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Author Topic: Blending Photos  (Read 8310 times)
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« on: October 16, 2003, 07:22:28 AM »
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Taking two exposures on the same piece of film is the same as taking one exposure with the same time and aperture as the combination.

In a word - no.

Michael
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Edward
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« Reply #1 on: October 16, 2003, 09:42:20 AM »
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The overexposed picture would be added to the underexposure, with the final result being an even more overexposed picture.  With digital blending you really take only parts of each picture, as it you could cut out the correct areas from each print and make a collage with the best from both.
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-Andrew-
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« Reply #2 on: October 17, 2003, 01:16:27 AM »
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G'day

Quote
The overexposed picture would be added to the underexposure, with the final result being an even more overexposed picture.
Edward, if the photos do end up being over exposed, couldn't i take that into account and expose one of the two exposures less?
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[span style='font-size:8pt;line-height:100%'][ Andrew ][/span]
Lin Evans
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« Reply #3 on: October 22, 2003, 09:36:19 PM »
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The way you would do this with film is exactly like you would do it with digital with the added step of scanning then combining the files in PhotoShop using levels.

What you propose wouldn't work as explained in the other posts, but you "could" do this with combining multiple single frames each exposed for the portion of the frame you wish to enhance.

Often you can do something similar by simply applying levels & curves to bring up one portion such as the sky, then save and do likewise for the foreground and eventually combine the saved images into a single better image than you would get by "averaging" the entire exposure. This is assuming your original exposure was not optimal.
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Lin
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« Reply #4 on: October 16, 2003, 04:33:40 AM »
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G'day

I read the article on digital blending on this web site. And i was wondering if it is possible to blend the photo in the first place; by this i mean make two exposure on the same film thing (what do you call an individual "slot" of film)?
Wouldn't this way be much more efficient than having to blend two images on, say, Photoshop?

Andrew

Okay... i've had 13 views, yet no replies... Is my query clear that it is not worth a reply? Or did i miss something in that "Understanding series - Digital blending"?
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[span style='font-size:8pt;line-height:100%'][ Andrew ][/span]
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« Reply #5 on: October 16, 2003, 07:27:50 AM »
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Won't metering in a "shadow" area and exposing, then metering in a "highlight" area and exposing, create the same desired effect as digital blending?

Andrew

I'm confused (only a beginner!)
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Jonathan Wienke
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« Reply #6 on: October 16, 2003, 03:28:07 PM »
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Think of digital blending as being like taking 2 differently exposed paper prints, cutting out the best bits of each, and taping them together. But doing it digitally means you can't see the edges of the cutouts or the tape.
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Jonathan Wienke
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« Reply #7 on: October 17, 2003, 01:33:31 AM »
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Absolutely not. All you are doing is splitting up a single exposure into multiple time spans, every square millimeter of the film is being exposed for the exact same time interval. That is pointless. What is required is to combine 2 images such that some parts of the film have been exposed for a longer time interval than others.
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