Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: Printer/paper with quality akin to oil paintings  (Read 5150 times)
Gregory
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 191


WWW
« on: July 11, 2006, 11:10:59 AM »
ReplyReply

I'd like to begin printing, framing and selling some of my own photographs locally (here in Hong Kong), but I want a product with colours that are vibrant (when appropriate) and alive, something akin to the feeling you get when you view a wonderful oil painting, something that far exceeds the quality of an average photograph. this is obviously not possible with output from the local photo centre using a Frontier and Fuji Archive paper, nor is it possible with my blues-aren't-blue Epson 1290. I firmly believe that I will need to (lovingly) print the photos myself on better equipment, hence, I'm asking for advice from the professionals.

what printers, ink and paper would you recommend for the best possible printed images, up to 24" x 16", preferably with a paper texture somewhere between matt and glossy; ie, a textured glossy paper? colour, physical feel and overall quality (and longevity) are the important goals, to make the final products stick out from run-of-the-mill commercial printed photos.

am I asking for too much?

sincerely,
Gregory
« Last Edit: July 11, 2006, 11:11:35 AM by Gregory » Logged

Gregory's Blog: An Aussie in HK
Equipment: Canon EOS 1D Mark III, 17-40L, 24-105L, 70-300 DO
pobrien3
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 320


« Reply #1 on: July 11, 2006, 12:17:48 PM »
ReplyReply

The texture of HP's Premium Photo Paper Satin sounds like what you might be looking for - heavy paper with nice textured backing too, I really like the paper.  The HP DJ90 prints up to 18" wide, might be what you're looking for.  You can see them at Mr Computer in 298 Hennessy Road - the owner, Cindy, is very helpful.

Photo printing services in HK (film or digital) are crap.  I've never got one decent print from any of them, including Robert Lam's premium professional service - but they did manage to destroy a negative whilst 'cleaning' it.  No matter what printer option you choose, you'll do better yourself.

The big drawback here is the lack of availability of printing papers.  You can buy the main Epson and Canon papers, but even the HP PPP Satin can be hgard to come by.  I travel a lot on business so buy abroad - I have to.

Peter
PS - I do a fair bit of event and performance photography in HK - we may cross paths!
« Last Edit: July 11, 2006, 12:18:18 PM by pobrien3 » Logged
JeffKohn
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1671



WWW
« Reply #2 on: July 11, 2006, 12:23:31 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote
what printers, ink and paper would you recommend for the best possible printed images, up to 24" x 16", preferably with a paper texture somewhere between matt and glossy; ie, a textured glossy paper? colour, physical feel and overall quality (and longevity) are the important goals, to make the final products stick out from run-of-the-mill commercial printed photos.

am I asking for too much?

sincerely,
Gregory
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=70357\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
If you want a semi-gloss, fiber/art paper with excellent gamut and DMAX, I can recommend the new Innova F-Type Gloss paper. It produces some really nice prints with the K3 inkset (I use an Epson 2400).

For 16" wide prints (and I'm assuming you want archival prints), your two choices right now are the Epson 4800 and the Canon ipf5000. If I were purchasing today I would choose the latter but it's new to the market and a bit of an unknown compared to the 4800 which has been around for a while. I print on both gloss and matte papers though, so the cost of swapping blacks on the 4800 is a deal-breaker for me.
Logged

pobrien3
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 320


« Reply #3 on: July 11, 2006, 01:28:42 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote
If you want a semi-gloss, fiber/art paper with excellent gamut and DMAX, I can recommend the new Innova F-Type Gloss paper. It produces some really nice prints with the K3 inkset (I use an Epson 2400).

For 16" wide prints (and I'm assuming you want archival prints), your two choices right now are the Epson 4800 and the Canon ipf5000. <...>[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=70368\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
Jeff, we can't get that paper in Hong Kong and I haven't found it available in other Asian countries, plus most online retailers won't ship to HK.  I'd like to try it myself as I generally find matt to be lacking in contrast and too washed out.

Also, the HP90 can't be ruled out here: the output on PPP Satin is lovely.  From Gregory's description of the textural aspects he wants from the medium I immediately thought that this paper would be ideal.  Forgetting pros and cons of HP vs Epson, dye vs pigment - that is the paper I would want to use for exhibition.

I personally didn't buy HP because I got hung up on the susceptability of the prints to moisture, and  I frankly find the 4800's output on glossy to be unacceptable (and the ink swap issue removed any doubt I might ever have had).  So I use the lowly R1800 as most demands for my prints are on glossy paper.

Gregory - the Epson distributor for HK will happily let you come to their main showroom and bring your own files to print on any of their machines (but they'll only have a small range of Epson papers to try), as will most of the HP dealers.  Best to go see and try them for yourself, it's the only way to know what you'll be personally happy with.
Logged
nihil
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 52



WWW
« Reply #4 on: July 11, 2006, 07:01:20 PM »
ReplyReply

I have the exact same wish. Something that resembles oil paintings. Something with a rough and really random texture. Not found it yet though.

My favorite so far is the Innova F-type Gloss, a textured glossy paper like you mention. I just got to find out which of the differing versions I've received is the real thing. From usual semigloss papers this is really a big step in the right direction.
Logged

regards,
Erlend Mørk
Gregory
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 191


WWW
« Reply #5 on: July 12, 2006, 12:59:11 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote
I have the exact same wish. Something that resembles oil paintings. Something with a rough and really random texture.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=70404\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
someone who understands what I'm wishing for and wants the same thing... and I thought I was going to sound like some crazy amateur.

so far, the Canon xxx5000 looks promising. I guess if I were to use the Innova fibre paper, I'd need to create personal profiles... mmm... stupid comment... I'd need to create personal profiles even if I was using 'standard' Canon paper...

now where to get the Innova paper... it sounds like there are at least two people here in Hong Kong who would like to try it; myself and Peter. (and Hong Kong people continue to claim that you can buy anything here!)
Logged

Gregory's Blog: An Aussie in HK
Equipment: Canon EOS 1D Mark III, 17-40L, 24-105L, 70-300 DO
JeffKohn
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1671



WWW
« Reply #6 on: July 12, 2006, 03:13:34 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote
Jeff, we can't get that paper in Hong Kong and I haven't found it available in other Asian countries, plus most online retailers won't ship to HK.  I'd like to try it myself as I generally find matt to be lacking in contrast and too washed out.[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=70373\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
Even here in the US availability of these papers has beens sporadic and frankly a bit frustrating (not just the Innova, but also the Crane and Hahnemuhle offerings). I just finally got some of the Innova F-Type in 13x19 sheets this week. I would hope that this situation would improve in the near future both in the US and elsewhere.

Quote
Also, the HP90 can't be ruled out here: the output on PPP Satin is lovely.  From Gregory's description of the textural aspects he wants from the medium I immediately thought that this paper would be ideal.  Forgetting pros and cons of HP vs Epson, dye vs pigment - that is the paper I would want to use for exhibition.
No doubt satin prints from the DJ90 will have higher image quality than lab prints.  But the paper itself is still like lab photo paper in its look and feel. Maybe it's a bit thicker, but the point is it's not a real fiber/rag paper which is what I understood the original poster to be looking for. Reading the last paragraph in particular of Gregory's first post, I'd say he's almost perfectly described the Innova F-Type paper.

I've used Ilford Smooth Pearl for prints that didn't reproduce well on matte paper up until now, but comparing it side-by-side with the new fiber-type glossy papers there's just no comparison.
Logged

Pages: [1]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad