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Author Topic: Epson network interface (x800 models)  (Read 2281 times)
Roy
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« on: May 03, 2006, 11:44:08 AM »
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Hi,

Can anyone give me hints or advice on using Epson's ethernet network interface? I am setting up a new 4800 and it is a bit far from the computer for USB or firewire (Epson says 10 feet, I need at least 20). I am considering using ethernet. I'm on a Mac running OS 10 and I note that the Epson interface supports rendezvous/bonjour which should make it easy. I'd like to use DNS rather than set a static IP address as everything else on the network uses dynamic addressing, but that seems to make it difficult to access the printer through a web browser. I guess I could try to set the router so it doesn't use the first few addresses in the range and assign one of those to the printer.

Also, is there any loss of function using ethernet? Is it easy to check status and load new firmware, or will I be faced with trying to run a USB cable to the printer for some functions?

Any pointers appreciated.
« Last Edit: May 03, 2006, 11:47:30 AM by Roy » Logged

Roy
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« Reply #1 on: May 03, 2006, 01:03:41 PM »
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Use the most recent 'EpsonNet MacAssist for OS X.app' to set up and connect to the printer. You don't want to use rendezvous/bonjour. Yes, the printer can use dynamic IP addresses. However, you'll be better off if your router/switch can reserve a specific IP address for the printer after assigning it one.  Since the current Macs are gigabit ethernet (and the printer ethernet is only 10/100) you might be tempted to put the printer on a 10/100 port. I keep mine on the 1000 port for the reason that I don't want slow traffic (and slow "10" devices will slow the router, not so much a problem with a switch) and you want to pump as much bandwidth to the printer from the computer as you can. If you have no "10" devices anywhere on the net, this isn't an issue.

Currently, the new printers are all pretty much the same speed under USB 2, Firewire and 100 (or above) enthernet. So assuming your network is reasonably fast without a lot of packet loss or collisions, printing via the network is just fine & dandy. Just be sure the printer ethernet card is one that Epson has sold in the last 12-18 month. Earlier ethernet cards had a lot of problems unless you assigned the card/printer a static IP address.

Using the Epson 'EPSON LFP Remote Panel' all functions and controls of the printer are accessable over the net. I don't need to access the printer via a web browser (although you can) There is no functional difference at this point whether you connect via ethernet or USB/FW although there's no speed benefit either.
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Gene Coggins
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« Reply #2 on: May 04, 2006, 07:25:42 AM »
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Quote
Hi,

Can anyone give me hints or advice on using Epson's ethernet network interface? I am setting up a new 4800 and it is a bit far from the computer for USB or firewire (Epson says 10 feet, I need at least 20). I am considering using ethernet. I'm on a Mac running OS 10 and I note that the Epson interface supports rendezvous/bonjour which should make it easy. I'd like to use DNS rather than set a static IP address as everything else on the network uses dynamic addressing, but that seems to make it difficult to access the printer through a web browser. I guess I could try to set the router so it doesn't use the first few addresses in the range and assign one of those to the printer.

Also, is there any loss of function using ethernet? Is it easy to check status and load new firmware, or will I be faced with trying to run a USB cable to the printer for some functions?

Any pointers appreciated.
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I have a 4800 fitted with an Ethernet card and it has ALL the functionality as if your were using the USB or Firewire connections. In fact you cannot tell from the page setup and print menus that you are using Ethernet. The Ethernet card installs easily with just two screws and a screwdriver. And of course, using a Mac, no additional software is needed since you already have Ethernet.

I have connected to my OS 10.4.X Mac a router and a HUB. All the router plugs, except one, are  connected to other computers. The remaining plug is connected to the HUB (or it can be another router). The printer Ethernet plug is connected to the HUB. The router and HUB will auto assign the proper IP addresses automatically. The reason I have an additional HUB is that I only had four ports available on the router. I should have purchased an eight port router which would have been more eligant.

The maximum distance for a Firewire connection is 15 feet. And I believe 8 feet for USB. The advantage of Ethernet, besides speed, is you can locate your printer more than 100 feet away for your computer.

Hope this helps,

Gene
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