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Author Topic: Monitor Calibration Steps--hardware and software  (Read 32972 times)
Serge Cashman
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« Reply #20 on: May 19, 2006, 07:09:59 PM »
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It is corrected through videocard LUTs (<edit> Don't know about DDC case). It is probably determined by the combination of two.

The paper states that prior to calibration the default state is 6500K and Gamma 2.2. They tested it on Machintosh so can't blame the videocard.

If you have a mac (I don't) just look at your native gamma curves. On my PC LCD monitors it's very close to 2.2 except where I had to mess with buttons on one of them to match the White Point to the other one (I am aware of what it means).
« Last Edit: May 19, 2006, 07:17:15 PM by Serge Cashman » Logged
61Dynamic
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« Reply #21 on: May 19, 2006, 09:53:24 PM »
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Gamma is set by the video card. Nothing else. You can calibrate (CRT) or profile (LCD) for something else if you desire, but the card is where the native gamma is determined.

And to hopefully conclude this conversation since its starting to run in circles, I use a Mac, and I can assure you. It's a gamma of 1.8.
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Serge Cashman
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« Reply #22 on: May 19, 2006, 09:55:01 PM »
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I'm not convinced whatsoever as you can imagine.

OK, Dry Creek to my rescue!

"...While we're at it, get rid of the gamma 1.8 default for Mac monitors. This made sense for the original monochrome Mac displays. It does not now. My suggestion for a default is D65/2.2 gamma."

Thank you Ethan Hansen

http://www.drycreekphoto.com/Learn/monitor...ng_software.htm
« Last Edit: May 19, 2006, 10:00:34 PM by Serge Cashman » Logged
Serge Cashman
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« Reply #23 on: May 19, 2006, 10:11:20 PM »
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How much more authority do you need? Xrite, Apple, Dry Creek... I can't get a Steve Jobs quote on the subject unfortunately...

Plus, just look at the curves...
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dwdallam
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« Reply #24 on: June 10, 2006, 02:46:27 AM »
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I bught the Spyder2 Suite. The hardware is the same for all three version.  After calibrating and using the dry creek profile to proof, I get an exact replica of what I will see when printed. But I do hate sRGB. That is really a crappy color space--flat, dull, etc., compared to Adobe RGB 1998. I hope the new Noritsu printers will print with Adobe 1998 color space, if that is possible.

My question has to do with the calibration process. After I calibrated my monitor, I have noticed that the brightness is turned up to a point where my black screen looks like it is glowing in a dark room. I was always told to keep the brightness at a point where it is just below that glow you get using a black background. It seems that the Spider two wanted my to turn up the brightness (to show all of the blocks Ina  black to white series.

Is this common? It seems to work, since the onscreen proof is exactly how it prints, but it just seems like the brightness is blazing. I mean I'm impressed. When I hold up the printed picture next to the proof using DC's profile, it looks almost like two perfect copies.
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61Dynamic
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« Reply #25 on: June 10, 2006, 11:28:40 AM »
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My question has to do with the calibration process. After I calibrated my monitor, I have noticed that the brightness is turned up to a point where my black screen looks like it is glowing in a dark room. I was always told to keep the brightness at a point where it is just below that glow you get using a black background. It seems that the Spider two wanted my to turn up the brightness (to show all of the blocks Ina  black to white series.

Is this common? It seems to work, since the onscreen proof is exactly how it prints, but it just seems like the brightness is blazing. I mean I'm impressed. When I hold up the printed picture next to the proof using DC's profile, it looks almost like two perfect copies.
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Yes. You aren't supposed to work in a completely dark room and so what you are seeing is normal. There should be some light in the room, around 30-50 lux.
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dwdallam
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« Reply #26 on: June 12, 2006, 04:16:10 PM »
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OK thanks Daniel. I do keep some light on in the room and do not see the glow aat all while working. It's only when I shut all my programs and look at my bare black desktop that I can see it. It's not a bother. I jsut wanted to make sure I did the calibration correctly. From my prints, it seems like it is very close.

Thanks

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Yes. You aren't supposed to work in a completely dark room and so what you are seeing is normal. There should be some light in the room, around 30-50 lux.
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Dinarius
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« Reply #27 on: October 30, 2006, 04:06:58 AM »
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Dan,

In your first reply, in relation to MAC calibration, you wrote that if going Native isn't available as an option, then choose 6500k, 1.8 Gamma and 140 luminance.

Why, if not going Native, does the luminance go from 120 to 140?

Many thanks.

D.
« Last Edit: October 31, 2006, 02:35:43 AM by Dinarius » Logged
61Dynamic
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« Reply #28 on: October 30, 2006, 03:13:41 PM »
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I meant 140 if any of the others were not available. In other words, of you can't get the display down to 120 (which happens with some displays) then 140 is as bright as you want it to get before the brightness becomes a problem.
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eronald
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« Reply #29 on: November 01, 2006, 04:46:30 AM »
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No one is preventing you from making a set of profiles for various monitor brightness and room lighting conditions, and choosing what you feel most comfortable with.

Here's a nice tutorial about screen calibration
http://photoworkshop.com/GMB_ColorCorner/index.html

Edmund
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Dinarius
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« Reply #30 on: November 01, 2006, 05:44:21 AM »
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Edmund,

Thanks for the link.

I take your point. 140 is much too bright for me. That's why I wanted clarification.

Most of my colour correction involves correcting an image of a Gretag CC, so I may as well be using a black and white monitor anyway! ;-)

D.

Edited: Curiously, in the chapter headed 'Advanced Mode' in the above tutorial, under LCD Luminance, he recommends opting for the LCD recommended level of 140.

In my copy of 3.6.1, 120 is the LCD recommendation.
« Last Edit: November 01, 2006, 05:53:34 AM by Dinarius » Logged
61Dynamic
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« Reply #31 on: November 01, 2006, 09:05:39 AM »
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Edited: Curiously, in the chapter headed 'Advanced Mode' in the above tutorial, under LCD Luminance, he recommends opting for the LCD recommended level of 140.

In my copy of 3.6.1, 120 is the LCD recommendation.
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If I'm not mistaken, the EyeOne software used to recommend 140 for LCDs but the ISO spec for color correction recommends 120.
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Dinarius
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« Reply #32 on: November 01, 2006, 11:05:22 AM »
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Daniel,

Just worked out what it is.........

On my PC LCD the recommended is 120.

However, I just loaded the software on a MAC today and the default LCD recommendation is 140.

D.
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msbc
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« Reply #33 on: November 02, 2006, 12:26:22 AM »
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Here's a nice tutorial about screen calibration
http://photoworkshop.com/GMB_ColorCorner/index.html

Edmund
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I watched the tutorial and was surprised to learn that PhotoShop will only display correct color on the Primary display in a 2 display setup even if both displays are calibrated and profiled! Is this just a Windows issue (the tutorial was run on XP) or does it also apply to OSX as well?

I have 20" and 23" ACD's with the 20" as the Primary (I assume this is the one with the OSX Menu bar?) but do my adjustments with PS, Aperture and LightZone on the 23".
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eronald
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« Reply #34 on: November 02, 2006, 02:19:34 AM »
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I watched the tutorial and was surprised to learn that PhotoShop will only display correct color on the Primary display in a 2 display setup even if both displays are calibrated and profiled! Is this just a Windows issue (the tutorial was run on XP) or does it also apply to OSX as well?

I have 20" and 23" ACD's with the 20" as the Primary (I assume this is the one with the OSX Menu bar?) but do my adjustments with PS, Aperture and LightZone on the 23".
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Photoshop will display correctly for two displays on OS X. At least in theory. For windows entirely contained on one display. Using two displays is always a headache though, because of various video card issues that affect profiling, and then even if everything is working right you still need to get the whites and the luminance matched or else you're in trouble when working.

Although many people use an additional palette monitor, I would recommend against it if you are not well-matched, because the false white reference will really damage your color perception if you are full-screen on the calibrated monitor and have white or grey on the other. Also, intensities are even harder to match, because consumer-grade monitors drift. I recommend you move your menus to the big screen, and please reprofile after doing so !

Edmund
« Last Edit: November 02, 2006, 02:24:49 AM by eronald » Logged
61Dynamic
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« Reply #35 on: November 02, 2006, 09:46:29 AM »
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Although many people use an additional palette monitor, I would recommend against it if you are not well-matched, because the false white reference will really damage your color perception if you are full-screen on the calibrated monitor and have white or grey on the other. Also, intensities are even harder to match, because consumer-grade monitors drift. I recommend you move your menus to the big screen, and please reprofile after doing so !

Edmund
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I have to disagree on that. If talking about mis-matched temperatures, then you are correct but otherwise it can work. As long as one takes care to ensure the brightest elements on screen do not appear on the brighter pallet monitor then you will be fine since the eye calibrates itself to the brightest whites it can come across.

Display size, shape and position also can effect this too. For example I notice since my displays are both 15:9 it places the second display further to my right than it would be if both were 4:3 leading it to be less noticeable than if it were closer. That combined with the fact I do not place bright content on the second display, it has no negative side effects on my color work.

If I were to place something white on the second display, then by all means it has an effect on what I see on the primary display.
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eronald
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« Reply #36 on: November 02, 2006, 10:34:45 AM »
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Daniel,

If you feel that your screen-print match is good, then of course all is well !   Everything depends on the eyes and the experience of the beholder ...

To choose an extreme example, if Jane User's boss has just added a bright blue LCD to her dim reddish CRT then Jane's boss may expect surprises at print time. However, I know experienced photographers who use this selfsame type of setup, carefully matched,  to good effect, each display used to its advantage.

Edmund

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it has no negative side effects on my color work.

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« Last Edit: November 02, 2006, 10:38:22 AM by eronald » Logged
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