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Author Topic: Blue Wall  (Read 5310 times)
BlasR
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« on: April 29, 2006, 01:02:40 PM »
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I can see a YELLOW line in the small picture, but when i see it big after I click
the yellow line is going.
Oh my GOD I'm getting blind , or it is the small photo?




BlasR
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JLH
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« Reply #1 on: April 29, 2006, 02:16:26 PM »
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You are getting blind!
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Sheldon N
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« Reply #2 on: April 29, 2006, 04:24:32 PM »
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Is it just me, or is the bottom of the photo grainy?





 
« Last Edit: April 29, 2006, 04:25:03 PM by Sheldon N » Logged

mbridgers
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« Reply #3 on: April 29, 2006, 05:52:45 PM »
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Is it just me, or is the bottom of the photo grainy?
 
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=64037\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

No, just dust spots.  Bigger sensors attract more dust.  
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Mark D Segal
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« Reply #4 on: April 30, 2006, 06:54:05 AM »
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It's just you - sand tends to come in very small grains, and with a P-45 back mounted on a Hasselblad mounted on a tripod using a quality lens (seems to be how that image was made), one would probbaly be able to see and count them all.
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Mark D Segal (formerly MarkDS)
Author: "Scanning Workflows with SilverFast 8....." http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/film/scanning_workflows_with_silverfast_8.shtml
michael
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« Reply #5 on: April 30, 2006, 10:03:21 AM »
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Sorry Mark, but you're wrong.

It's a grainy shot, loaded with dust, and containing a yellow stripe.

Michael
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Mark D Segal
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« Reply #6 on: April 30, 2006, 11:56:09 AM »
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OK, that does it - my monitor is going to monitor-heaven next month!  

(says he tongue-in-cheek - but will happen for unrelated reasons anyhow!    )
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Mark D Segal (formerly MarkDS)
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Gellman
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« Reply #7 on: April 30, 2006, 12:15:30 PM »
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Is Michael messing with us? I don't see any yellow stripe or graininess, other than the natural grain of the sand.

I think this is a beautiful shot! I've seen shots of similar subject matter before. But that in no way diminishes the artist's insight and expression that seems evident in this image. This image could be used as an example of why photographers should not shy away from shooting iconic subject matter. It's the artist that counts, and what the artist has to say that matters, much more than the subject matter.

Michael seems to be in a "blue period" of his work. Is it just me, or have others noticed the importance of the color blue to many of Michael's recent images? Obviously, blue is going to be a component of many outdoor landscape photos that include the sky, but I think it goes deeper than that in Michael's recent work.

John
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Mark D Segal
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« Reply #8 on: April 30, 2006, 01:34:11 PM »
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Michael seems to be in a "blue period" of his work. Is it just me, or have others noticed the importance of the color blue to many of Michael's recent images? Obviously, blue is going to be a component of many outdoor landscape photos that include the sky, but I think it goes deeper than that in Michael's recent work.

John
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Well John, as you probably know this has long historic antecedents in the history of art - for example if you go back to about the turn of the last century you'll recall that Picasso had his Blue and Red periods - of course no other similarity implied - I only mention it to say this isn't an unknown phenominon, so we can try to evaluate whether art history is repeating itself in this case. Now taking up on your cue, let us set aside Landscape Photography which does tend to contain blue skies (shadows and water) if you are doing it outdoors during the day, and concentrate on images where there may be more compositional options in the mind's eye - such as this one. If you look carefully, I think this is a psychologically well-balanced image (whether it was conscious or sub-conscious of course hardly matters), because if you abstract the percentage of space occupied by the grey bricks on the blue wall, the remaining amount of blue is probably about equal to the amount of reddish-brown wall space to the left of it. I think that's about as far I can spin it in the realm of empirical discourse, anything further being somewhat more theoretical or speculative and therefore prone to argument. But of course art appreciation is a two-way process - the complement of the artistic experience being what is happening in the minds of the spectators - what strikes one most - the blue, the reddish-brown, the sand, or the overall texture? Is there any reason why one of these elements should strike one any more or less than the others? Did the artist skillfully steer the mind's eye of the spectator to that outcome or does it depend on one's personal reaction to the image? And does that say anything about the spectator's frame of mind as ones eyes wander from blue to red to sand in this image?
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Mark D Segal (formerly MarkDS)
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Sheldon N
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« Reply #9 on: April 30, 2006, 11:23:04 PM »
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Is Michael messing with us? I don't see any yellow stripe or graininess, other than the natural grain of the sand.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=64103\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Sorry I got us off on the wrong path with my poor attempt at a pun...

Grainy... Sand... Get it?  


 


PS. I really enjoy the photo!
« Last Edit: April 30, 2006, 11:23:33 PM by Sheldon N » Logged

OnyimBob
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« Reply #10 on: May 01, 2006, 12:52:11 AM »
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Sheldon, I thought your pun was well done. As for the rest of you, "blue phase" or not, I think you're all pulling someone's leg. Including you Michael - I can't comment on the purported dust or grain, but as for a yellow stripe .... someone's on something or I'm am!
Regardless, It's a great shot. reminds me (the location that is) of a place called Ceduna, near the border of West & South Australia where the sand is taking over an old telegraph station. The ghosts there (and in Kolmanskop I imagine) really talk to you!
Bob.
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Mark D Segal
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« Reply #11 on: May 01, 2006, 08:35:04 AM »
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As for the rest of you, "blue phase" or not, I think you're all pulling someone's leg. Including you Michael ............
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=64156\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

I think you think "right-on"!  
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Mark D Segal (formerly MarkDS)
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BlasR
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« Reply #12 on: May 01, 2006, 09:29:31 AM »
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With all my respect, I think all of you the don't see the yellow line are brinds.
I have eyes like a eagle.

BlasR
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