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Author Topic: Window Mount  (Read 3542 times)
kbolin
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« on: April 19, 2006, 08:15:41 PM »
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I'm looking at getting a window mount for a shoot in Africa from a Landrover and will use a Gimbel mount with my 500mm lens.  

Do you have any experience with either of these?  

Kirk Enterprises Window Mount

Ergorest MultiPod

I'm leaning towards the Kirk WM as they do have a good name and haven't heard of the Ergorest but thought I'd ask if someone out here has some experience.

Your help is appreciated.

Kelly
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BernardLanguillier
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« Reply #1 on: April 20, 2006, 03:10:11 AM »
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This review might help:

http://luminous-landscape.com/reviews/acce...dow-widow.shtml

Cheers,
Bernard
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A few images online here!
kbolin
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« Reply #2 on: April 20, 2006, 09:19:47 AM »
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Thanks Bernard I had previously read that and still leaning towards the Kirk but thought I'd ask if anyone had experience with the Ergorest product.  Nobody that I know of had even heard of it.

Kelly
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gkramer
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« Reply #3 on: April 27, 2006, 10:43:15 AM »
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Quote from: kbolin,Apr 20 2006, 10:19 AM
Thanks Bernard I had previously read that and still leaning towards the Kirk but thought I'd ask if anyone had experience with the Ergorest product.  Nobody that I know of had even heard of it.

I have the Ergorest MultPod, and like it--it works as a chestpod and tabletop (or cartop) tripod as well as a car-window mount; with a sturdy ballhead (I use the Acratech), it should it should work OK with your 500mm. However I use it only for long-exposure landscape & panoramic shots and the like. For wildlife, or candid photograpy in general, whether from a car or in the field, a VR or IS telephoto + a sturdy shoulder stock is infinitely handier and quicker to get in action, especially for fleeting targets of opportunity, and, properly used, will produce images to the limits of the resolution of the sensor (Nikon D2X) & lens (Nikon 200-400mm VR), as sharp as any tripod or car-window mount ever made.
« Last Edit: April 28, 2006, 06:40:12 AM by gkramer » Logged
tived
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« Reply #4 on: April 28, 2006, 01:40:21 AM »
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Hi Kelly,

I have had the Ergorest for years now and it is a fun little pod.
Ergorest MultiPod

I have been able to use it as a table tripod with my 1Ds and the 70-200LIS and very stable with a little manfrotto head 308.

great and light to have when needed, plus it is very stable!

Henrik
A Dane Down Under
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AdrianW
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« Reply #5 on: November 08, 2006, 02:28:58 PM »
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Is anyone using the Ergorest with the camera in a portrait orientation? I tend to shoot vertical, and I'm looking for a small inner-city tripod myself...

Mostly I'd be shooting with a 10d and a 17-40 f4/L probably with the Manfrotto 486RC2 - anyone using one have any experience of whether it'll work with a similar setup? I can't seem to find a local retailer who sells the thing, and I don't want to buy blind... Any help would be appreciated!

The key thing here is, vertical. I'm sure it's fine for landscape/horizontal shooting...
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smurdock
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« Reply #6 on: November 08, 2006, 03:25:14 PM »
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I was in Tanzania in September with Andy Biggs and used a Kenesis Safari Sack (beanbag) with my 500mm IS lens.  Worked great.  Pictures were sharp.  Much  more flexible than a window mount since you can use it anywhere along the rim of the vehicle.
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Image Northwest
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« Reply #7 on: November 08, 2006, 04:31:08 PM »
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I have used the window mount by RRS, but have now gone to the beanbag.  The best one out there is the one invented by Arthur Morris, the bird photographer.  I tried it for the first time this last fall with my 600.  Worked great!.  The primary advantages are that you can simply plop the camera/lens down without having to attach it to anything, so it's faster to get the animal in the viewfinder.  Also the degree of viewing area is nearly 180 degrees, depending upon the window configuration, mirrors, etc.  In addition, you can travel with it empty and fill it up at your destination, making your load lighter.  Artie calls it the BLUBB.  Can't remember what that stands for.  Look for it on his website.  

www.birdsasart.com

Bruce Sanford

www.imagenorthwest.com
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