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Author Topic: Glossy Paper Recommendation  (Read 4226 times)
T-Bird
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« on: March 26, 2006, 09:25:10 PM »
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Was recently in Springdale, UT (Zion NP) and visited Michael Fatali's gallery.  WOW!  He prints Cibachrome and his landscape images are fantastic.  I would like to try printing some of my landscapes on a very glossy paper to closely emulate the Cibachrome look.

I am printing on a Epson 9800 and am aware, of course, of Epson's glossy paper.  Was wondering about other papers I might try.  Can anyone recommend a paper???  

Thanks,

T-Bird
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KenS
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« Reply #1 on: March 26, 2006, 10:59:11 PM »
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I used to print on Cibarchrome (Ilfochrome) and have lots of them on display in my house so I am very familiar with their look and feel... and I've got some bad news...you are not going to find an inkjet alternative  (although if you mount prints under glass or plexi you may get a bit closer to matching the Ciba look)

I print on an Epson 7800 and I've tried many glossy papers.  Pictorico  High Gloss White Film was recommended to me when I posted the same question as yours elsewhere.  I tried it and I don't recommend it.  The surface gloss is not as high as Ciba, there is more gloss differential with the Pictorico 'paper'  than many of the other glossy papers I've tried and it is very expensive.

May I suggest Kodak Rapid-Dry Premium Glossy sprayed with Premier Art Print Shield. If you go this route be sure to practice spraying Print Shield with a relatively heavy coat so it is wet... not misting (which will result in a gritty surface on a glossy paper). This combination produces a very shiny surface with no gloss differential (for either color or B/W prints)... but don't expect Ciba  

Ken
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keithrsmith
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« Reply #2 on: March 27, 2006, 03:54:23 AM »
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I have seen the suggestion to print in reverse onto transparent film, and then to back the print with a white paper with the non printed side out.

No idea if it's any good though.

Keith
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bob mccarthy
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« Reply #3 on: March 27, 2006, 06:16:44 AM »
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I don't think you can get there with an Epson Printer.

Dye on Glossy will get you much closer. We added an HP Designjet to the Epson mix for glossy. Pretty darn impressive printer too. HP gives long (archival?) life for the print on their media.

bob
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Brian Gilkes
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« Reply #4 on: March 28, 2006, 05:50:12 AM »
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I'm still working on this one. The problem is essentially trying to get gloss with ink on top of the substrate and not under it. Ciba has a thickness of gelatin over the dyes and a very smooth surface. Pictorico has an extremely smooth plastic base, much smoother than paper , but the inks still sit on the surface, thus breaking the surface. In my opinion they are pretty good though, with the K3 inkset using the PhotoBlack.Pictorico is limited to 24" wide .Actually I have been surprised how good the Moab Kokopelli gloss looks. If you want to approach Ciba though , I think it would be best to use a clear gloss coating over the print.
The HP swellable media produces a smooth result by incorporating the dyes within the carrier but this is not a 9800 option.
HTH
Brian
www.pharoseditions.com.au
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bob mccarthy
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« Reply #5 on: March 28, 2006, 09:35:13 AM »
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I don't think you can get there with an Epson Printer.

Dye on Glossy will get you much closer. We added an HP Designjet to the Epson mix for glossy. Pretty darn impressive printer too. HP gives long (archival?) life for the print on their media.

bob
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=61118\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

This might have been confusing. We do not use HP media on the epson printer. Though Epson does produce a dye varient of the 7600 that we have. We bought an HP DJ90 initially and then moved up to the HP DJ130. The combined price was less that the 7600, BTW.

The HP line is not workable for Matte (not archival) and HP Matte paper is not fine art quality. In addition to printing well on glossy and satin, the wonder is we haven't had to do a cleaning since we got them and they sip ink vs gulping ink as does the Espon in comparison. The 7600 runs a significant part of each week and the DJ's are only used occasionally which make the ink handling even more amazing. Down side (HP) is the surface is easily moisture damaged so it's only for mounted fine art. The Epson runs everything else.

Except for Glossy/satin.

bob
« Last Edit: March 28, 2006, 09:43:07 AM by bob mccarthy » Logged
akclimber
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« Reply #6 on: March 28, 2006, 03:47:52 PM »
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Might be worth trying ICI glossy.  Available here:

http://www.digitalartsupplies.com/ici.html

It's a got a high gloss factor and still renders colors very nicely.  I've used it for both color and B&W prints on my 2400.

CHeers!

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Was recently in Springdale, UT (Zion NP) and visited Michael Fatali's gallery.  WOW!  He prints Cibachrome and his landscape images are fantastic.  I would like to try printing some of my landscapes on a very glossy paper to closely emulate the Cibachrome look.

I am printing on a Epson 9800 and am aware, of course, of Epson's glossy paper.  Was wondering about other papers I might try.  Can anyone recommend a paper??? 

Thanks,

T-Bird
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=61104\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
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tsjanik
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« Reply #7 on: April 03, 2006, 09:00:43 PM »
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T-Bird ('57, I assume);

You can get digital or traditional  Cibachrome prints,  there are labs in NY and England (do a Google search), but they are expensive.  Inkjet is not, and will never be, Cibachrome and in my own attempt to produce Ciba-like prints I have come to the realization that if a Cibachrome is what you want then do that, anything else is an approximation.  Having said that, inkjet is a medium of its own and you can produce better prints than you could ever do in a darkroom.  Try Red River glossy, I find it as good as anything I've tried and it is inexpensive.  Pictorico HGF is glossier, but it is expensive and suffers from gloss differential
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T-Bird
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« Reply #8 on: April 03, 2006, 09:22:25 PM »
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Thanks again to all who have replied.  Today I ordered a roll of Epson Glossy and a roll of the Pictorico Film.

Hope to make the same large print on each paper later this week and will compare the differences.

My only intention is to make some large prints, have them framed with a good glass over the top, and hang them in my house or give them for gifts.  I really liked the Ciba's I saw at Fatali's gallery and am hoping to emulate the look.

Thanks again,

Jim

PS: tsjanik:  Unfortunately is is T-Bird 45, not 57!
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dbell
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« Reply #9 on: April 04, 2006, 01:58:17 PM »
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I generally agree with what's already been said about Pictorico Hi-Gloss White Film. I actually like it quite a lot: it's a very glossy surface and it allows for incredible blacks. However, it does NOT have the appearance of depth that a cibachrome print has, and if you handle the print, you can clearly see the differential caused by by the ink being deposited on the surface.  That said, I find it attractive in its own right, and I do lot of printing on it.

Has anyone else used Kodak's Professional Inkjet Photo Paper (not to be confused with their consumer papers, which I do not like)? It comes in a "E" surface and and "F" surface. I've only tried the F surface paper, and I found it be similar to Epson's Premium Glossy.
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KenS
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« Reply #10 on: April 06, 2006, 05:03:43 PM »
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Has anyone else used Kodak's Professional Inkjet Photo Paper (not to be confused with their consumer papers, which I do not like)? It comes in a "E" surface and and "F" surface. I've only tried the F surface paper, and I found it be similar to Epson's Premium Glossy.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=61779\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

My experience with both Kodak Professional glossy and Kodak Premium Rapid-Dry Glossy is similar.  I haven't found much difference between these papers in terms of gloss or surface texture.  As I indicated in my post at the top of this thread they both respond well to Premier Art Print Shield; surface shine is increased and gloss differential is removed by spraying.  I like both papers but now use only the Kodak Premium Rapid-Dry which comes in 24 inch rolls.
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