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Author Topic: New system from Hasselblad?  (Read 19034 times)
Nemo
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« Reply #20 on: September 19, 2006, 07:08:26 AM »
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The new camera is confirmed. It will be presented at the Photokina.
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Nemo
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« Reply #21 on: September 19, 2006, 07:12:40 AM »
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Valentín Sama's blog:

http://www.valentinsama.blogspot.com/

also in newletters from Hasselblad.

Maybe is not a squared sensor (this point is not confirmed), but it is a new "48mm format" (?).
« Last Edit: September 20, 2006, 12:09:43 PM by Nemo » Logged
Nemo
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« Reply #22 on: September 21, 2006, 03:05:17 AM »
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photokina press conference and 1-2-1 interview invitation

Don’t miss Hasselblad’s photokina press conference, where CEO Christian Poulsen and other senior executives will unveil:

·        The world’s most advanced 48mm DSLR camera system

·        The company’s new strategy: No More Compromises For Film – Our Future is Digital!

·        Future industry trends & Hasselblad’s own initiative to establish an image quality standard to help professional photographers charge fairly for images of exceptional quality


Date:            Wednesday 27th September 2006

Time:            1100hrs – 1230hrs

Location:      Conference Room 3-5, Congress Centre E/N



You’ll also be able to see the broadest range of products in the high-end digital photography market on the Hasselblad stand - Hall 2.1, Stand A020/B029 and B020/B028 – as well as Hasselblad’s new, high quality magazine, VICTOR by Hasselblad.
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free1000
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« Reply #23 on: September 21, 2006, 01:18:39 PM »
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There is no mention of the word 'new' anywhere. I wonder if this is just a re-presentation of the H2 with the integrated back?  

Hassleblad have used the same terminology in their recent advertising to describe the flagship integrated H2. As 'tested' in BJP last week. I say 'tested' in scare quotes because the reviewer evidently missed the tasty yellow hue of the skin tones in the samples printed with the article. Of course it may just have been the look they were going for, that warm 'sallow' look slightly redolent of a damaged liver.  

OK it wasn't that bad.
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MarkKay
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« Reply #24 on: September 21, 2006, 02:25:05 PM »
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In terms of modern  technology, in this age --- "never" translates into  --- at least not in the next couple of  years...  

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I am pretty sure, from my sources, that we will never see a 6x7 FF chip. In fact, one strong source doesn't feel we'll see anything bigger than 645. I believe him. There's no way the economy of scale works for anything bigger than 645.

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Gary Ferguson
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« Reply #25 on: September 21, 2006, 03:21:42 PM »
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The company’s new strategy: No More Compromises For Film – Our Future is Digital!

I wonder if "compromises for film" include supporting the V system, maybe it's finally the end of the V road?
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ErikKaffehr
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« Reply #26 on: September 21, 2006, 03:23:32 PM »
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Some info:

I read an interview with Christian Poulsen (CEO of Hasselblad) in a Swedish magazine this summer (Cap&Design Proffsfoto June 2006).

He expressed a strong belief that the future of Hasselblad is not in "Digital Backs" but in complete cameras. They would keep the H-bayonet, but make the sensor smaller. This would allow for smaller and cheaper lenses while keeping compatibilty with existing the existing system. An additional benefit for Hasselblad would of course be that the move would leave Phase One and Leaf out.

Mr. Poulsen was CEO of Imacon, known for filmscanners but also for digital backs. Previous year Imacon merged with Hasselblad.

Best regards
Erik


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Hasselblad could be developing a new system based on a 48x48mm sensor (or 36x48mm). This new system might be presented at the Photokina:

http://valentinsama.blogspot.com/2006/08/n...lblad-para.html

 
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yaya
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« Reply #27 on: September 21, 2006, 03:45:56 PM »
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There is no mention of the word 'new' anywhere. I wonder if this is just a re-presentation of the H2 with the integrated back? 

Hassleblad have used the same terminology in their recent advertising to describe the flagship integrated H2. As 'tested' in BJP last week. I say 'tested' in scare quotes because the reviewer evidently missed the tasty yellow hue of the skin tones in the samples printed with the article. Of course it may just have been the look they were going for, that warm 'sallow' look slightly redolent of a damaged liver.   

OK it wasn't that bad.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=77167\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

I think all the photographic magazines these days suffer from a serious lack of technical knowledge and there are less than a handful of reviewers world wide that can really master a MFDB and it's software on a level that allows them to be respected by their readers.

This is why occasionaly one reviewr will rave a product that other will trash and this is why they often miss the real pluses and/or minuses of the product.

In the review mentioned above, the reviewer is referring to the lack of Moire in an image that  supposadly has potential for moire.
Anyone who shoots high end digital will notice that the metal background is out of focus therefore will not produce anything, while the sunglasses in the front show quite a substantial amount of colour moire.
This may well be due to a print problem or wrong settings that were being used for processing, but in this case it simply shows that the reviewer doesn't really understand what he is looking at...

We as manufacturers are somehow stuck in the middle, between photographers who want to buy the product and can be mislead by one review or another, and magazines that are not capable of doing justice to the product (if it's a good one) or show it's real disadvantages when relevant....

Yair
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eronald
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« Reply #28 on: September 21, 2006, 08:31:49 PM »
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I think all the photographic magazines these days suffer from a serious lack of technical knowledge and there are less than a handful of reviewers world wide that can really master a MFDB and it's software on a level that allows them to be respected by their readers.

This is why occasionaly one reviewr will rave a product that other will trash and this is why they often miss the real pluses and/or minuses of the product.

We as manufacturers are somehow stuck in the middle, between photographers who want to buy the product and can be mislead by one review or another, and magazines that are not capable of doing justice to the product (if it's a good one) or show it's real disadvantages when relevant....

Yair
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I find myself in the uncomfortable position of agreeing with Yair. The reviews I've seen don't do justice to the work which goes into perfecting the high end products.

But I do disagree with the "handful of reviewers" in Yair's statement.  There are few competent reviewers, but they are available on tap - almost every publication has a staff geek or a top-notch consultant hidden away to be trotted out when necessary.  I should know, when younger I've acted as this trophy-geek often enough for the french computer press.

I see two main reasons why magazines prefer not to activate their trophy-geeks.

Firstly, geeks are really expensive. My last publication moaned all the time about my rates, while agreeing they were justified by the quality of the writing and the readership accrued.

And then, geeks are opinionated, unpredictable and uncontrollable - they care about tech, and will as likely as not point out the product's critical failings  - this is what happened to Aperture at launch, some photo geeks hated the image quality, and missed some essential features, and they were very vocal.  But instead of listening, Apple shouted back. I should know, I was at the receiving end of some of the shouts

Now, no magazine will want to antagonize their advertisers on a regular basis - so they prefer to use the pattern of feature-list & product description and keep everybody happy. Easy to write, pleases everybody, no comebacks. And the geeks stay safely chained in the basement. Of course, a company that wants a careful review can always request one ...

For completeness' sake, I should say that some rare companies actively support geek-reviews and geek-articles.  Adobe is such a geek-journalist lover : They will help you, make their personnel available, make sure you get all the support you need to learn complex procedures, and never complain about what you say. And, guess what ? They're successful and their products just keep getting better.

Now,  I have a suggestion Yair, you can tell your favorite magazine that you would like your back to be reviewed by me, and then leave it in my hands for the 6 weeks to two months I would need to learn to use the software decently and exercise the hardware - irrealistic ? I guess so.

Frankly, I don't think that a solid opinion on the nuances one can hope to get out of this type of hardware can be formulated in less than a month, it took me much longer to learn to use my 35 mm digital systems, develop a look with them and start to stretch them -  if you want a quick evaluation, then a testchart or standard target composition shoot will give you that, and leave you with next to no usable information.

Left in neutral gear, digital systems go nowhere, life starts to get much more interesting when you push them  James here is a good example of somebody who knows how to stretch his Leaf back.

Edmund
« Last Edit: September 21, 2006, 10:19:09 PM by eronald » Logged

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yaya
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« Reply #29 on: September 22, 2006, 01:59:59 AM »
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But I do disagree with the "handful of reviewers" in Yair's statement.  There are few competent reviewers, but they are available on tap - almost every publication has a staff geek or a top-notch consultant hidden away to be trotted out when necessary. 


I don't think a good reviewer needs to be a geek, but he/ she should be an experienced digital photographer who uses MFDB for a living that also knows how to analise the product and write about it in a language that other photographers will understand.

It is OK if he/ she uses as certain brand and even if the review is biased, as long as the information is passed in the right way. Quating the spec and the words of a company spokesmen is only half a job done, IMO

Yair
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free1000
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« Reply #30 on: September 22, 2006, 03:18:03 AM »
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I noticed the appalling error in the comment about Moire in that article.  It basically devalued anything else the reviewer may have said.

Its hard to find a review that is anything but a 'puff' for the product.

Actually, Uwe Steinmullers test in previous issues of the same magazine do not pull punches... even though I don't always agree with his conclusions. When he said, a few months ago, effectively, that the Canon 70-200 L IS zoom was an inadequate lens for the 1DsII I wondered what planet he was on. However, I'd prefer a reasoned argument with someone actually trying to do proper reviews than the terrible ones I generally see.
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Ben Rubinstein
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« Reply #31 on: September 22, 2006, 06:16:01 AM »
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An additional benefit for Hasselblad would of course be that the move would leave Phase One and Leaf out.

No doubt that is exactly their long term stategy. Both Phase One and Leaf should be looking at the dead MF manufacturers to build on for their own all in one packages  or to sell backless bodies otherwise they will be large format only and dead in the water. Fortunately there seems to be no lack of systems/brands going for cheap if only for the blueprints and rights to the names of companies that have already thrown in the towel. Not that contax springs to mind or anything....    Of course there is Mamiya and Bronica and Rollei seem to be stuck in the mire too.

Even as competitors it would make sense for the two companies and maybe others to team together and ensure that Hasselblad are not the only medium format system still alive and well, if only so they can ensure a future...

BTW Yair, Shana Tova!
« Last Edit: September 22, 2006, 06:16:35 AM by pom » Logged

Graham Mitchell
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« Reply #32 on: September 22, 2006, 06:26:16 AM »
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there seems to be no lack of systems/brands going for cheap if only for the blueprints and rights to the names of companies that have already thrown in the towel. Not that contax springs to mind or anything.... 

The problem with Contax seems to be that Kyocera got greedy and would rather make nothing than sell the brand for something.

I totally agree with the rest of your post though. Rollei seems to be the next strongest after Hasselblad, and I am looking forward to their Photokina releases.

I'm sure Mamiya is still in the race but after the change of ownership it might take a while for them to move forward.
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yaya
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« Reply #33 on: September 22, 2006, 07:34:14 AM »
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BTW Yair, Shana Tova!

Thanks Ben and to you too, I hope the sun comes back tomorrow  This English weather is not synched with the Jewish calander  

Yair
« Last Edit: September 22, 2006, 07:34:41 AM by yaya » Logged
eronald
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« Reply #34 on: September 22, 2006, 03:39:22 PM »
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Thanks Ben and to you too, I hope the sun comes back tomorrow  This English weather is not synched with the Jewish calander  

Yair
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Shana Tova, Yair.

Edmund
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Edmund Ronald, Ph.D. 
Nemo
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« Reply #35 on: September 23, 2006, 02:36:48 PM »
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Many MF are disappearing and the few that remain alive are designing integrated (cheaper) cameras. This is the case of Mamiya, Hasselblad or Pentax... and Sinar/Jenoptik(/Rollei?).

Digital Backs Manufacturers try to survive in a shrinking market. These machines are very expensive, and the replacement and upgrading is slow. Phase One and Leaf will be the only independent manufacturers of digital backs, and I doubt they will resist as independent companies much longer...

This Photokina will be very interesting because the new generation of products (adapted to a new strategy) will be presented. Canon has a key role in this defensive strategy, and their new Pro line is important for this market and its future.
« Last Edit: September 24, 2006, 06:41:10 AM by Nemo » Logged
Fritzer
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« Reply #36 on: September 23, 2006, 04:59:13 PM »
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Both Phase One and Leaf should be looking at the dead MF manufacturers to build on for their own all in one packages  or to sell backless bodies otherwise they will be large format only and dead in the water. [a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=77247\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]


Well, I don't know what market share still life photography represents, but it's hardly doable without a view camera, thus requiring a DB with a universal mount.
I sure hope integrated solutions will not be what's left of MF digital offerings in the future....
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izaack
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« Reply #37 on: September 23, 2006, 10:50:49 PM »
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Leaf is an Eastman Kodak subsidiary; autonomous maybe but not independent at all.
« Last Edit: September 23, 2006, 10:51:14 PM by izaack » Logged
eronald
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« Reply #38 on: September 24, 2006, 03:31:35 AM »
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Well, I don't know what market share still life photography represents, but it's hardly doable without a view camera, thus requiring a DB with a universal mount.
I sure hope integrated solutions will not be what's left of MF digital offerings in the future....
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=77433\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

There are solutions available today; in a few years large sensors will be more widely available as  modules, like any other piece of electronic component they will go down in priceand be easier to integrate. This is what happened with the tiny sensors used in consumer cams - anybody can set up a production line using pefab components.

Edmund
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Gary Ferguson
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« Reply #39 on: September 25, 2006, 06:13:05 AM »
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I stumbled across this quote from November 2005, it's from Kornelius Fleischer who is Zeiss's Marketing Manager for camera optics,

"Just back from a trade show in the machine vision industry, I have seen there a square CCD sensor with an image area of 45 mm x 45 mm. And there was not one chip maker showing this device. There were those large square chips from three different companies: Atmel, Dalsa, and Kodak.

One of them hinted at having a 55 x 55 in the thinking"
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