prints have gone through it?

It is 3 years old and I am not sure how many prints I have made, but I doubt if I've reached its limit.

This problem comes and goes. Today I printed about 6 prints, and it was fine, and then it started again.

Durwood

 16 
 on: Today at 12:26:20 PM 
Started by RDEdwards - Last post by RDEdwards

Changing the platen gap setting from standard to wide did the trick for me.

Best of luck
Gerry

It made no difference, but THANKS

 17 
 on: Today at 12:20:41 PM 
Started by torger - Last post by ErikKaffehr


In Sweden it is actually OK to import things if they have been used. For instance, a colleague of mine bought a golf set in the US and was stopped in customs, but they found a piece of grass on one of those clubs, so it was no issue.

But even if you pay all legal fees it would be 4000$ cheaper than when bought here.

Best regards
Erik


Don't you guys have import duties/ taxes to pay? Or are you all planning to smuggle them into your countries?

 18 
 on: Today at 12:19:34 PM 
Started by Here to stay - Last post by Jim Kasson
That is true for lenses with brass helicoid manual focusing mechanisms like Leica and Zeiss, but not necessarily true for autofocusing or vibration reduction (image stabilization) lenses. A friend and I have both experienced US$500 repair bills for our Nikon 70-200 f/2.8 VR1 lenses. Neither were subjected to any impact damage or extraordinary use.

Good point, Bill. Then there's obsolescence. A good lens stays good judged by the standards of the day it was designed, but standards change over time. I got rid of almost all my Hasselblad V-series lenses when the H=series came out. (I kept the 500, even though it's not very sharp, and the 250 APO, which is pretty sharp.) In fact, aside from view camera lenses and the 50mm f/2 that's on my Nikon S2, those are the oldest lenses I own.

Another thing to consider. When you buy a sharp lens, you've got a sharp lens that will be useful for many years. When you buy a hi-res body, all the lenses you own (except for some zooms) get better.

Jim

 19 
 on: Today at 12:15:42 PM 
Started by Here to stay - Last post by ErikKaffehr
Hi,

I would say that Bill is right, on the other hand I have something like 20 lenses, some as old as from 1985, all AF and no real failures on any lens.

But, generally the more complex something is the more probable it is that it will break sooner or lighter. I don't think plastic materials are bad, BTW, if the plastic used is of good quality.

Best regards
Erik

That is true for lenses with brass helicoid manual focusing mechanisms like Leica and Zeiss, but not necessarily true for autofocusing or vibration reduction (image stabilization) lenses. A friend and I have both experienced US$500 repair bills for our Nikon 70-200 f/2.8 VR1 lenses. Neither were subjected to any impact damage or extraordinary use.

Bill

 20 
 on: Today at 12:02:56 PM 
Started by Here to stay - Last post by bjanes
Modern lenses will last many generations of camera bodies to come, so there is less of a need to upgrade, unless for replacing a dud. Of course lens manufacturers will think of other features to incorporate in lenses, like autofocus improvements, which will only work together with the newest generation of bodies, but 'built-in obsolescence' or forced upgrading/replacement is a way of survival for those companies.

That is true for lenses with brass helicoid manual focusing mechanisms like Leica and Zeiss, but not necessarily true for autofocusing or vibration reduction (image stabilization) lenses. A friend and I have both experienced US$500 repair bills for our Nikon 70-200 f/2.8 VR1 lenses. Neither were subjected to any impact damage or extraordinary use.

Bill

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