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Author Topic: New H3D full frame!!!  (Read 76659 times)
michael
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« Reply #20 on: September 30, 2006, 08:04:58 PM »
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On the first day of Photokina at least two different booth reps stated catagorically to me and to others that the H2 would be discontinued as soon as production quantities on the H3D were sufficient.

There was so much outraged buzz about this on the show floor that by the next day and the Hasselblad press conference this was toned down to be "we'll make them as long as there's demand".

Not a statement that instills much confidence, at least in me.

Michael
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ronno
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« Reply #21 on: September 30, 2006, 08:53:27 PM »
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There was so much outraged buzz about this on the show floor that by the next day and the Hasselblad press conference this was toned down to be "we'll make them as long as there's demand".

[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=78493\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

I agree this is too bad, to limit choice like this in an already small and struggling MF digital market.

In any case, any company that charges $2000 for film back and I.M.O. crazy prices for the rest of their products is honestly already off my list.
I used to use Hasselblad, but haven't in a while, and now they seem to be losing their minds more and more.

-ron
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« Reply #22 on: September 30, 2006, 09:15:56 PM »
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In any case, any company that charges $2000 for film back and I.M.O. crazy prices for the rest of their products is honestly already off my list.

[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=78499\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

i could not agree more...i did not think hasselblad did anyone a favour by releasing a completely overpriced, ergonimically horrific counterpart to the very good, compact, solid mamiya 645af...i never liked the H1/2 to begin with and i always felt that if you force someone to rotate the camera, at least make it as small and as light as possible (like the mamiya or contax)....the success of the H1 has IMHO less to do with the actual quality of the product, but more with the marketing hype (unseen before in the MF world) and the demise of the competition, who simply cound not get their s*%$# together....just like it seems now that the timing seeems a bit off with the H3D and the Hy6 going head to head...hasslblad marketing is going strong already (i have already received 4 emails), rollei marketing is also as usual...i have yet to actually see a pic of the camera with the rollei name on it...of course no email...and i own 2 6008AFs and several lenses....
anyway seems like hasselblad really shot themselves in the foot with this one
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« Reply #23 on: September 30, 2006, 10:50:14 PM »
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Don't bet against Hasselblad succeeding.

It is all going down to marketing muscle and technical service and support. When your camera system fails in the middle of a shoot or before a big wedding gig tomorrow, you need to be able to rent or get it repaired fast. When you need that lens for that particular gig, you need to be able to rent it. Hasselblad has traditionally been very strong in its support and marketing. Its marketing is already in place and the H3D is ready to ship NOW.

Rollei-Sinar has traditionally been very poor in marketing and support. Who is able to rent Rollei equipment even in New York City? After HP Marketing dropped Rollei, what has happened to its service and support? Where is the marketing muscle?

Technological pizzaz alone just won't cut it. Working photographers need solutions which work right now out of the box. Their paid gigs won't wait till April 07. It remains to be seen how reliable the Hy6 is. I don't see working photographers counting on an untested camera system for at least one year after its launch. And that gives Hasselblad a one and half year head start to gain market share at least. Hobbyists can wait; professionals can't.

I expect Hasselblad to offer very attractive trade-in incentives for photographers to switch to its backs. Hasselblad may have to take a loss initially but it will do so to gain market share.

If you take a look at it, all the backs from the different makers are all based on either Kodak or Dalsa chips. The only difference lies in the software and this is something that Hasselblad will resolve eventually.

Honestly, I don't think that Rollei stands much of a chance despite its technologically superior product. Until they work on their marketing and set up a network of support, the only ones to drool over the HY6 are camera geeks like me. Not all working photographers are camera geeks although most are. When it comes down to brass tacks for paid gigs, they need solutions which work with the least amount of fuss and compatibility problems. The Hy6 looks very attractive to me. But when the initial excitement wears off it is time to take a more austere look at it. Looks great but can I count on you? How reliable are you? How well are you supported? Those are the pressing questions beyond technological pizzaz.

Amongst my peers, the Hasselblad integrated all-in-one solution is the one they want. No fuss, minimum muss. The world of wedding, lifestyle and fashion pros works on a very tight timeline with little room for retakes. Of course, fine-art, landscape and hobbyist photographers will have a different take on this but how large is this market? Michael is writing from the perspective of a landscape photographer and his coterie of well-heeled friends, a few of whom may sell the occasional landscape or two or many. Their needs may not mirror the needs of the major market that Hasselblad is targetting.

Despite the anger shown against Hasselblad on this forum, I suspect that when the dust settles, Poulsen will have the last laugh. He is taking a huge gamble but it is an educated one based on his knowledge of the US market. I don't know about the Europeans but Rollei isn't strong there either. And Asia tends to follow the lead of the Americans.
« Last Edit: September 30, 2006, 11:04:16 PM by izaack » Logged
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« Reply #24 on: September 30, 2006, 10:57:03 PM »
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Who in God's name legitimately needs to make a back with a chip larger than 39MP???

39MP yields Raw files in 8 bit that are roughly  100MB, 16bit 200MB, - equivalent to drum scanned 4x5. This is getting ridiculous.

I for one, a person who makes my living daily creating images finds this talk of even larger chips utter folly.

Those of you who are independently wealthy and/or have the time to kill taking positions on the need for this stuff obviously are more concerned with hardware and less with creating marketable images. Fine, that I guess could be a good pastime.

As for MR's commments regarding Hasselblad's decision to make a "closed" system. Who bloody cares about the ethics of this decision. They're a business in a rarified marketplace, and they will succeed or fail on their choice of direction. MR seems to have picked Phase because he has a friend at Phase who likes to go on trips with him to test equipment. Fine it's a good back that makes fine images - just like Leaf, Hasselblad and Eyelike. It's up to Phase to figure out how to compete with this latest turn of events and win over the pros. That's the world of business. It's a competitive world , where innovation rules - it's the captialistic way. If people agree with MR and don't like what Hasselblad is doing, then they won't buy. If they do, then Hasselblad made a proper business decision.

Personally, I buy equipment that allows me to make the best quality images possible, period. If someone, like say, Nikon decides they're not going to manufacture full frame 35mm digital and I want full frame 35mm digital, I switch to Canon, which I did after 30 years of using Nikon. That's reality. That's the consumer deciding what works best for his particular needs. A year ago I was torn between Leaf and Hasselblad 22MP backs - both make great images. I chose Hasselblad specifically because they were integrated with a camera system, and I suspected they'd make advances in the evolution of  lens distortion correction technology. It was a predictable and logical progression. Now it's up to the other MF manufacturer's to figure out how to compete.

As for Victor turning in his grave? That depends on whether his company (and his name) end up stronger or slowly weakens and fades away (say, like Mamiya, Contax, Rollei) in the end doesn't it, really?





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If H3 is rated as full frame, what will happen in 20 months time when Dalsa and Kodak bring out real full frame? In Michael's interview with ceo Phase One I think the line was "It's going to be 20 months before a bigger chip is available so we developed the P+ backs while we wait" or similar.

Damien.
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« Reply #25 on: September 30, 2006, 10:57:13 PM »
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..the success of the H1 has IMHO less to do with the actual quality of the product, but more with the marketing hype (unseen before in the MF world) and the demise of the competition, who simply cound not get their s*%$# together....just like it seems now that the timing seeems a bit off with the H3D and the Hy6 going head to head...hasslblad marketing is going strong already (i have already received 4 emails), rollei marketing is also as usual...i have yet to actually see a pic of the camera with the rollei name on it...of course no email...and i own 2 6008AFs and several lenses....
anyway seems like hasselblad really shot themselves in the foot with this one
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=78504\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

But let's look at Rollei for a while. They obviously have been working closely with Leaf and Phase One with Sinar at the planning table. So shouldnt there be enough pressure, brains and money to get the Hy6 out fast. After all 3 digital backs are depending on it! Or these guys cannot get together enough to do that?

For me I have two questions:

1. When can we expect a Hy6 in the stores?

2. Will we have to commit to the back or will there be adapters or adaption possible?

Asher Kelman
« Last Edit: September 30, 2006, 10:58:29 PM by med007 » Logged

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izaack
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« Reply #26 on: September 30, 2006, 11:06:53 PM »
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My sentiments exactly, Richard.
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« Reply #27 on: September 30, 2006, 11:34:23 PM »
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Just when I thought Hasselblad "gets" it ... when they came out with the attractively priced CFV back for those of us who still have 203 and 205 bodies .... and they provided a reasonably priced upgrade for us H1 users to an H2  ... they go and close the system (even to those of us who have a full set of the H series lenses).  The last major company to do that was IBM when they developed a proprietary bus to lock out all the other manufacturers who made product for the generic ISA bus ... and we see where it got them ... they went out of the PC manufacturing business years ago.  Hopefully Hasselblad will rethink their strategy .... and fire the ignorant marketing person who dreamed up this less than original idea.  Historically, monopolies have never worked in the longterm.  
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« Reply #28 on: September 30, 2006, 11:50:31 PM »
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First, we gotta find a coterie of East Asian clones which is able to manufacture camera systems of comparable reliability and support at keen price points to Hasselblad's that working photographers will want to bet their careers on.

Doesn't look like that is gonna happen. As for monopolies and oligopolies, remember Coca-Cola and the Seven Sisters (now Six)?

You may argue that Hasselblad isn't a soft-drink company but I will counter that Hasselblad isn't a computer company either. Different business, different dynamics. Don't need to go to Harvard Business School to know that.

Time will tell if that 'ignorant' marketing guy is really all that ignorant.
« Last Edit: September 30, 2006, 11:53:50 PM by izaack » Logged
ronno
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« Reply #29 on: October 01, 2006, 12:32:18 AM »
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Does anyone know how Hassy will prevent others from making backs which work with their new H3 cameras?
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« Reply #30 on: October 01, 2006, 01:48:40 AM »
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Don't bet against Hasselblad succeeding.

It is all going down to marketing muscle and technical service and support. When your camera system fails in the middle of a shoot or before a big wedding gig tomorrow, you need to be able to rent or get it repaired fast. When you need that lens for that particular gig, you need to be able to rent it. Hasselblad has traditionally been very strong in its support and marketing. Its marketing is already in place and the H3D is ready to ship NOW.

Rollei-Sinar has traditionally been very poor in marketing and support. Who is able to rent Rollei equipment even in New York City? After HP Marketing dropped Rollei, what has happened to its service and support? Where is the marketing muscle?

Technological pizzaz alone just won't cut it. Working photographers need solutions which work right now out of the box. Their paid gigs won't wait till April 07. It remains to be seen how reliable the Hy6 is. I don't see working photographers counting on an untested camera system for at least one year after its launch. And that gives Hasselblad a one and half year head start to gain market share at least. Hobbyists can wait; professionals can't.

I expect Hasselblad to offer very attractive trade-in incentives for photographers to switch to its backs. Hasselblad may have to take a loss initially but it will do so to gain market share.

If you take a look at it, all the backs from the different makers are all based on either Kodak or Dalsa chips. The only difference lies in the software and this is something that Hasselblad will resolve eventually.

Honestly, I don't think that Rollei stands much of a chance despite its technologically superior product. Until they work on their marketing and set up a network of support, the only ones to drool over the HY6 are camera geeks like me. Not all working photographers are camera geeks although most are. When it comes down to brass tacks for paid gigs, they need solutions which work with the least amount of fuss and compatibility problems. The Hy6 looks very attractive to me. But when the initial excitement wears off it is time to take a more austere look at it. Looks great but can I count on you? How reliable are you? How well are you supported? Those are the pressing questions beyond technological pizzaz.

Amongst my peers, the Hasselblad integrated all-in-one solution is the one they want. No fuss, minimum muss. The world of wedding, lifestyle and fashion pros works on a very tight timeline with little room for retakes. Of course, fine-art, landscape and hobbyist photographers will have a different take on this but how large is this market? Michael is writing from the perspective of a landscape photographer and his coterie of well-heeled friends, a few of whom may sell the occasional landscape or two or many. Their needs may not mirror the needs of the major market that Hasselblad is targetting.

Despite the anger shown against Hasselblad on this forum, I suspect that when the dust settles, Poulsen will have the last laugh. He is taking a huge gamble but it is an educated one based on his knowledge of the US market. I don't know about the Europeans but Rollei isn't strong there either. And Asia tends to follow the lead of the Americans.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=78511\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]


i think the amount of people talking about this new camera is great viral marketing for the hy6. i guarantee there are as much photographers talking about the hy6 as photographers bitching over the h3d.

they have spent peanuts, and every photographer i talk to is buzing about the hy6. i think the muscle of all these companies working together is different than any photographic product in the past. the main tooling is done, and the proto type is actually working, before it was even anounced (except a couple of electronic features).

hasselblads may be popular to rental places now, but i have come across rental houses that have had enough of the hassles with the h1, and no longer rent them. other rental places live with the hassles as its the only "new system".
i was talking to a rental place today, and they are worried about the closed system hasselblad is pursuing.

as for service, im in new zealand and hasselblad service is no existant, australia is slow, and when i got the firmware updated on my h1 in the usa, it took 5 weeks!
theres a kind of arrogance with them as they are the biggest selling camera, but they are the biggest sellers because the competition hasnt come up with the goods. but thats about to change.

dont get me wrong, i do like many things about the h1/2, but unless they buck up their ideas, they will lose a lot of market share.

paul
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« Reply #31 on: October 01, 2006, 02:44:33 AM »
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Rollei-Sinar has traditionally been very poor in marketing and support. Who is able to rent Rollei equipment even in New York City? After HP Marketing dropped Rollei, what has happened to its service and support? Where is the marketing muscle?

I think you are missing a crucial point. Rollei is not doing this alone. Leaf and Phase One will be releasing this camera through their existing networks. I'll be shocked if rental places which already have the backs DON'T start to supply the Hy6 to go with it. It works better with their existing investment.
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« Reply #32 on: October 01, 2006, 03:45:16 AM »
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I think you are missing a crucial point. Rollei is not doing this alone. Leaf and Phase One will be releasing this camera through their existing networks. I'll be shocked if rental places which already have the backs DON'T start to supply the Hy6 to go with it. It works better with their existing investment.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=78536\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Pros aren't the only ones watching this development. I assume the sellers who have different backs aren't to thrilled about this development. As much as I like this new Hy^ (and hate the name) I wonder how will it compare ergonomically, feature-wise, will it be robust...The Mamiya ZD saga was one tale of the pit-falls of developing new models, Pentax's long-awaited cam is another. Couple that with the late release date and the bugs might not be worked out till fall/winter 07 at the earliest.
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« Reply #33 on: October 01, 2006, 03:46:26 AM »
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I think you are missing a crucial point. Rollei is not doing this alone. Leaf and Phase One will be releasing this camera through their existing networks. I'll be shocked if rental places which already have the backs DON'T start to supply the Hy6 to go with it. It works better with their existing investment.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=78536\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Tell me how well Rollei. Sinar, Leaf and Phase One have been marketing themselves over the last five years and I will gladly concede that I miss the crucial point. These are not exactly companies well known for their marketing savvy. Hasselblad however, is.

Rollei, Leaf, Phase One and Sinar combined cannot match the marketing muscle of Hasselblad USA. At the end of the day, whoever provides the most complete all-in-one solution takes the market.

Why would rental houses who would not take a second look at the Rollei 6008 system all these years, all of a sudden take an interest in the Hy6? Essentially the same camera, different shell. And until the announcement of the Hy6, how many digital backs could you find that would attach itself to the Rollei? Prepare to be shocked because rental houses stock what photographers would want to shoot. And until the Hy6 penetrates the market to some degree (it won't start until April 07), don't expect rental houses to carry any Rollei equipment.  Rental houses are in this to make money, not to cosset some technological whizz kit with poor support. Don't you think that Hasselblad would be working with rental houses to ensure their visibility at this moment? And they have the H3d ready as we speak, not six months down the road, if at all. Can rental houses wait that long? Can photographers wait that long? And by the time the Hy6 is truly ready and everything that it promises to be, will photographers be convinced to switch when what they have, the Hasselblad, has worked as well as it has? Not bloody likely, as Seinfeld sez.

Phase One hasn't said a whit about wanting in with Rollei. So far, it has been speculation. Don't forget that Phase One is in talks with Mamiya. Leaf America is part of Mamiya America Corp. Something's gotta give and I don't think MAC is about t give up Mamiya.

With Leaf and its spotty record of delivering on its promises with the Leaf Aptus series, would you expect it to market the LEAF AFi well at all?

In fact, with the Rollei line splintering up into four distinct groups, market confusion is the end result. Witness how many questions loom on this forum about what the Hy6 really is.  

With so much uncertainty going on, you'd expect photographers to stand in line for the Hy6, would you?

The person who commented that there is interest generated about the Hy6 by viral marketing is correct. But it is one thing to be curious about a product and another thing to having a physical product in your hands and making you part with your hard-earned dollars for and risk your reputation on it. Curiousity has seldom translated into sales.

As it is, we are all speculating based on our biases. You are all besotted with what you think the Hy6 promises without waiting to see if its promises can be delivered.
« Last Edit: October 01, 2006, 05:47:25 AM by izaack » Logged
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« Reply #34 on: October 01, 2006, 04:14:13 AM »
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Tell me how well Rollei. Sinar, Leaf and Phase One have been marketing themselves over the last five years and I will gladly concede that I miss the crucial point. These are not exactly companies well known for their marketing savvy. Hasselblad however, is.

Rollei, Leaf, Phase One and Sinar combined cannot match the marketing muscle of Hasselblad USA. At the end of the day, whoever provides the most complete all-in-one solution takes the market.

Why would rental houses who would not take a second look at the Rollei 6008 system all these years, all of a sudden take an interest in the Hy6? Essentially the same camera, different shell. And until the announcement of the Hy6, how many digital backs could you find that would attach itself to the Rollei? Prepare to be shocked because rental houses stock what photographers would want to shoot. And until the Hy6 penetrates the market to some degree (it won't start until April 07), don't expect rental houses to carry any Rollei equipment.  Rental houses are in this to make money, not to cosset some technological whizz kit with poor support. Don't you think that Hasselblad would be working with rental houses to ensure their visibility at this moment? And they have the H3d ready as we speak, not six months down the road, if at all. Can rental houses wait that long? Can photographers wait that long? And by the time the Hy6 is truly ready and everything that it promises to be, will photographers be convinced to switch when what they have, the Hasselblad, has worked as well as it has? Not bloody likely, as Seinfeld sez.

Phase One hasn't said a whit about wanting in with Rollei. So far, it has been speculation. Don't forget that Phase One is in talks with Mamiya. Leaf America is part of Mamiya America Corp. Something's gotta give and I don't think MAC is about t give up Mamiya.

With Leaf with its spotty record of delivering on its promises with the Leaf Aptus series, would you expect it to market the LEAF AFi well at all?

In fact, with the Rollei line splintering up into four distinct groups, market confusion is the end result. Witness how many questions loom on this forum about what the Hy6 really is. 

With so much uncertainty going on, you'd expect photographers to stand in line for the Hy6, would you?

The person who commented that there is interest generated about the Hy6 by viral marketing is correct. But it is one thing to be curious about a product and another thing to having a physical product in your hands and making you part with your hard-earned dollars for and risk your reputation on it. Curiousity has seldom translated into sales.

As it is, we are all speculating based on our biases. You are all besotted with what you think the Hy6 promises without waiting to see if its promises can be delivered.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=78542\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

i realise that the rollei still needs to live up to its promises, but if it does, it will be a winner.

if hasselbald keeps the door closed on the future of its non-imacon customers, the hy6 wont need very much marketing to sell. rollei will have to come up with the goods of cause, but the market is theirs.

like i said before, the h1 is a pretty good camera. but the customers they lose is because they are shutting them out of any future improvements. they wont buy imacon if they are a leaf or phase user, just because its the only option with a future.

for the phase/leaf/sinar users, the future for the h1 is as rosy as the contax's is.

paul
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« Reply #35 on: October 01, 2006, 04:19:11 AM »
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thanks izaack, for putting some informed balance into this discussions that to me feels very lobsided and showing many opinions propagated by self interest instead of knowing the market as a whole.
BTW my opinion is also propagated by self interest, but I am happy shooting with a H2D39, what can I say?
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« Reply #36 on: October 01, 2006, 05:27:09 AM »
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Does anyone know how Hassy will prevent others from making backs which work with their new H3 cameras?
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By having the intellectual property rights on the connections and mount which is already the case with the H-Mount.
You need to obtain a license to develop and manufacture stuff with an H-mount.

Unless you want to be taken to court by Hasselblad over this you cannot manufacture anything with their mount without their consent.

At least that is the way I expect it is going to be.
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« Reply #37 on: October 01, 2006, 06:17:05 AM »
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By having the intellectual property rights on the connections and mount which is already the case with the H-Mount.
You need to obtain a license to develop and manufacture stuff with an H-mount.

Unless you want to be taken to court by Hasselblad over this you cannot manufacture anything with their mount without their consent.

At least that is the way I expect it is going to be.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=78553\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

I suppose things are even more complicated than this, I was at the Sinar stand yesterday, having a look at the Sinar F3 and the M camera too, and asked if there is a kind of possiblity to fit a Phaseone back sooner or later. They told me if Phase or someone eles would like to produce a back for the m, they could (or did he mean that they wouldn't mind?) Now i suppose there aren't that many M cameras out there, that's why the back manufacturers aren't interested (yet).

tom-
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« Reply #38 on: October 01, 2006, 06:55:51 AM »
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The presentation of the Hy6 has been a marketing disaster.

Rollei is nothing in the actual market. They must to explain what are the strong points of this new "open" platform and what are the compromises assumed with potential clients. What are you offering, why it is a good offer, what problems and demands of clients are you serving better, what are the new possibilities that this system brings and competitors cannot offer, how strong is the involvement of the different companies (and their future plans...).

The Hy6 present more unknowns than responses at this moment. To make things worse, Leica buys Sinar to Jenoptik. Why they did it? What is the role of Leica and Jenoptik in the MF market? Leaf camera was a last minute idea. It was not planned a Leaf clon of the Rollei camera.

This is not a open and public standard, like the 4/3 system is. This is a de facto semi-open platform based on internal (secret) agreements among several companies. We don't know the terms of those agreements. Rollei developed the camera based on the 6000 series, but we don't know if Sinar participated in it. We don't know who paid the bills. We don't know who is the owner of the patents. We don't know if Phase One will be invited or blocked. We know nothing about the "openess" of this "system". We don't know if Schneider and Zeiss are involved in the project or not, and if Leica will offer lenses or not (Sinar was involved in it before Leica purchased them... What is Leica thinking about the Hy6? Is it a mere collateral "accident" of the puchase?)... What is the distribution and support model planned for this camera?

Hasselblad has a stronger position in the MF market, only challenged by Canon (from "outside"). Mamiya is in trouble. Pentax will try. They will offer "closed" MF solutions. Say bye-bye to the other contenders (digital backs manufacturers like Sinar, Leaf, Phase One...).

So... there is an opportunity for a new contender that offers a better solution than Hasselblad (more open, more friendly to photographers) and good (modern, full of features) enough to fight against Canon. Leaf (owned by Kodak), Phase One, Sinar (owned by Leica), Rollei... should establish a new standard, open to all, under clear and public specifications, with a clear commitment from expressely involved companies, and make public all the information in a ordered and clear form. The 4/3 consortium is an acceptable model for one such "open platform". This new "open" and well defined standard is a must, absolutely. If these companies try to go to war separated, I give them a few months of life... Things are changing, competition is stronger and the camera manufacturers are closing their cameras and providing "in house" digital solutions... it is clear to me what will happen...

This is not a question of engineering, but marketing... simple and pure market strategy.

I wish and hope these German companies wake up...
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« Reply #39 on: October 01, 2006, 07:23:58 AM »
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Purely from a self interested point of view, I'm very interested in the Hy6, I think it has potential. I think Hasselblad have shot themselves in the foot with their closed system, not to mention bullshit 'full frame' advertising.

The rental issue is not of interest to me. I have never rented and prefer to buy. Maybe I'm lucky but all the equipment I have bought has been very reliable (he says touching wood), and as a professional, I always have backup so a non issue for me. When I did need repair or support Rollei, in the past,  was no slower or worse the blad even though they had a much, much smaller user base. So also non issue for me.

As a long time V series blad user in film days, then a long time Rollei user, then back to blad (when Rollei, at the time didn't accept P1 backs), I have never ruled out the possibility of moving to H series... until know.

I have looked at them in the past but, for my way of shooting never jumped. I prefer to rotate the back rather than the camera, German glass to Japanese, waist level finders.  Imacon backs never floated my boat and, compared to C1, Flex software and workflow sucks. Although of course that wasn't a problem as you could have chosen another back.... until know. I'm P1 at the moment but wouldn't rule out changing to Leaf  or SInar in the future, as long as the camera platform is supported. The implementation of this with the Hy6 remains to be seen but, hopefully, will give me the choice... very important to me.

The old V series has proven to be a reliable, simple platform and a joy to use, although it would be nice sometimes to have the creature comforts of AF, metering and getting rid of some external wiring. Enter the Hy6. It has those added features, retains the features I enjoy, waist level finder, Zeiss and Schneider glass and retains the square format. I like square and if a rumour, that certain companies are talking with other companies about making a 48mm square sensor turns out to be true, I for one, will be very happy. If it happens (a way off yet I guess), it really would be a poke in the eye to Hasselblad. If Michael's comments about Victor turning in his grave are right (and I think they are), that would get him to a high speed spin.

So, for the moment, I'll stay with V series. Considering an H has now out of the window so that's one potential sale that Hasselblad have lost and, I suspect, not the only one.

All IMHO. Your milage may vary.
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