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Author Topic: Laminating & Outgassing of K3 Prints  (Read 2052 times)
CJD
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« on: May 14, 2006, 09:43:45 AM »
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Like some others, I've noticed significant outgassing from Epson K3 Prints (on Premium Glossy), especially in frames without mounts (mats) where the glass is close or in contact with the print.

I've just got a Jetmounter cold laminator, and was wondering if anyone had experienced the same effect on laminated K3 prints?  And should a curing process prevent/minimise outgassing on laminated prints (if it is a problem).

And laminated prints in frames without glass can be very effective.  You have to relearn how to look at them, compared with normal glass because of different reflections (I think we get used to accommodating glass reflections when we look at framed images), but the resultant  increased “Pop” in the laminated images is just great (compared with prints behind normal glass).

Cheers

Chris
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Paul2660
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« Reply #1 on: May 15, 2006, 04:19:46 PM »
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Any form of Lamination should keep the outgassing away from the glass.

All my work is either ultrachrom 7600 or 7800 (K3), and the paper mainly luster or P Glossy.  both outgass terribly depending on the image involved.

The work I have laminated will not show the effect, however lamination on a large print IMO has it's own disadvantages, mainly in creating a ripple or orange peel look.  I am sure this is very dependent on the process used.  You have to get right up on the print to see the effect, I don't use that often due to my added costs.

Many have reported the used of heat on the prints, followed by pressing between paper, like newprint.  In fact a person who had been to one of th Epson classes on the 7800/9800 said that this was one of the methods Epson recommended.  Basically they said either use a mat paper or expect outgassing.  

I guess that most people don't use Epson paper"s on these printers as to me this is a really big problem and most people don't seem to worry about it.  I don't work that much with mat paper instead preferring the look of luster and Luster has this problem in spades. I don't think the 7800 is any worse than the 7600, but it's also do better.

I have also read that Plexiglass will not have this same problem with outgassing I guess because it wil allow the gasses to pass through and glass will not.  

Paul c.
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Paul Caldwell
Little Rock, Arkansas U.S.
Photography > http://photosofarkansas.com
Blog> http://paulcaldwellphotography.com
Roy
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« Reply #2 on: May 15, 2006, 04:52:27 PM »
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Epson has a note on out-gassing and framing:

http://www.epson.ca/cmc_upload/0/000/019/8...ming%20Tips.pdf
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Roy
paulbk
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« Reply #3 on: May 15, 2006, 05:12:12 PM »
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I don’t understand why a plain sheet of paper on top of the print will accelerate drying? This seems to go against the conventional physics of drying or evaporation. Generally, the easier it is for vapors to escape the local area the faster anything dries. In other words, leave the printed side exposed and uncovered so vapors can escape and not saturate the local area above the print.

I can understand using a spacer sheet if you are stacking prints. But stacking is not the optimum configuration for drying.

By the way, I've never had a problem with this. I use Epson Prem. Photo Luster often and never frame within two days of printing.
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paul b. kramarchyk
Barkhamsted, Connecticut, USA
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