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Author Topic: Profiling Dye Sub  (Read 2859 times)
Ben Rubinstein
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« on: October 15, 2006, 06:59:35 AM »
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I'm thinking of a self printing solution for a studio that I'm thinking of opening about a year from now with a 'walk out with your prints' type of sale, simple and high volume high street or mall type of work.

Looking at the costs of inkjet printers it does not seem to me that for printing 6X4/7X5/8X12" prints there is a cost effective or time effective solution out there. The answer seems to be the high volume pro dye sub 'event' type printers sold and marketed by Sony/Kodak/Mistsubishi, etc. They are designed for exactly this kind of workflow and with the support and leasing options that a high volume studio would need.

A couple of questions though, how easy is it to profile a dye sub printer? I might still use inkjet for the 8X12" prints due to longevity for hung prints and a far smaller scale of printing which makes cost and time constraints less of an issue. However I would need there to be accurate colour for the dye sub prints in that print quality HAS to defrentiate the pro product from the consumer, and I would need the output from 2 printers, either 2 dye sub or a mix of sye sub and inkjet to be close enough not to invite too critical a comparisons from consumers. I would hope that proper profiling on such printers was provided by the manufacturers but I would not like to have to have my business relying on it!

My next question is longevity. What is the life of a dye sub print? The photos will be presented in folders so for the main they will not be that exposed to sunlight and as I said I would probably be using archival inkjet for the 12X8"'s . However some 7X5" will be put in frames. For a high street service it doesn't bother me to have to provide 200 years of archival printing but I don't want customers on my door 6 months later either!

Any advice and suggestions you may have would be welcome.
« Last Edit: October 15, 2006, 07:03:01 AM by pom » Logged

digitaldog
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« Reply #1 on: October 15, 2006, 09:26:06 AM »
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Very easy to profile. I've never had an issue. They are pretty well behaved more or less (unlike say many ink jet's due to driver non linearity).
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Andrew Rodney
Author “Color Management for Photographers”
http://digitaldog.net/
Ben Rubinstein
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« Reply #2 on: October 15, 2006, 09:47:48 AM »
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many thanks, fancy the job in a year hence?  
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dlashier
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« Reply #3 on: October 15, 2006, 01:07:26 PM »
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I recently bought a Kodak 1400 and even though I have an Eye-1 Photo the prints with the supplied profile are so good that I haven't even bothered profiling yet.

- DL
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Ben Rubinstein
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« Reply #4 on: October 15, 2006, 03:11:52 PM »
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anyone have anything to say about archival properties or lack of?
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Jonathan Ratzlaff
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« Reply #5 on: October 15, 2006, 04:14:59 PM »
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Archival quality about the same as a cheap print. depending on how it is stored and displayed.
Dye-subs have their issues as well.  Dirt on the heating element will leave a white streak down the print, and will be in each print till you clean the element.  Dust is as much as an issue with inkjet..  There is only one fiinish, glossy, matte sucks majorly.  If you thought there was bronzing in an inkjet glossy, wait till you see what black looks like with a matte ribbon..

They are good when you have more or less unskilled labour doing the printing as they are fairly bulletproof and you are working in a mobile setting.  I still think the cost per image is cheaper with an inkject printe like a 4800 0r 3200r especially if you buy paper in bulk.
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