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Author Topic: Mounting inkjet prints  (Read 7623 times)
alexramsay
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« on: June 08, 2006, 07:10:34 AM »
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Does anyone have any advice on the mounting of inkjet prints for display? - I have usually cut mats in the past but would now like to print borderless and display the whole image. What adhesives are safe to use with inkjets?

Thanks,
Alex
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David White
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« Reply #1 on: June 08, 2006, 09:45:27 AM »
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I think the jury is still out on using hot mount presses on inkjet prints.  I think that Alain Briot uses the Coda cold mount system.  For now I am using cold mount tissue with a hand roller.
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KenS
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« Reply #2 on: June 08, 2006, 10:26:04 AM »
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I've had excellent success mounting glossy inkjet prints up to 24 x 32 inches using Bainbridge Artcare Restore:

http://talasonline.com/photos/instructions...ountingTips.pdf

I use it in a Seal drymounting press at about 150 deg, adhesive comes on the foamcore substrate so there is no messing with dry mount tissue.  The lower temperature for Restore (vs. approx 200 deg F for typical dry mount tissue) is probably better for  inkjet prints.

Damaging prints is also reduced considerably because you don't use a separate tissue that introduces more surfaces prone to trap small dirt particles that unexpectedly show up after pressing.  It's much easy to work clean.  The surface is smooth enough so that the surface texture of glossy prints does not take on very much of an 'orange peel' look when using 9 ml Kodak Premium Glossy.  I suspect the 10.4 ml Epson  Glossy will be even less effected by surface texture, if at all.  I doubt that any non-glossy papers would show any texture changes.

My press is 18x23 inches.  I found that using a 4-ply mat board on top of release paper I can mount large prints in sections (e.g. 24 x 32)... just need to be sure a few inches of release paper and mat board on top of the print are overhanging the ends of the print to avoid seams.

BTW, I also tried Gudy 870 cold mounting adhesive a while back.  I applied it by hand.  It worked okay for small prints (up to 11 x 14) but I had several disasters trying to mount larger prints due to air bubbles.  I gave it up.

Ken
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framah
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« Reply #3 on: June 08, 2006, 03:09:02 PM »
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I heat mount all of my prints which are printed with pigment inks  on my Epson 9600 with no adverse effects.  I mount at 180 -190 degrees for about 4 minutes.
This doesn't mean ALL inkjet prints will take the heat. You need to test each type to find out. I just know it works with my prints.  
I own a custom framing business and have my own 40x60 heat mount table  I have mounted enhanced matte, glossy, canvas, etc and so far, no problems.

I have heard of problems with Artcare in that it is a very tenuous hold and the image will peel right off. If you plan to display full bleed images with no mat then you want it stuck down permanently.
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KenS
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« Reply #4 on: June 08, 2006, 04:50:14 PM »
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I have heard of problems with Artcare in that it is a very tenuous hold and the image will peel right off. If you plan to display full bleed images with no mat then you want it stuck down permanently.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=67726\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Thanks for remarks about a possible tenuous hold with Artcare Restore.  However I haven't had any problems myself with the 20 or so prints I've mounted so far.  I put them in my press for 30-35 seconds, let them cool with some weight on top.

I purchase the Restore boards from a framing shop who uses them all the time for their customers.  I believe Bainbridge makes another product (not called Restore, but possibly with the name Artcare in it?) that is for temporary mounting.  Perhaps there is some confusion with that other product?
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larryg
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« Reply #5 on: June 08, 2006, 05:21:29 PM »
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I have the CODA press.  I have had some problems with (mostly acrylic film) the CODA  If you don't get things lined up just right you got problems with bubbles or creases in the print.  (this is most relative to larger sizes)
Yes I have heard people say they never have problems using it, but I have a frame shop and would not ever take a chance on someone elses work, especially if it can't be replaced.

We now use a vacume (heated) press  Bienfang  4460    with Buffermount tissue
at about 175 degrees or so.   This is reversable and can't be undone (I wouldn't always count on that feature however).
I have used it very successfully on Epson papers Semi Luster, Matte, and various others.

The laiminate or acylic that goes on top works very well also.

The only concern is that the press is expensive and might not be best for everyone.
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Barry Prager
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« Reply #6 on: June 11, 2006, 02:38:36 PM »
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I'm not sure how you plan to display the whole image, but what I do is to print the whole picture on a sheet of paper, say a 10"x6.65" image on a 8"x11" sheet of paper with a black stroke.  Then I cut my mat window 3/16 oversize.  I then hang the print from the inside of the mat.  One can then see the whole image.  You shouldn't be placing the print against the glass, and unframed can look cheap.

Honeybadger.
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russell a
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« Reply #7 on: June 11, 2006, 04:50:38 PM »
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I use Pres-On acid free z-core boards.  Their web site is http://www.pres-on.com/products.cgi?pclass=z10  I always order by phone, their web site is not friendly but otherwise they ship reliably in virtually armored containers that insure the boards arrive intact.  I use the hi-tack boards.   I do this for prints from 8x10 to 24x30.  Since I crop depending on the image, this saves cutiing odd shaped mats - I print leaving a white border appropriate to the image.  I dislike mats anyway.

I don't need a press, but do the following:  Use a mat knife to begin the separation of the slick cover that protects the tacky service (this is the most difficult step - find where the line is under a bright light), align the print with the edges of the mounting board maintain the position with a few (4-6, depending on the size of the print) Oxo kitchen clamps, roll back the end of your print a bit at the end where you started the separation, roll back the protective tack cover about three inches and fold a crease in it so lies back flat, fasten that end of the print to the exposed tack by pressing from the middle of the fold out to the edges.  The print will not move now, so remove the clamps and gradually pull the remaining protective cover three or so inches at a time, smoothing your print as you go - voila! you are done.

To prevent the print from touching the glass in a frame  I use Frame-Tek spacers http://www.frametek.com/    When I submit prints framed this way to exhibitions hardly anyone notices that they aren't matted.  It is a very clean look.
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AndyF
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« Reply #8 on: June 15, 2006, 06:56:04 AM »
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My suggestion is similar to Honeybadger's; resize your image to about 1/2 inch less H & V than the paper size and print the image centered, I leave the rest of the paper unprinted (Barry - what did you mean, a blackstroke?).

Cut the mat opening 1/4" wider H & V than the print; there is now a 1/8" open space between the edge of the image and the mat, which may be the effect you want, and none of the image is hidden.

The paper is still under the mat and hence held flat by the mat, and the mounting tape can be done, and hidden, normally.

Andy
« Last Edit: June 15, 2006, 06:56:52 AM by AndyF » Logged
jdyke
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« Reply #9 on: June 15, 2006, 08:11:10 AM »
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I think it can also depend on the weight and type of paper used - not forgetting the size of the print.  

I have seen many prints with what I consider to be over elaborate mattes and also some quite obtrusive colours.  At the end of the day the photo is what counts and that is what people should be looking at.  Thats why I tend to stick to a single matte using natural white museum board.

I tend to leave some space around the print on the paper and then mount on a matte board with a front matte window cut to the size of the print.  I cut my window so it just slighltly overlaps the image.  I tend to print on 250gm+ paper (Photorag and Innova FBG) and find that normally hinge mounitng and photo-corners do the trick for me. It also allows the print to 'breath' due to enviromental differences.


I know some people like to cut the window larger (or use double mattes) so that a thin white border exists for signing the print and this can look good with much larger prints, but IMHO it does not look that great with smaller prints.
 
My advice would be to try the cheaper approach first before forking out a fair amount of 'wedge' for a cold or dry mount solution.

Regards,
JD
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Barry Prager
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« Reply #10 on: June 16, 2006, 10:03:53 PM »
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(Barry - what did you mean, a blackstroke?).


A stroke is just a colored line around the outside of the image.  In Photoshop, it's called a stroke.  You can set the size and color, which is nice, to suit the photo.  Black is the standard, of course.
« Last Edit: June 16, 2006, 10:05:24 PM by Barry Prager » Logged
AndyF
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« Reply #11 on: June 17, 2006, 03:59:07 PM »
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(Barry - what did you mean, a blackstroke?).
A stroke is just a colored line around the outside of the image.  In Photoshop, it's called a stroke.  You can set the size and color, which is nice, to suit the photo.  Black is the standard, of course.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=68366\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
Thanks - I was unfamiliar with the term.  I had used an extremely light cream colour once to fill that area since the cold bright white of the unprinted paper was hard to match with a mat.
Andy
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