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Author Topic: grand canyon  (Read 3589 times)
lafleur
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« on: April 09, 2006, 01:33:21 PM »
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I now have a canon 5d and was wondering which lens would be best for photographing the grand canyon and lanndscape pictures. Any ideas? Thanks Ron
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wolfnowl
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« Reply #1 on: April 09, 2006, 07:45:06 PM »
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I now have a canon 5d and was wondering which lens would be best for photographing the grand canyon and lanndscape pictures. Any ideas?

Forgive me for overstating the obvious, but the best lens to use is what you have...  With all of the different cameras and lenses I've owned over the years, I'll also kept an old Yashica Mat124G double lens reflex camera with a single, unchangeable lens and a 2 1/4" image frame.  At one point I purchased a yellow filter for shooting B&W film and I also purchased a lens hood for flare.  The reason I like this camera is that I've found with interchangeable lenses that it's 'easy' to create any perspective you want just by changing lenses.  This old Yashica forces me to be more creative because I can't just pop on a different lens.  If you're willing to alter YOUR viewpoint, change your perspective, then any lens can work for you.

Mike.
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My Flickr site / Random Thoughts and Other Meanderings at M&M's Musings
DarkPenguin
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« Reply #2 on: April 09, 2006, 09:17:18 PM »
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While altering his perspective with his feet he should watch that first step.  It's a doozy.
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pathfinder
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« Reply #3 on: April 09, 2006, 10:14:40 PM »
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I now have a canon 5d and was wondering which lens would be best for photographing the grand canyon and lanndscape pictures. Any ideas? Thanks Ron
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=62223\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
 Something between 24mm and 200mm ought to provide useful images
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Kenneth Sky
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« Reply #4 on: April 10, 2006, 06:39:13 AM »
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If it's your first visit, you'll be impressed by the vastness of the vista. My choice was the widest angle in my bag.
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Peter McLennan
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« Reply #5 on: April 10, 2006, 12:22:14 PM »
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Just for a contrary viewpoint, if I were stuck at the South Rim with only one lens, I think I'd go for long, not wide.  A wide lens will give you a good record of the place, but you might wind up with a "bin there, done that" shot that looks like everyone else's.   A long lens would offer an endless variety of shots extracted from the whole.

Besides, I'd go for the North Rim, not the south.  

Peter
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kbolin
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« Reply #6 on: April 10, 2006, 01:03:48 PM »
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Forgive me for overstating the obvious, but the best lens to use is what you have... With all of the different cameras and lenses I've owned over the years, I'll also kept an old Yashica Mat124G double lens reflex camera with a single, unchangeable lens and a 2 1/4" image frame. At one point I purchased a yellow filter for shooting B&W film and I also purchased a lens hood for flare. The reason I like this camera is that I've found with interchangeable lenses that it's 'easy' to create any perspective you want just by changing lenses. This old Yashica forces me to be more creative because I can't just pop on a different lens. If you're willing to alter YOUR viewpoint, change your perspective, then any lens can work for you.

Mike.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=62241\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

I couldn't agree more.  On a trip to Malaysia in 2002 I got caught in a tropical rainstorm.  Both bodies & lenses got soaked... one to the point that I could see water droplets through the lens.  Yah I tried to protect it but it was like standing in your shower turning around in circles... it was a challenge.

Anyway... lenses got put away and out came my 17-35mm wide angle (I was shooting film at the time so nice wide angle).  This forced me to be more creative than the 28-135 or 70-200 that I was most accustomed to using.

In the end the best photos I took during that trip ended up being from the 17-35 as it forced me to get close into the action.

Now adays I deliberately leave lenses behind... again it forces me to be creative.

Cheers,
Kelly
« Last Edit: April 10, 2006, 02:13:24 PM by kbolin » Logged

wolfnowl
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« Reply #7 on: April 10, 2006, 10:06:16 PM »
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http://luminous-landscape.com/video_journa...butcher-1.shtml

"If you need more than one lens, you're not a photographer. You've got to learn how to see, and seeing should be part of your technique." - Clyde Butcher
« Last Edit: April 10, 2006, 10:06:51 PM by wolfnowl » Logged

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~ Jean Cooke ~


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lafleur
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« Reply #8 on: April 18, 2006, 07:53:12 PM »
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http://luminous-landscape.com/video_journa...butcher-1.shtml

"If you need more than one lens, you're not a photographer. You've got to learn how to see, and seeing should be part of your technique." - Clyde Butcher
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macgyver
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« Reply #9 on: April 18, 2006, 07:58:00 PM »
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http://luminous-landscape.com/video_journa...butcher-1.shtml

"If you need more than one lens, you're not a photographer. You've got to learn how to see, and seeing should be part of your technique." - Clyde Butcher
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Such a short-sighted view on things.
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Peter Jon White
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« Reply #10 on: April 18, 2006, 11:10:48 PM »
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If I went with one lens it would be the 45mm TS-E. That way I'd get the maximum amount of the subject in sharp focus.

If I went with three lenses they would be the 24mm TS-E, 45mm TS-E and 90mm TS-E. The difficult choice would be what to bring if I only brought two lenses. ;-)
« Last Edit: April 18, 2006, 11:12:19 PM by Peter Jon White » Logged
jjphoto
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« Reply #11 on: April 19, 2006, 09:24:49 AM »
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http://luminous-landscape.com/video_journa...butcher-1.shtml

"If you need more than one lens, you're not a photographer. You've got to learn how to see, and seeing should be part of your technique." - Clyde Butcher
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=62330\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

What a load of crap. It's fine to say that a good photographer should be able to get some excellent images with any single lens but please don't try to suggest that to be a "good" photographer you should endevour to use just one lens under all circumstances. That would be very foolish and would lead to countless lost opportunities.

JJ
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wolfnowl
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« Reply #12 on: April 19, 2006, 01:34:18 PM »
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Well, Clyde Butcher certainly doesn't need me to defend him.  Check out his website (http://clydebutcher.com/) and decide for yourself whether he knows what he's talking about.  

This thread is certainly getting WAY off topic from Ron's original question, but FWIW, I think people misunderstood the quote.  While there's no question that lenses of different focal lengths (as well as different films, different image sensors, different filters, different software, different film planes, different equipment of any kind) can provide different and possibly unique perspectives for photography, if one feels a 'need' (opposed to a want or a desire) to have this equipment for their photographs then, as a pilot would say, they're not flying ahead of their airplane.  We seem to be increasingly dependent on technology to replace what we were born with.  There are those who feel that this is right and that's fine.  There are those who feel there a different way to 'see' the world, and that's fine too.

Mike.
« Last Edit: April 19, 2006, 01:35:13 PM by wolfnowl » Logged

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BernardLanguillier
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« Reply #13 on: April 19, 2006, 08:19:09 PM »
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May I suggest you to check the work of some leading shooters on the Grand Canyon (Alain Briot comes to mind)?

I believe that he typically provides information on what lens he used (keeping in mind that he shoots mostly 4*5).

I am not suggesting you to copy his work, but more to check what kind of lens can be used to yield the kind of image you like.

Cheers,
Bernard
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A few images online here!
wolfnowl
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« Reply #14 on: April 20, 2006, 12:06:09 AM »
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May I suggest you to check the work of some leading shooters on the Grand Canyon (Alain Briot comes to mind)?

I believe that he typically provides information on what lens he used (keeping in mind that he shoots mostly 4*5).

I am not suggesting you to copy his work, but more to check what kind of lens can be used to yield the kind of image you like.

The best advice I've heard on this thread so far...  I believe Alain Briot also uses a Canon 1DS Mark II for some of his work.

Mike.
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If your mind is attuned to beauty, you find beauty in everything.
~ Jean Cooke ~


My Flickr site / Random Thoughts and Other Meanderings at M&M's Musings
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