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Author Topic: Old Oak-Trees  (Read 6421 times)
froghald
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« on: April 09, 2006, 05:03:31 PM »
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Deep in the dark forrests of Wiesbaden/Germany you'll find a hillock with ancient oak trees. The place is shrouded in mystery, it seems that the oak trees are gathered in order to judge...

It is rather hard to capture the scene because the hillock has steep cliffs around so you can't get enough distance for a shoot wich capture the entire scene. Therefore the picture is captured by 6x2 Images of 24mm Portrait-Mode (Sony R1).

I'm sure, that the resulting image could be enhanced. Suggestions are welcomed.

(o.k. I'm going to try a capture early in the morning...)

Froghald
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jdemott
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« Reply #1 on: April 09, 2006, 06:07:00 PM »
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That appears to be a very interesting area to photograph, but also very challenging.   The shapes of the trees are quite interesting and, as you say, they suggest a strong emotional content.  To be successful, I think the image will need a unifying theme or element to bring some sense of visual order out of all the confusing shapes.

As you suggest, one possibility would be to try photographing the scene when there is some strong side light, such as early morning,  so that there are some repeated shadows to create a unifying pattern.

Also, you might try looking for repeated shapes in the trees to set up a visual pattern or progression.  Then you will need to try to work with camera placement, angle of view and depth of field to emphasize the trees/shapes that are your subject.  For example, there are three trees near the center of your image that look very twisted.  Could you stand somewhere so that all three appear close together in the viewfinder and you see their similar shapes right next to each other?

I think you could try leaving out most of the foreground except as is necessary to get the trees into the frame.  The shapes of the trees are what looks interesting (at least in the shot you posted) and the foreground doesn't seem to add much.

A wider angle lens would allow you to fit an entire tree from the foreground into the frame and would also allow you to reduce the apparent scale of the trees that are more distant so that there is a clear difference between the trees that are your subject and those that are in the background.  Alternatively, you could try a narrower angle of view to isolate just a few trees or parts of trees, again with the idea of emphasizing those that exhibit a strong pattern or similarity.  

Have fun.  It looks like an interesting subject.
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John DeMott
davaglo
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« Reply #2 on: April 09, 2006, 09:28:35 PM »
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Most of the trees look like they have been damaged at one time or another. WWII maybe?
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jrg
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« Reply #3 on: April 09, 2006, 10:35:10 PM »
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Most of the trees look like they have been damaged at one time or another. WWII maybe?
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Excessive yellow ribbon tying?
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JRandallNichols
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« Reply #4 on: April 10, 2006, 09:25:42 AM »
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All the suggestions so far sound useful to me, but I wanted to try just a simple crop to try to focus the image as it stands a bit more.  The more normal appearing smaller trees at the sides are distracting me from the interesting gnarled ones, especially the one at center.  (I'm not at Photoshop right now, but suspect some other creative things might be done there.  For instance, I would like to see a BW version perhaps slightly posterized.)
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Randy
tsjanik
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« Reply #5 on: April 10, 2006, 10:42:53 AM »
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Deep in the dark forrests of Wiesbaden/Germany you'll find a hillock with ancient oak trees. The place is shrouded in mystery, it seems that the oak trees are gathered in order to judge...

It is rather hard to capture the scene because the hillock has steep cliffs around so you can't get enough distance for a shoot wich capture the entire scene. Therefore the picture is captured by 6x2 Images of 24mm Portrait-Mode (Sony R1).

I'm sure, that the resulting image could be enhanced. Suggestions are welcomed.

(o.k. I'm going to try a capture early in the morning...)

Froghald
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Froghald:

I would go back and photograph when the sky has dark clouds and ideally with strong direct sunlight hitting the trees(as noted above).  I spent 20 seconds in PS darkening the sky (sloppy work, I know); but I think it helps draw attention to the fantastic tree shapes.
« Last Edit: April 10, 2006, 10:55:58 AM by tsjanik » Logged
froghald
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« Reply #6 on: April 10, 2006, 11:45:12 AM »
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I would go back and photograph when the sky has dark clouds and ideally with strong direct sunlight hitting the trees(as noted above). 

Stunning idea. I think, the best moment for this shot is when the last sun-beams hit the hillock,  just before a thunderstorm is sending its lightning strikes to the oak trees (and the poor photographer is facing his cruel fate   ). Now you know the reason for those odd-shaped trees!

But anyway, I'm carefully watching the weather-forecasts...

Froghald
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