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Author Topic: MR's computer setup  (Read 8624 times)
Ben Rubinstein
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« on: April 03, 2006, 06:02:39 PM »
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Came across this article:

http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tutorials/digital1.shtml

Have to say I found it funny! Can't see the 2001 computer lineup coping with the 1Ds even nevermind the huge files Michael is processing these days!

What are you using these days on the computer/monitor side of things Michael?
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kbolin
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« Reply #1 on: April 03, 2006, 06:55:54 PM »
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I too am interested as I plan on upgrading my PC later this year... probably to a Mac (replacement to the G5 with Intel).

Also I think that as worthy as LL is with its over 3,000 pages of articles, tutorials, product reviews and photographs it's time to do a cleanup... a cull if you like.  Fortunately I'm able to filter the older material for what I'm really looking for and get to the valuable info or document.  Michael I'm sure you could take a copy with you on your trip to Africa and in your spare time update the site.    

Otherwise I love the site and will continue using it, the forum, and the LLVJ as a source of inspiration, knowledge, and feedback.

Cheers,
Kelly
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61Dynamic
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« Reply #2 on: April 03, 2006, 07:56:53 PM »
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Ha! That's great stuff. I wouldn't be surprised if VPC on my Mac is faster than those IBM-PC systems.

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Michael I'm sure you could take a copy with you on your trip to Africa and in your spare time update the site.
Being a recreational web-designer myself, I must tell you that doing something like that is quite a bit more time-consuming than you might think. Michael told me around last fall that a re-design was in the works and it still hasn't shown up yet and I'm sure the thousands of pages worth of articles has something to do with it.

[span style=\'font-size:7pt;line-height:100%\']*Post repaired by the Department of Redundancy Department.*[/span]
« Last Edit: April 03, 2006, 11:11:36 PM by 61Dynamic » Logged
kbolin
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« Reply #3 on: April 03, 2006, 08:06:01 PM »
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Being a recreational web-designer myself, I must tell you that doing something like that is quite a bit more time-consuming than you might think.

I couldn't agree more... I've been in the computer software industry for over 20 years and have maintained sites in the past with no where near the content of LL.  Hence the purpose for putting the blinking glazed looking eyeballs.    

I'm sure simply dedicating time to this task alone would take a minimum of a couple weeks... which I know if I did it I'd have crossed eyes and in need of an African vacation.

Kelly
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michael
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« Reply #4 on: April 03, 2006, 10:13:18 PM »
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Right as rain.

I was just looking at some old articles today and rolling my eyeballs. The problem is that there are so many cross links that it would be a huge job to rationalize without creating a mess and involving a large expenditure of time, which I don't have.

My current computer set up is a 17" Powerbook with 2GB of RAM. I waiting for the next generation Intel Macs that will be coming out this Fall to do an upgrade. I use a high-end laptop because I live half the year in the city and half the yeat at my house in the country, and travel back a forth a lot as well. I also have a 12" Powerbook which I use for travel and as my email and web machine along with a 23" Cinemadisplay. So essentially I have four screens open on my desk at any one time. One for e-mail, one for the web, one for Photoshop and one for Photoshop palettes.

I have a Sony Arisan on the 17" Powerbook for image procesing, but it's in its third year and likely won't last into 2007. I'm about to start testing high-end LCDs.

Michael
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kbolin
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« Reply #5 on: April 04, 2006, 11:35:26 AM »
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I have a Sony Arisan on the 17" Powerbook for image procesing, but it's in its third year and likely won't last into 2007. I'm about to start testing high-end LCDs.

Michael
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=61726\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

I'm sure there is more than one person on this forum who are interested in the results of your high-end LCD testing.

Kelly
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Ben Rubinstein
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« Reply #6 on: April 04, 2006, 02:57:51 PM »
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Just bought a Apple Cinema Display 20" (going to be dual screen with my older 17" CRT) to go with the new AMD 64 3800+ dual core with 3 gig ram I'm upgrading to, I don't want to hear about anything better, I can't afford it!    

Then again after working on a p4 1.6 with 2 gig ram for 1Ds/5D files, batching 700 pics at a time for two years, I don't think I'll care. There is always something better...
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61Dynamic
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« Reply #7 on: April 04, 2006, 03:23:40 PM »
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LCDs are almost like Mystery Meat.™ You never know if you are getting fillet-minion or dog until you get it home and sniff it.
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DarkPenguin
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« Reply #8 on: April 04, 2006, 03:34:26 PM »
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Just bought a Apple Cinema Display 20" (going to be dual screen with my older 17" CRT) to go with the new AMD 64 3800+ dual core with 3 gig ram I'm upgrading to, I don't want to hear about anything better, I can't afford it!     

Then again after working on a p4 1.6 with 2 gig ram for 1Ds/5D files, batching 700 pics at a time for two years, I don't think I'll care. There is always something better...
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=61789\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

My 3800+ DC AMD with 2G of memory is quite a bit nicer than my P4 3.0G (maybe the C version of that) with the same memory and most of the same disks was.

The ULI based motherboard sucks.  But it is quick.
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jliechty
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« Reply #9 on: April 04, 2006, 09:59:33 PM »
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My 3800+ DC AMD with 2G of memory is quite a bit nicer than my P4 3.0G (maybe the C version of that) with the same memory and most of the same disks was.

The ULI based motherboard sucks.  But it is quick.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=61800\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
My system is very similar to yours and Pom's. Dual core Athlons are great processors, superseded only by dual dual core Opterons (and maybe dual dual core Intel Xeons when they release the new version based on the Pentium M sometime in the future). Mine sits on an ASUS A8N-E motherboard with 4GB of RAM; while the RAM lets programs and files stay in Windows' cache longer, I don't think that my 10MP DSLR files really push its capacity - 2GB of RAM would probably have essentially identical performance unless you were dealing with tons of layers.
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Ben Rubinstein
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« Reply #10 on: April 05, 2006, 10:47:51 AM »
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After doing some serious research on the web, it took me a day just to properly research what kind of video card I wanted what with trawling through all the half baked opinions and 'I've heard', etc that are out there, (the vast majority of them were wrong to the tune of $150 more expensive than they needed to be),  it has become pretty obvious that in these days of serious digital photography, and large megapixel cameras, that there is a serious gap of information availible to the digital photographer.

Most, the vast majority, of reviews and articles are talking to computer people by computer people. There is almost nothing for the higher end digital photographer needing a computer system, from the 20D weekend shooter to the wedding photographer to the studio shooting serious amounts with serious med format backs.

The needs of these photographers are far different to the gamer, the movie watcher, the accountant, etc. They concentrate on processer, ram and storage options, they involve knowledgable information about screens for 2D editing and calibration, dual monitor setups are more necessary and useful.

It would be very useful if some serious articles would be written, maybe by two authors concentrating solely on MAC or PC but not both (i.e. not to confuse those 'locked' for whatever reason into one system) and giving some well informed up to date and knowledgable pointers for those looking for a photo editing system for their level of photography, both desktop and laptop.

Michael, would you be interested in hosting such articles if people were to write them? You seem to know all the top people in the industry, I'm sure such an article/s written by you (are you up to date with PC?) one of your Photoshop gurus would be most appreciated.
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Boghb
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« Reply #11 on: April 05, 2006, 01:44:00 PM »
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"LCDs are like Mystery Meat ..."

How insightful.

I am on my second Eizo GC220, which is supposed to be absolute Filet Mignon, but both were closer to dog (this is difficult terminology for a vegeterian!).  

The first one had a big red blob in the middle that shifted to green on the edges.  The replacement has accurate color but only in the middle.  To get correct color in the corners, you need to look at a 90 degree angle and up close.  Otherwise you see the corners with a magenta tint.  I assumed that was as good as it got, but I know others who are very happy with their unit.  

Did I really get two dogs, but is this as good as it gets with this monitor -- anyone know?
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Mark D Segal
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« Reply #12 on: April 05, 2006, 02:09:22 PM »
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On the subject of computer set-up information useful to Photographers, both Adobe and Microsoft have posted very informative articles on their websites about computer configurations that are suitable and efficient to use for Adobe Photoshop. I downloaded the papers and didn't keep the links. But anyone interested can find them easily by doing a search on their sites. Also, the NAPP (National Association of Photoshop Professionals) in their Members section (joining costs about 100 US if you live in the US giving you a year of the magazine and access to a bunch of other stuff) has an Advice Desk that is equipped to address general and specific questions about computer system configurations for Photoshop users with either Mac or Windows platforms.

I think my monitor is also dying. It is an almost 4 year-old Trinitron. Great colour and well profiled/calibrated, but every few hours it emits a frightening snap and the picture suddenly dies and rebounds, at which point I duck. I think it is trying to tell me something! I'm looking at a LaCie 321G as a possible replacement. Any views?
« Last Edit: April 05, 2006, 02:11:41 PM by MarkDS » Logged

Mark D Segal (formerly MarkDS)
Author: "Scanning Workflows with SilverFast 8....." http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/film/scanning_workflows_with_silverfast_8.shtml
Ben Rubinstein
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« Reply #13 on: April 05, 2006, 05:50:07 PM »
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Can't find the adobe one, been searching there for a while.
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Mark D Segal
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« Reply #14 on: April 05, 2006, 06:33:15 PM »
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Pom,

It is this - more accurately optimzing Photoshop for the computer rather than vice versa, but has insight into the latter as well:

http://www.adobe.com/support/techdocs/332271.html

Mark
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Mark D Segal (formerly MarkDS)
Author: "Scanning Workflows with SilverFast 8....." http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/film/scanning_workflows_with_silverfast_8.shtml
BJL
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« Reply #15 on: April 05, 2006, 07:54:52 PM »
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My current computer set up is a 17" Powerbook with 2GB of RAM ... along with a 23" Cinemadisplay. [a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=61726\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
Interesting to me, since I have done a great deal of my work in various locations on a PowerBook. But I have just had to replace it, and got a Mac mini: I like to have a "real" keyboard, mouse and display at each location anyway, and then the mini is a bit, faster and even lighter to carry.
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Ben Rubinstein
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« Reply #16 on: April 06, 2006, 05:50:33 AM »
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thanks
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tgphoto
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« Reply #17 on: April 06, 2006, 04:35:03 PM »
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I have to admit I was pleasantly surprised to learn MR uses laptops exclusively.  I and another photographer are constantly at odds over this -- he keeps telling me if I wanna do anything I need a dual G5....sorry, but I like being able to take my digital setup with me wherever I go
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thompsonkirk
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« Reply #18 on: April 30, 2006, 09:05:32 PM »
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Dear Boghb,

"Did I really get two dogs, but is this as good as it gets with this monitor -- anyone know?"

I've been been researching the 24" wide-screen model to replace my middle-aged LaCie CRT, & it seems like your experience isn't uncommon.  In the Tom's Hardware review they outperform all competitors in accuracy, but the number of references to defective units is really disconcerting.  I've decided against it, because I don't have a local dealer to run interference for me.
« Last Edit: April 30, 2006, 09:06:22 PM by thompsonkirk » Logged
Jack Flesher
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« Reply #19 on: May 01, 2006, 09:36:48 AM »
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I'm about to start testing high-end LCDs.


[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=61726\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Just last week I got to mess around with the new Eizo Adobe RGB... I may be getting an evaluation sample.  Impressive monitor, but pricey  
« Last Edit: May 01, 2006, 09:37:32 AM by Jack Flesher » Logged

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