Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1] 2 »   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: External Hard Drive Enclosures  (Read 9674 times)
dmerger
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 686


« on: May 08, 2006, 11:56:28 AM »
ReplyReply

I'd appreciate advice on selecting an external hard drive enclosure.  

I use Windows XP Pro and have USB 2.0 and Firewire connections available.  I use SATA internal drives, and unless advised otherwise I plan to use SATA hard drives in the external enclosure.

I'll use the external hard drives to back up my files. I'm considering using MirrorFolder or a similar program to manage my back ups.
Logged

Dean Erger
gryffyn
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 323


WWW
« Reply #1 on: May 08, 2006, 01:12:27 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote
I use Windows XP Pro and have USB 2.0 and Firewire connections available.  I use SATA internal drives, and unless advised otherwise I plan to use SATA hard drives in the external enclosure.

Why the requirement for SATA drives in external enclosures?  I think you'll find that most enclosures are IDE/ATA based.  I haven't heard of any SATA ones yet, though that doesn't mean there aren't any.

How do you intend to use these drives?  You mentioned backup, but is there a requirement for on-the-road portability as well?  That would make a difference on what type of enclosure might make sense.
Logged

.....Andrzej
boku
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1493



WWW
« Reply #2 on: May 08, 2006, 01:30:11 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote
Why the requirement for SATA drives in external enclosures?  I think you'll find that most enclosures are IDE/ATA based.  I haven't heard of any SATA ones yet, though that doesn't mean there aren't any.

How do you intend to use these drives?  You mentioned backup, but is there a requirement for on-the-road portability as well?  That would make a difference on what type of enclosure might make sense.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=64802\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

These days a Lacie 160 Mb external USB2 drive costs about $125 (or less). It hardly seems worth it to roll your own.
Logged

Bob Kulon

Oh, one more thing...
Play it Straight and Play it True, my Brother.
Paul Sumi
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1217


« Reply #3 on: May 08, 2006, 01:44:26 PM »
ReplyReply

I mostly see these for Mac systems, but take a look here:

http://www.macworld.com/news/2005/10/12/highpoint/index.php

http://www.macworld.com/news/2005/10/05/firmtek/index.php

http://www.macworld.com/news/2006/01/10/sonnetnew/index.php

http://www.macworld.com/news/2006/01/10/wi...dates/index.php

Haven't used any of these, so have no opinion.

Paul
« Last Edit: May 08, 2006, 01:46:22 PM by PaulS » Logged

Dennishh
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 153


« Reply #4 on: May 08, 2006, 04:03:20 PM »
ReplyReply

I bought an internal hot swap enclosure at Compusa for $24 and used it to hold a 300 gig seagate sata drive externaly. It works great if you have an external Sata conector, power and cable. You can also get a 3 bay unit for $125. Sata drives are much faster than a USB2 external.
Dennis
« Last Edit: May 08, 2006, 04:13:16 PM by Dennishh » Logged
61Dynamic
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1442


WWW
« Reply #5 on: May 08, 2006, 04:13:58 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote
These days a Lacie 160 Mb external USB2 drive costs about $125 (or less). It hardly seems worth it to roll your own.
[{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
Unless he has a HDD already in which case ~$60 for an enclosure is already much more cost effective. In fact, rolling one's own is more cost effective than a 160GB external considering a 250GB drive can be had for about $80 (80+60=140).


I have a Adaptec USB2/Firewire enclosure that's worked well. Mine is a IDE but they have [a href=\"http://www.adaptec.com/worldwide/product/prodtechindex.html?cat=/Technology/Consumer+Storage&source=home_menu]SATA versions available[/url].
« Last Edit: May 08, 2006, 04:14:25 PM by 61Dynamic » Logged
Jack Flesher
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2595



WWW
« Reply #6 on: May 08, 2006, 04:43:21 PM »
ReplyReply

I too use SATA drives for back up now and there are a PLETHORA of options -- USB, Firewire and at least three separate SATA connection options; with and without RAID; 1, 2, 4, 5 or even 8 drive bay configurations.  

Knock yourself out on the research HERE and let us know what you decide!

~~~

FWIW if you want an external RAID solution:

Buffalo has their NAS 10/100/1000 and USB2 in a 1TB configuration and is currently selling for about $650 -- though it uses 4@250G IDE drives. (This gives you 750G of usable storage in RAID 5 configuaration.)   However, WiebeTech has a 5-bay SATA 1.25 TB RAID solution complete with 5@250 SATA drives (1 full TB of usable R5 storage) that can be had for about $1700 if you shop.  Obviously, at these prices the IDE Buffalo NAS is pretty cheap  

IF we do the math...   Bare drives are selling for about 35 cents per Gig on 250G and smaller drives (IDE or SATA).  500G drives are about 50 cents per Gig.  To get redundant back-up in a non-RAID configuration, you need to double these figures.  IMO, this makes the 1 TB Buffalo a pretty good buy since it includes RAID, a box and USB or Network connectivity for 87 cents per RAID-ed Gig.   Just a thought...
« Last Edit: May 08, 2006, 04:59:09 PM by Jack Flesher » Logged

nemophoto
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 507



WWW
« Reply #7 on: May 08, 2006, 04:57:26 PM »
ReplyReply

I have two Firewire external drives ( a LaCIE and an IOGear) and and a BIY external SATA. The SATA is nearly twice as fast as the firewire drives, benchmarked in two different programs. SATA is the way of the future: the specs are triple the thruput speed of Firewire800 and the drives are hot-swappable.

You'll do well with external SATA drives, if that's your inclination. Make sure your motherboard is newer, with up to date BIOS.

Nemo
Logged

Dennishh
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 153


« Reply #8 on: May 08, 2006, 05:17:20 PM »
ReplyReply

Jack,
Great post, thanks!!! I can't wait to try one of those 8 bay monsters.
Dennis
Logged
rdonson
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1423


WWW
« Reply #9 on: May 08, 2006, 06:42:23 PM »
ReplyReply

I bought one of these Coolmax USB 2 enclosures for my SATA drive and I've been quite happy with it.  Solidly built with a good aluminum case.

http://www.buy.com/prod/CoolMax_Gemini_CD_...1/10385135.html
Logged

[span style='font-size:14pt;line-height:100%'][span style='font-family:Arial'][span style='font-family:Geneva'][span style='font-size:8pt;line-height:100%']Regards,
Ron[/span][/span][/span][/span]
mcbroomf
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 407


WWW
« Reply #10 on: May 08, 2006, 08:17:10 PM »
ReplyReply

I bought a 4 disk SATA box and card from Cooldrives recently.  Should arrive tomorrow.  I've also seen links to Macgurus and Addonics so there are quite a few out there.  There have been a couple of good strings over on FM, check them out.

Mike
Logged

Mike Broomfield
Website
dmerger
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 686


« Reply #11 on: May 08, 2006, 09:19:05 PM »
ReplyReply

Thanks for all the helpful advice.

I'm now considering a removable SATA rack.  Probably one made by Cremax.  
http://www.pc-pitstop.com/removable_racks/

If I understand correctly, the rack is in two parts.  The outer part is installed in one of my unused 5.25" drive bays in the front of my computer case.  I connect the outer rack to an open SATA port on my motherboard and also connect a power line from my internal power supply.   I then install a SATA HD into the inner rack, which slides in and out of the outer rack.

I'm considering a removable SATA rack because my back-up HD will perform just like a normal internal SATA HD, yet be easy to remove and store in a safe location when not in use.

I intend to use this new HD to "mirror" my "C" drive and, when I run out of space, maybe get another SATA HD just to archive my photos.  I'll probably only connect my back-up HD about once every few weeks to keep it current.
Logged

Dean Erger
Roy
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 196


WWW
« Reply #12 on: May 08, 2006, 10:21:52 PM »
ReplyReply

Before you decide on any enclosure, you should read:

http://www.wiebetech.com/whitepapers/Stora...Reliability.pdf
Logged

Roy
Jack Flesher
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2595



WWW
« Reply #13 on: May 09, 2006, 12:55:51 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote
Before you decide on any enclosure, you should read:

http://www.wiebetech.com/whitepapers/Stora...Reliability.pdf
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=64865\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Yes, a good read.  But the great thing about the 8-bay box is you can have a 4-drive set in RAID 5 configuration (looks like one physical drive) and then RAID 1 (mirror) that to a second 4-drive RAID set for virtually a total-data-loss-proof system   Using Weibie's numbers, your critical data loss event would be lower than .04%, which is very good.  

8 250G SATA drives in this box and in that configuration would give you 750 Gig of hyper-protected data -- and cost right around $1000.  Not bad for that kind of safety.

A third alternative is a triple RAID 1 -- IOW, keep three sets of mirrored drives and now your critical loss event is down around .01% -- or essentially non-existent.  The cost goes up, but only a bit as you only need one more drive, or 9 250G drives to have 750G of even more secure storage.  This also solves a direct physical loss event like fire, since one of the redundant sets can easily be stored offsite.

I almost hate to admit this in public since it sounds Freudian, but this last one is my current strategy though with a slight modification.  The first good news is I only have to buy three drives to start and not all 9 at once.  I keep two mirrored onsite and the third is backed up to monthly and stored offsite.  The kicker is once those drives are full, I only need to replace two since they essentially become read-only drives: One of them becomes a current active "Historical Images" drive on my system while one of the remaining duplicates is stored in a safe offsite. The third copy is re-formatted and used in the new trio of current drives.  In the event the historical drive fails, I simply clone it right away to a new drive using the data available off the duplicate stored drive.
« Last Edit: May 09, 2006, 01:00:31 AM by Jack Flesher » Logged

dmerger
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 686


« Reply #14 on: May 09, 2006, 11:32:47 AM »
ReplyReply

My current "C" drive is RAID 1.  If I get a third copy of my "C" drive via a removable rack or otherwise, which I can store in another location,  I believe I'll have adequate protection.  (All my programs and data are on my "C" drive.  I have another SATA HD which I use solely for Photoshop scratch disk.  When I run out of space on my "C" drive, I'll have to devise another set-up.)

After investigating various options, I may revert to the simplest solution.  I may just install my new HD in my case when I need to access the HD, then remove it for storage.  I can install or remove a HD in less than 30 seconds.  The entire side of my case opens with the opening of a single latch, my HDs just slide into the HD bays and lock with a couple of latches, and the power and SATA connections are easily connected.  

Installing my new HD may not be quite as fast or convenient as a removable rack, however, so I'm still leaning toward a removable rack.  I've narrowed it down to one of the following: MB122SKGF-1S, MB122SKGF-S, MB123SK-1S and MB1213SK-S.

 http://www.cremax.com/internal_single.htm  

I have to determine which model will best connect with my current components.
Logged

Dean Erger
Dennishh
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 153


« Reply #15 on: May 09, 2006, 11:44:26 AM »
ReplyReply

If you think you sound Freudian get this. I wish I could have this whole drive system mounted in a fireproof safe. We all could sleep better if there was a more secure system than yours even. Thanks for the outline of the 8 bay system.  I know have 11 external usb drives that are very slow and almost imposable to catalog. Your system would be so much faster.
Dennis
Logged
DarkPenguin
Guest
« Reply #16 on: May 09, 2006, 01:41:21 PM »
ReplyReply

http://www.reghardware.co.uk/2006/05/09/re...d_storage_plus/
Logged
BernardLanguillier
Sr. Member
****
Online Online

Posts: 8244



WWW
« Reply #17 on: May 09, 2006, 11:10:32 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote
Buffalo has their NAS 10/100/1000 and USB2 in a 1TB configuration and is currently selling for about $650 -- though it uses 4@250G IDE drives. (This gives you 750G of usable storage in RAID 5 configuaration.)   However, WiebeTech has a 5-bay SATA 1.25 TB RAID solution complete with 5@250 SATA drives (1 full TB of usable R5 storage) that can be had for about $1700 if you shop.  Obviously, at these prices the IDE Buffalo NAS is pretty cheap  

IF we do the math...   Bare drives are selling for about 35 cents per Gig on 250G and smaller drives (IDE or SATA).  500G drives are about 50 cents per Gig.  To get redundant back-up in a non-RAID configuration, you need to double these figures.  IMO, this makes the 1 TB Buffalo a pretty good buy since it includes RAID, a box and USB or Network connectivity for 87 cents per RAID-ed Gig.   Just a thought...
[{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Jack,

I have been using a Buffalo TeraStation NAS 1.0 TB configured in RAID 5 for 6 months now, so far so good. I don't think that it can be connected with USB2.0 though. The 2 USB ports enable you to connect other HD to the unit, and these will then be accessible through the network.

[a href=\"http://www.buffalotech.com/products/storage.php]http://www.buffalotech.com/products/storage.php[/url]

The read/write times are not too bad, although it is a 1000 LAN connection, but the main problem comes from the File Browser of PS CS 1... it becomes virtually un-usable...

My next enclosure will probably be SATA based. Let's hope that perpendicular technologies will have made 500 GB HD cheap enough by year end...

Regards,
Bernard
Logged

A few images online here!
Jack Flesher
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2595



WWW
« Reply #18 on: May 10, 2006, 02:28:28 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote
I don't think that it can be connected with USB2.0 though.

Ah, I did not know that, so LAN is required. Regardless, it is still a very good unit.

Because drives are getting so cheap -- I just paid $250 for some Seagate 500G SATA drives -- my triple-RAID5 solution seems pretty solid, especially as technology and pricing moveforward.  

Cheers,
Logged

DarkPenguin
Guest
« Reply #19 on: May 10, 2006, 03:03:07 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote
Ah, I did not know that, so LAN is required. Regardless, it is still a very good unit.

Because drives are getting so cheap -- I just paid $250 for some Seagate 500G SATA drives -- my triple-RAID5 solution seems pretty solid, especially as technology and pricing moveforward.   

Cheers,
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=65008\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Just remember to never have all three sets of drives on site at the same time.  Meteors and all that.
Logged
Pages: [1] 2 »   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad