Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: Matting Bright White Papers  (Read 2602 times)
skibum187
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 72


« on: August 29, 2006, 02:35:04 PM »
ReplyReply

Just curious as to what kinds of matt people are using when matting bright white fine art papers. I'm using Moab Entrada Bright White and during a recent visit to my frame supply shop, I found that none of the matts they carried were even close to as white as the paper. All of them were either too cream colored or too grey. Has anybody found a 'very white' paper that would match this type of paper?
Logged
jule
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 738


WWW
« Reply #1 on: August 29, 2006, 03:13:31 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote
Just curious as to what kinds of matt people are using when matting bright white fine art papers. I'm using Moab Entrada Bright White and during a recent visit to my frame supply shop, I found that none of the matts they carried were even close to as white as the paper. All of them were either too cream colored or too grey. Has anybody found a 'very white' paper that would match this type of paper?
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=74866\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
I am curious as to why you would want a really white matt. I would choose a matt to complement the image - which would cover the paper anyway. I use a white - but am not sure of the code though.

Stark white matts can sometimes look too clinical and stand out too much against the image. I prefer to let the image be the feature and stand out more, rather than the matt.

Why don't you try a few of the whites against some printed images, instead of the unprinted paper.

Julie
Logged

dlashier
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 518



WWW
« Reply #2 on: August 29, 2006, 05:21:21 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote
Just curious as to what kinds of matt people are using when matting bright white fine art papers. I'm using Moab Entrada Bright White and during a recent visit to my frame supply shop, I found that none of the matts they carried were even close to as white as the paper.[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=74866\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
I assume you're exposing a bit of the paper. You don't want the mat to be the same as the paper but just a tad less white. I found some of the mats from Light Impressions to work well - they have quite a variety of whites including some pretty "white" ones. Not cheap though.

- DL
« Last Edit: August 29, 2006, 05:36:01 PM by dlashier » Logged

Eric Myrvaagnes
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8086



WWW
« Reply #3 on: August 29, 2006, 08:11:37 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote
I assume you're exposing a bit of the paper. You don't want the mat to be the same as the paper but just a tad less white. I found some of the mats from Light Impressions to work well - they have quite a variety of whites including some pretty "white" ones. Not cheap though.

- DL
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=74875\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
Light Impressions will sell you 4x5" sample packs of their papers. This makes it easier to choose the color you want.

-Eric
Logged

-Eric Myrvaagnes

http://myrvaagnes.com  Visit my website. New images each season.
jule
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 738


WWW
« Reply #4 on: August 30, 2006, 12:04:46 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote
I assume you're exposing a bit of the paper. You don't want the mat to be the same as the paper but just a tad less white.
- DL
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=74875\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
ahhhh.....that explains why. I haven't seen that done before. Thanks.

Julie
« Last Edit: August 30, 2006, 12:05:07 AM by jule » Logged

Pages: [1]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad