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Author Topic: Thailand Locations??  (Read 30364 times)
mike517x
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« on: September 29, 2006, 03:19:41 PM »
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On 10/31,I leave  for a 4 week tour of Thailand.
I arrive in Bangkok,then travel north to ChiangMai,I will be in Chiang Mai for 8 days.
I return to Bangkok,then go south for 2 weeks to Hua Hin.
  Can anyone recommend some places of interest to do some photography,as this is my first trip to SouthEast Asia.
Thanks for your help,
Mike
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Lisa Nikodym
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« Reply #1 on: September 29, 2006, 06:04:52 PM »
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The major temple complexes of Bangkok have much interesting photogenic architecture, utterly different from the western tradition.

If you like photographing photogenic old ruins, an easy day trip by train from Bangkok is to Ayutthaya (there are various ways it's spelled in English etc.), an earlier important capital of Thailand (back vaguely around the 1600's or so, if I recall correctly); it has endless old temples in various states of decay that are a lot of fun to wander about.

Haven't been to northern Thailand or the Hua Hin area, so no comments on those.  If you can get farther south to Phang Nga Bay, however, it's incredibly photogenic, with cliff-edged small jungle islands you can visit by boat.

I was there several years ago, and found excellent food in Bangkok in a nice little restaurant called "Tongue Thai" (I promise the food is better than the name!) on a side street a couple of blocks from the Mandarin Oriental Hotel.  "Hot Lime Sauce Beef", yummmmm!

Be prepared for serious heat and humidity, though.

Lisa
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willow
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« Reply #2 on: September 30, 2006, 01:42:04 AM »
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On 10/31,I leave  for a 4 week tour of Thailand.
I arrive in Bangkok,then travel north to ChiangMai,I will be in Chiang Mai for 8 days.
I return to Bangkok,then go south for 2 weeks to Hua Hin.
  Can anyone recommend some places of interest to do some photography,as this is my first trip to SouthEast Asia.
Thanks for your help,
Mike
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Hi Mike

It depends what you are looking for. There is a awful lot to see.

How did you plan to travel around? Hire a car, Bus or Fly? Its along way from BKK to Chang Mai, Hau Hin is only a short trip from BKK.

 
Try these sites:

[a href=\"http://www.photographythailand.com/Forum/]http://www.photographythailand.com/Forum/[/url]
Mark Shultz's site, Register and ask members mostly living in Thailand.

http://www.trekearth.com/gallery/Asia/Thailand/
Type in your final destinations for other peoples images of those areas.

http://www.thaivisa.com/

Is the 2 weeks in Hua hin a "beach" holiday? If so, I would follow Lisas advice and go further south, Phang Nga Bay is the location of James Bond Island. The waters and beaches are cleaner also.

I extremly doubt if Lisa's nice little restaurant called "Tongue Thai" is still there though.java script:emoticon('Sad')
smilie


Philip
« Last Edit: September 30, 2006, 01:43:50 AM by willow » Logged
Mark D Segal
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« Reply #3 on: September 30, 2006, 11:41:50 AM »
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Mike,

If you have flexibility in your itinerary and timing, I would recommend some changes. 8 days in Chiang Mai is too much time for the town alone. The interesting part of it is within the town walls and this is a rather small area that you can cover adequately for both tourism and photos over a couple of days. A must while there is an excursion to Doi Suthep. This is the key highlight of Chiang Mai.

Bangkok is worth AT LEAST a week, because it is just so rich in temple complexes and palaces, markets, outdoor stuff worth photographing (Chinatown day and night for example) - one of those inexhaustible cities unless you are living there.

Lisa's suggestion to go to Ayutthaya is a very good one, but not by train. Ayutthaya is actually a very large area with a number of different complexes that are worth seeing and photographing, but you need transportation to get from one to the other. She is right about the heat and humidity - it is deadly under conditions of over-exertion if you are not accustomed to it. The best thing is to go in an organized bus tour that covers all the highlights there. Download some info about it from the net and select a tour that covers the key places - including the country Royal Palace complex.

Also a most important spot that you should NOT MISS is the Sukhothai area. You can fly there with Bangkok Airways (good airline) from BKK. Once there, you spend two days, and hire a driver to take you to the complexes of Sukhothai Historic Park and Sisatchanalai Historic Park, where there are huge photographic opportunities of ancient ruins embedded in rich oriental landscapes. This is the historic heart of ancient Siam and has informed a certain amount of modern Thai architecture giving a modern idiom to these ancient styles. Which reminds me - while in Bangkok visit the Sukhothai Hotel - a very special place.

It's a wonderful country with much to do, well organized for tourism, and people are gentle and helpful. If you do run into any issues - one word of advice - it is a culture which does not tolerate confrontation especially from outsiders - settle everything low-key with a smile. Enjoy.
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mike517x
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« Reply #4 on: September 30, 2006, 03:40:52 PM »
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Mike,

If you have flexibility in your itinerary and timing, I would recommend some changes. 8 days in Chiang Mai is too much time for the town alone. The interesting part of it is within the town walls and this is a rather small area that you can cover adequately for both tourism and photos over a couple of days. A must while there is an excursion to Doi Suthep. This is the key highlight of Chiang Mai.

Bangkok is worth AT LEAST a week, because it is just so rich in temple complexes and palaces, markets, outdoor stuff worth photographing (Chinatown day and night for example) - one of those inexhaustible cities unless you are living there.

Lisa's suggestion to go to Ayutthaya is a very good one, but not by train. Ayutthaya is actually a very large area with a number of different complexes that are worth seeing and photographing, but you need transportation to get from one to the other. She is right about the heat and humidity - it is deadly under conditions of over-exertion if you are not accustomed to it. The best thing is to go in an organized bus tour that covers all the highlights there. Download some info about it from the net and select a tour that covers the key places - including the country Royal Palace complex.

Also a most important spot that you should NOT MISS is the Sukhothai area. You can fly there with Bangkok Airways (good airline) from BKK. Once there, you spend two days, and hire a driver to take you to the complexes of Sukhothai Historic Park and Sisatchanalai Historic Park, where there are huge photographic opportunities of ancient ruins embedded in rich oriental landscapes. This is the historic heart of ancient Siam and has informed a certain amount of modern Thai architecture giving a modern idiom to these ancient styles. Which reminds me - while in Bangkok visit the Sukhothai Hotel - a very special place.

It's a wonderful country with much to do, well organized for tourism, and people are gentle and helpful. If you do run into any issues - one word of advice - it is a culture which does not tolerate confrontation especially from outsiders - settle everything low-key with a smile. Enjoy.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=78435\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]



   Hi Again,
Want to thank all of you for your thorough replies and info.
Yes ,this is a tour starting in NY ,I got connected with one of the Thai communities here in NYC.
Chiang mai,is just one of the cities we will be visiting in northern Thailand,and yes,this is a bus tour.We land in Bangkok,stay 1 night,then fly to Chiang Mia.
So the first 8 days we will be visiting a few other cities in the north.
Then we are on our own.
One question though...I was told that this time of year .. is the Thai winter....should I expect very humid ,and hot weather,as you said?
Also,I'm bring 1 dslr,and 3 lenses,do you think that this might be overkill...I Do not want to be lugging around my camera bag,if its 105 degrees?
 Lisa,I'll let you know if I find your favorite restuarant??? "tongue Thai"{very clever}
Thanks Again;
Mike
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Mark D Segal
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« Reply #5 on: September 30, 2006, 05:43:46 PM »
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I've been in Thailand ten times over a two year period, and let me assure you that the concept of "winter" is relative. If you are North American or EUropean, the place is hot and humid year round - it just gets a wee-bit less so this time of the year. Your gear is not overkill. The photo ops are extremely varied so you will use everything from  wide angle to telephoto.  Once you are on your own after Chiang Mai, this is how I would arrange the rest of the trip if it were me (because I've done it all except the South - I'm not a beach/sea person): I suggest you fly Bangkok Airways from there to Sukhothai, spend a couple of days there, then if you like World Class Monumental History, take Bangkok Airways from Sukhothai to BKK, transfer in BKK to Siem Riep Cambodia where you can spend a couple of days doing the Angkor Wat complex (need to hire a driver, the place is huge). I took hundreds of photos there - the place is UNBELIEVABLE until you've been there to experience the sheer scale and drama of it yourself. Once in that part of the World if that kind of stuff interests you it is a MUST. Then fly back to BKK for a week there, and finish up in the South.
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mike517x
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« Reply #6 on: October 01, 2006, 02:47:23 PM »
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I've been in Thailand ten times over a two year period, and let me assure you that the concept of "winter" is relative. If you are North American or EUropean, the place is hot and humid year round - it just gets a wee-bit less so this time of the year. Your gear is not overkill. The photo ops are extremely varied so you will use everything from  wide angle to telephoto.  Once you are on your own after Chiang Mai, this is how I would arrange the rest of the trip if it were me (because I've done it all except the South - I'm not a beach/sea person): I suggest you fly Bangkok Airways from there to Sukhothai, spend a couple of days there, then if you like World Class Monumental History, take Bangkok Airways from Sukhothai to BKK, transfer in BKK to Siem Riep Cambodia where you can spend a couple of days doing the Angkor Wat complex (need to hire a driver, the place is huge). I took hundreds of photos there - the place is UNBELIEVABLE until you've been there to experience the sheer scale and drama of it yourself. Once in that part of the World if that kind of stuff interests you it is a MUST. Then fly back to BKK for a week there, and finish up in the South.
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   Markds,
Thanks,more great info...
Yes,I was mis-informed about the weather,I did a google check and they said 18-32C...in Bangkok...the north, a little cooler-you were right.

I will definetly take your advise,and try to get over to Cambodia,this trip,if not ,next year.
My girlfriend {who was born in Bangkok}has not been home for 24 years,so,she has some catching up to do .{relatives,and school buddies}
My gear is simple,a canon dslr,a 17-40L,a 70-200L,nd a 50mmF1.8 for indoor shots.
  I'll post some shots when I return,and let you know how I made out.
Thanks again,
Mike
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Mark D Segal
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« Reply #7 on: October 01, 2006, 06:00:46 PM »
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Mike,

Have a very good, safe trip and enjoy yourselves. Looking forward to seeing the photos.

Mark
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Peter Bangkok
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« Reply #8 on: October 02, 2006, 12:16:25 AM »
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Hi Mike,
Sure it will be an exciting trip.

As mentioned earlier Bangkok and Thailand streetscape offer plenty of photo opportunities. Midday sun is very hard but morning and late afternoon has nice lights. Dont forget to just head out to some small town that is not on the tourist map, early mornings, eat some rice porridge and enjoy the atmosphere.

Around Hua Hin you have Kaeng Krachan National Park as well as Sam Roi Yod National Park, the last one in nearby Pranburi. Both offer good nature photography.

Both Ayutthaya and Sukhothai were mentioned. Ayutthaya is worthwile to take a tour, there by bus and back by boat on the river. Very nice to float down the chao praya river and arrive in Bangkok.

If you feel your camera bag is too light you may want to top up on equipment at www.fotofile.net, they also arrange 7% VAT return when you depart the country.

Thai people are very polite by nature, dont forget to return that politeness when taking photos.

Lastly a warning! You may like it so much here you may return over and over again.

Enjoy your trip,
Peter
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mike517x
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« Reply #9 on: October 03, 2006, 12:57:10 AM »
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Hi Mike,
Sure it will be an exciting trip.

As mentioned earlier Bangkok and Thailand streetscape offer plenty of photo opportunities. Midday sun is very hard but morning and late afternoon has nice lights. Dont forget to just head out to some small town that is not on the tourist map, early mornings, eat some rice porridge and enjoy the atmosphere.

Around Hua Hin you have Kaeng Krachan National Park as well as Sam Roi Yod National Park, the last one in nearby Pranburi. Both offer good nature photography.

Both Ayutthaya and Sukhothai were mentioned. Ayutthaya is worthwile to take a tour, there by bus and back by boat on the river. Very nice to float down the chao praya river and arrive in Bangkok.

If you feel your camera bag is too light you may want to top up on equipment at www.fotofile.net, they also arrange 7% VAT return when you depart the country.

Thai people are very polite by nature, dont forget to return that politeness when taking photos.

Lastly a warning! You may like it so much here you may return over and over again.

Enjoy your trip,
Peter
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Hi Peter,
Thanks for the info about the river trip back to Bangkok..I will definetly take it.
   NO,NO,NO on topping off my camera bag!!!I'm in hot water already,we dont want to go there...if you know what I mean??
I'll post some shots ,when I return.
Thanks Again,
Mike
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« Reply #10 on: October 03, 2006, 09:08:29 AM »
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Mike,

I forgot to mention to you - when in BKK there are two important sites - the Grand Palace and Wat Pho (one is just down the street from the other) that you should do first thing in the morning - i.e. get to the ticket booth before they open. You will need most a morning for each. The reasons are: (1) primarily these places are seriously over-run by literally 1000s of tourists daily photographing eachother in front of the very places where you would like to make serious photographs; therefore you need to get there before most of them do. (2) The heat - you are walking around in large uncovered expanses of extremely hot air and pavement - by the way take a hat and bottled water. It is a bit more bearable in the early morning. (3) The light - the quality of the light around 8:30 AM is very nice and begins to get too harsh by around 10:30.

Mark
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mike517x
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« Reply #11 on: October 05, 2006, 03:46:15 PM »
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Mike,

I forgot to mention to you - when in BKK there are two important sites - the Grand Palace and Wat Pho (one is just down the street from the other) that you should do first thing in the morning - i.e. get to the ticket booth before they open. You will need most a morning for each. The reasons are: (1) primarily these places are seriously over-run by literally 1000s of tourists daily photographing eachother in front of the very places where you would like to make serious photographs; therefore you need to get there before most of them do. (2) The heat - you are walking around in large uncovered expanses of extremely hot air and pavement - by the way take a hat and bottled water. It is a bit more bearable in the early morning. (3) The light - the quality of the light around 8:30 AM is very nice and begins to get too harsh by around 10:30.

Mark
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   Hi Mark,
Thanks for this info...actually  my better half is familar with these 2 temples....she grew up in this area.
However ,I will take your advise and get there early,we were told to get there around 11am.Is this info incorrect?
RSVP-me on this if you can,as I do want to visit these two temples.
Mike
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« Reply #12 on: October 05, 2006, 08:03:40 PM »
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Hi Mark,
Thanks for this info...actually  my better half is familar with these 2 temples....she grew up in this area.
However ,I will take your advise and get there early,we were told to get there around 11am.Is this info incorrect?
RSVP-me on this if you can,as I do want to visit these two temples.
Mike
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Mike they open at 8:30 AM, close at noon and open again at 13:30.
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« Reply #13 on: December 13, 2006, 06:43:53 PM »
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As you will probably be returning to Thailand, the suggestion to take a side trip to "Siem Riep Cambodia where you can spend a couple of days doing the Angkor Wat complex" is a great one. The complex is the most impressive sight in all my travels throughout the world. There are air travel tours of Vietnam, Cambodia, and Thailand, similar to the old days of England, France, and Germany, that are quite reasonable.

In addition to the photo gear you mentioned I would also take a small flash unit. The insides of the temples can be quite dark and well as the market places and other spots for photography and a little flash goes a long way to adding light and brightening colors.
I would also take a laptop and burn my images to DVDs during the course of the trip and travel with the DVDs in a separate piece of luggage. I take a plastic case that holds 10 blank DVDs and burn them as I go. The images are on the laptop and on the DVDs so I have an excellent chance of bringing them home with me.

Bruce
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Mark D Segal
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« Reply #14 on: December 13, 2006, 07:25:10 PM »
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Frankly, DVDs are not the best idea for image back-up. They can be unreliable due to burn problems and issues with the media itself. This technology is not as matured as CD-burning. I travel with a laptop for sure, with a large enough internal hard-drive to contain my whole photo shoot. As well I have a small LaCie portable USB drive 80 GB - it is about the size of a pack of cigarettes, has more than enough capacity and works very well off the laptop. I download everything from the laptop to the Lacie. Thirdly, I keep a set of RAW files in my Epson P-2000 up to its capacity. This takes CF cards directly, or can work with the laptop.
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« Reply #15 on: December 13, 2006, 09:00:18 PM »
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Frankly, DVDs are not the best idea for image back-up. They can be unreliable due to burn problems and issues with the media itself. This technology is not as matured as CD-burning. I travel with a laptop for sure, with a large enough internal hard-drive to contain my whole photo shoot. As well I have a small LaCie portable USB drive 80 GB - it is about the size of a pack of cigarettes, has more than enough capacity and works very well off the laptop. I download everything from the laptop to the Lacie. Thirdly, I keep a set of RAW files in my Epson P-2000 up to its capacity. This takes CF cards directly, or can work with the laptop.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=90402\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

I returned from my Thailand trip,and just wante to say thank you for all your help,and advise.
You were right...It's hot!!!..In a hasty moment,I managed to DELETE 2gbs of shots from my memeory card by mistake.I was reviewing a shot I had just taken ,and went to delete it..and hit the delete ALL button.A word of cautuon to anyone going to Thailand,sometimes the heat can to you..make sure you review your images when you are well rested,and in a air conditioned space.
Here's a few images I did mange to keep.[attachment=1359:attachment][attachment=1360:attachment][attachment=1361:at
tachment][attachment=1362:attachment][attachment=1363:attachment][attachment=1364
:attachment][attachment=1365:attachment]
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« Reply #16 on: December 13, 2006, 09:39:06 PM »
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Mike,

Sorry to hear about the misfortune of losing all those shots, especially as the ones you posted are very attractive. That is so frustrating. This unfortunate experience reinforces my paranoia about deleting anything on a CF card until the whole thing is backed-up in at least two other places. I thought maybe I am a bit "hyper", but your story confirms strict adherence to this practice. Yes, the heat in Bangkok can cause one to make mistakes. Now, if you are using Sandisk (and perhaps this works for others too - I don't know) and  if you haven't over-written that card yet, Sandisk provides a utility called RescuePRO Recovery Software that may be helpful for such rescue operations. They say: "Esnures your photos will always be there (even if you accidentally delete them) - your case exactly. They say to visit: www.lc-tech.com/rescuepro or phone 1.866.603.2195 for their tech support hotline.

Turning to the stuff that did work: could you please tell us where these were taken - especially the large white temple, and the one with the two decorated cement elephants.
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Mark D Segal (formerly MarkDS)
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mike517x
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« Reply #17 on: December 14, 2006, 05:20:16 AM »
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Mike,

Sorry to hear about the misfortune of losing all those shots, especially as the ones you posted are very attractive. That is so frustrating. This unfortunate experience reinforces my paranoia about deleting anything on a CF card until the whole thing is backed-up in at least two other places. I thought maybe I am a bit "hyper", but your story confirms strict adherence to this practice. Yes, the heat in Bangkok can cause one to make mistakes. Now, if you are using Sandisk (and perhaps this works for others too - I don't know) and  if you haven't over-written that card yet, Sandisk provides a utility called RescuePRO Recovery Software that may be helpful for such rescue operations. They say: "Esnures your photos will always be there (even if you accidentally delete them) - your case exactly. They say to visit: www.lc-tech.com/rescuepro or phone 1.866.603.2195 for their tech support hotline.

Turning to the stuff that did work: could you please tell us where these were taken - especially the large white temple, and the one with the two decorated cement elephants.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=90427\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Mark..thank you for that info about rescuepro recovery.
We did 9 temples in 7 days..and...to be honest ..I was a little Templed-out,but the white temple was really something to see.


The white temple,or"Wat Rong Karn"..was taken in Chiang Mai.
  The Buddha shot was taken in ChiangRai,very near to the Burmese border,the golden triangle area.
Here's a few more images from the White Temple area..same location
Mike[attachment=1367:attachment][attachment=1368:attachment]
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« Reply #18 on: December 14, 2006, 07:33:36 AM »
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Thanks alot Mike. We missed that temple when we were in Chiang Mai - maybe there will be a next time. Looks like a great site.
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« Reply #19 on: December 15, 2006, 09:11:56 AM »
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I just returned yesterday from one month at Siem Rieap, one month in Nepal mostly trekking in the mountains, and 3 weeks in Thailand. I took with me a very compact Dell laptop with 80GB HD & DVD drive, a LaCie pocket 100GB external drive and about 20 blank DVD discs.

Before I left Cambodia, I'd filled the LaCie external drive, used all the blank DVDs and had to buy another 25 DVD spindle of blanks in Siem Reap.

As a rough estimate, I've shot about 200GB of images on my 5D and 20D, all recorded twice on a combination of either the LaCie external drive, the laptop HD and/or DVD disk.

The temples around Angkor Wat are the most amazing photographic opportunity on the planet, but there's one major drawback... those damned tourists!  

They get in the way all the time. It seems everyone wants to be photographed standing next to, or in front of, anything amazing and wonderful. Sometimes a tourist guide leading a group of 20 or so Koreans carries a bag containing all members' P&S cameras. The whole group will pose in front of some amazing root structure growing over a ruined temple, and the guide will slowly take a photo with each member's camera, sometimes having difficulty operating the camera, which causes further delay. In the meantime, yours truly is waiting patiently in the wings for the crowd to disperse, wondering if any purpose will be served by returning half an hour later, by which time another group might well have taken the place of the first group.

BTW, I lost 10kgs trekking in Nepal. Better than any diet   .
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