Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: Digital Photo Professional and Photoshop CS2  (Read 3373 times)
aanwar
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 6


« on: August 31, 2006, 11:17:58 PM »
ReplyReply

Hi all!

I have a few question regarding Digital Photo Professional version 2.1.1.4 from Canon.

I have been using the DPP software with CS2 in my workflow.


The raw files are processed with DPP, after I'm done with it,  I used the command Transfer to Photoshop (Alt-P),  the files are then converted into 16 bit Tiff files for further processing with Photoshop.

Finally the files are converted into 8 bit mode for further processing if required and save as jpg files.

The final product of my works are mostly end up in jpg files for used in the web, few are printed out

My question are:

1. Is there a better workflow than what I have been doing in term of a better software or sequence, because I have noticed there is a significant quality loss between the 16 bit tiff files at CS2 compared to the raw files preview at DPP (I used quality priority in the operating mode setting at DPP)

2. When I transfer the file from DPP to CS2, there is a color space conversion made since my setting at DPP is Adobe RGB, and at CS2 is Pro Photo RGB, will this cause the quality loss on my pictures?

3. Is there an upgrade for DPP so that I could used Pro Photo RGB mode in the work color space setting (i've tried searching for it on the net but could not found one)

Thank you for your kind inputs

Warm regards from the tropics

Anton
Logged
budjames
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 697


WWW
« Reply #1 on: September 05, 2006, 04:56:26 AM »
ReplyReply

You have the latest version of Canon DPP.

I gave up using DPP because the interface is cumbersome. With the release of Adobe Lightroom Beta3 for WindowsXP, I started using this program for culling shoots and RAW conversion to ProPhoto RGB. LR uses ACR as its conversion engine. Visit Adobe Labs web site for a free LR B3 download.

The workflow of LR is awesome and if there is no spotting or cloning required, then you can print directly from within LR to PDF or to your printer. The results from my Epson R2400 are fantastic!

It's the easiest and best printing routine I've seen yet. I can't wait for the retail product release.

Bud James
North Wales, PA
« Last Edit: September 05, 2006, 04:57:46 AM by budjames » Logged

Bud James
North Wales, PA
www.budjamesphotography.com
Josh-H
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1911



WWW
« Reply #2 on: September 05, 2006, 05:17:59 AM »
ReplyReply

My 2 Cents...

Quote
1. Is there a better workflow than what I have been doing in term of a better software or sequence, because I have noticed there is a significant quality loss between the 16 bit tiff files at CS2 compared to the raw files preview at DPP (I used quality priority in the operating mode setting at DPP)

U are using the right setting in DPP - you should NOT be seeing a quality loss when transfering to PS CS from DPP. DPP transfers the RAW file by processing it with any changes you made to a 16 bit Tiff file - there SHOULD be NO appreciable drop in image quality. This MAY be related to your PS color space settings.... [maybee...]

Quote
2. When I transfer the file from DPP to CS2, there is a color space conversion made since my setting at DPP is Adobe RGB, and at CS2 is Pro Photo RGB, will this cause the quality loss on my pictures?

I cant say for sure if this is the case - it needs someone with more color management knowledge than I possess. However, in general unless you have a REALLY good reason to have PS set to Pro Photo RGB you should be using SRGB or Adobe RGB depending on your required output needs. If I were you I would try setting PS to Adobe RGB and see how your transfers work out. I do it this way with the same workflow you mentioned above and get brilliant results. I have found no need to work in Pro Photo RGB to date for my needs. Once I have the 16 bit Tiff in PS from DPP [No sharpening applied in DPP!!!!!! - but I do my cropping in DPP and basic white balance, exposure correction and SOME contrast curves work] then I will do some capture sharpening with Photokit sharpener followed by any more detailed processing work I want to do to the image [if any] - then its creative sharpen if required [again with PhotoKit plug in] - then I will save it and decide what ouuput I need.

A: If its off to the printer then I will sharpen with Photokit output sharpen specific for printing and voila..

B: If for web - I will untick color management if uploading to my live-books website or if emailing etc. convert to SRGB.

Quote
3. Is there an upgrade for DPP so that I could used Pro Photo RGB mode in the work color space setting (i've tried searching for it on the net but could not found one)

You are using the latest version - but look for a new release late this month with the 400D.

BTW: My workflow above is being supercded by Lightroom - take Budjames advice and downloaded a BETA 3 and try it.
Logged

aanwar
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 6


« Reply #3 on: September 14, 2006, 01:46:39 AM »
ReplyReply

thank you guys for all the inputs,

For the moment I changed the color setting in CS2 to adobe RGB, it seems that the quality loss is better than before.
 
in a close up human potrait photo the loss is still significant but in a landscape pics with less detail (like clear blue sky and a green field from far) the loss is not so much.

I'll have a go with lightroom as suggested

cheers
Logged
dwdallam
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2044



WWW
« Reply #4 on: September 15, 2006, 04:08:55 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote
thank you guys for all the inputs,

For the moment I changed the color setting in CS2 to adobe RGB, it seems that the quality loss is better than before.
 
in a close up human potrait photo the loss is still significant but in a landscape pics with less detail (like clear blue sky and a green field from far) the loss is not so much.

I'll have a go with lightroom as suggested

cheers
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=76287\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Why not try editing in Adobe's RAW processor? It's pretty easy after you understand the terms. The terms can be defined simply by doing a few searches in Google. Last, even if you don't really understand the terms, the sliders give you visual clues as to what they are doing, and you can trust your eyes in this respect and ignore the definitions. I read a book on Adobe RAW, and these are my notes:

1) Is there any advantage to using PSCS2 Photo filters when you are shooting and using Adobe Raw? No.
2) Is there any image degradation adjusting white balance in Adobe Raw as compared to setting the white balance manually with a gray card in the camera? No, or at least much less than when in PS.

RAW Workflow

Tabs are in fairly logical order.

1) EXPOSURE: Although third down, this is what you need to get right before going to white balance IF you need more than a .25 exposure adjustment. If less, than use WB first. Affects entire tonal range, but is mainly a white balance tool.

2) WHITE BALANCE: White Balance: If only a small exposure adjustment is needed, then set white balance first.
(a)   Temperature: Tint = white balance. Temperature = blue (cold) ----- yellow (warm)
(   Tint: green ----- red
©   White balance sampler: Use this sometimes to get a rough WB, then use temperature. Do not sample a specular highlight however.

Exposure and white balance are critical to RAW.

3) BRIGHTNESS & CONTRAST:  Shapes entire tonality of image.
(a)   Shadows are presented before this slider, but most of the time better to do this first because shadows is a black point set point and will have big changes in the entire image.
(   Brightness first: Changes midtown brightness w/o changing end point tonal range.
©   Contrast second: positive brightens values above the midpoint set by brightness and darkens values below that midpoint. Negative settings darken values above mid point and brightens those below.
IN BOTH CASES BRIGHTNESS AND CONTRAST DO NOT CHANGE THE END POINTS—black and white points.
(d)   Contrast will have a more obvious effect on the darker ¾ tones than the brighter values.
(e)   To brighten the dark ¾ tones w/o affecting midtones, reduce contrast. It is better than using brightness. If image goes flat, use shadows to get it back.

4) SHADOWS: sets black point, and has big effect on image!
(a)   If shadows have important detail, set to zero or leave at least some headroom. Then use P.S. for finer control.

5) DETAIL
(a)   Sharpness: preview only. Use PS for sharpening.

6) LUMINANCE SMOOTHING
(a)   Luminance noise is random speckled variations in tone that usually increase with ISO speed. Noise of this sort is more concentrated in darker zones. Simply raise the slider until it disappears. Does impact sharpening.

7) COLOR NOISE REDUCTION
(a)   Random magenta and green splotches in the dark areas, or, in some cameras, around highlights. Raise slider until it goes away. Has less impact on sharpness than luminance smoothing. Default is good all around.

NOTE: ENLARGE and PAN to see effects of both, or you will not see them.

Cool LENS TAB: Chromatic Aberration: little effect on entire image.
RC = Red/Cyan fringing
BY=Blue/Yellow fringing
Logged

Pages: [1]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad