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Author Topic: cinema display calibrating  (Read 3493 times)
yodelyo
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« on: February 04, 2006, 08:10:19 PM »
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hi..i am getting mixed answers between monaco tech support and some color management "experts". I will ask two questions:

1. when calibrating my apple cinema display, do I only calibrate for "color" or can i do both "color and contrast/brightness"?

2. Once I finish calibrating do I go to my system preferences and choose monitor and then select my title for the calibration I just created or do i choose Adobe 1998 RGB, the color space I work in?

Thanks...I am really confused!
Chris
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61Dynamic
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« Reply #1 on: February 05, 2006, 01:27:08 AM »
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1. You calibrate for the brightness and then let the Manaco build a profile after that. You may notice that the display only had brightness controls. There is no way you can adjust contrast or color.

In the manaco software set gamma to 2.2 and white point to 6500K and calibrate the luminance (brightness) to 120cd/m2. The manaco should do the rest and ignore any prompts to adjust contrast or RGB settings.

2. You do nothing. The calibration software should set the profile it just made as the system default automatically. If not, then you need to choose the profile you just made in system preferences.

AdobeRGB is an editing space and has nothing to do with your display. If you set the display to ARGB, then all the time you spent making a profile with the Manaco was wasted. The point in the profile for your display it to compensate for the characteristics of the display. Photoshop will then use that information to translate the AdobeRGB values of the image you are editing so they will render on your monitor as accurately as possible.
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yodelyo
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« Reply #2 on: February 05, 2006, 09:31:54 AM »
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thank you so much......that makes perfect sense.

about the contrast control: if my only control is to adjust brightness on my monitor, what is recomended; dim, about halfway, or brightest?
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francois
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« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2006, 10:47:12 AM »
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You must set it at 120cd/m2. On an Apple 20" Cinema Display it's about 3 or 4 bars from zero.
« Last Edit: February 05, 2006, 10:48:02 AM by francois » Logged

Francois
61Dynamic
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« Reply #4 on: February 05, 2006, 11:42:48 AM »
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The Manaco software will tell you when you have reached the proper luminance when calibrating.
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yodelyo
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« Reply #5 on: February 05, 2006, 11:48:09 AM »
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The Manaco software will tell you when you have reached the proper luminance when calibrating.
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Wait! I thought I only calibrate color, NOT luminance, since it is an apple cinema display?
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61Dynamic
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« Reply #6 on: February 05, 2006, 12:04:01 PM »
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As I stated previously, the other way around.

You calibrate the luminance since that is the only adjustment possible on the display.
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plattners@gacnw.com
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« Reply #7 on: February 08, 2006, 11:24:52 PM »
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I have a similar issue. Bought an HP2335 lcd monitor. Calibrated it carefully 2x. I print to an Epson 2200. The problem seems to be the brightness of the monitor. The calibration set the brightness at approximately 80 (scale of 1 to 100). While images are absolutely gorgeous at the level, I can't begin to replicate it with my printer. Can anyone recommend a solution that will bring what I see on the monitor in line with what I can actually print (usually use Epson Premium Luster).
Thanks in advance.
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61Dynamic
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« Reply #8 on: February 09, 2006, 11:33:31 AM »
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From...
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I am fairly challenged when it comes to calibration issues, but I do have an issue that seems to relate to this thread. I have an HP2335 lcd monitor. My problem is, after calibrating it carefully 2x, I can't begin to replicate the bright, brilliant color I see on the screen when I print on my Epson 2200. What would be the best way to correct the situation? I have experimented with the monitor, turning down the brightness by about 50% and reducing the contrast somewhat as well. Should I put my HP monitor on Ebay and hook my old and excellent CRT--Mitsubishi 2060u--back up?
[{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

[a href=\"http://luminous-landscape.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=10009&pid=57760&st=0&#entry57760]From...[/url]
Quote
I have a similar issue. Bought an HP2335 lcd monitor. Calibrated it carefully 2x. I print to an Epson 2200. The problem seems to be the brightness of the monitor. The calibration set the brightness at approximately 80 (scale of 1 to 100). While images are absolutely gorgeous at the level, I can't begin to replicate it with my printer. Can anyone recommend a solution that will bring what I see on the monitor in line with what I can actually print (usually use Epson Premium Luster).
Thanks in advance.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=57760\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

The fact you have adjusted contrast on an LCD points to an improper calibration. Try resetting the display to its factory defaults and re-calibrate to 6500K, 2.2 Gamma, and 120cd/m2 without adjusting anything other than the brightness.

Also, I don't know under what circumstances it is that you are viewing your prints but it is not unexpected for a print to be a little darker than what you see on screen. Prints are a reflective medium and do not project their own light like a display does. How a print looks depends on the quality of light shining on it.
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