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Author Topic: Eastern Versus Western Landscape Photography  (Read 11791 times)
pobrien3
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« Reply #20 on: November 03, 2006, 09:37:45 PM »
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From the title, I was expecting a philosophical discussion on western (well, probably the US given the demographics here) versus Oriental vision!
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... so was I! Well, NYC does have a thriving Chinatown I suppose  
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fike
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« Reply #21 on: November 04, 2006, 07:03:57 AM »
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... so was I! Well, NYC does have a thriving Chinatown I suppose 
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Sorry about the ethnocentric title.  I can't say that I know anything about how landscape photogrtaphy is perceived or practice in Asia, but it is a pretty interesting question. Based upon what I have seen of asian art,  I would imagine that it would strive for simplicity and simplicity, and simplicity.  I also would think that Asian landscape photography would lean far more heavily towards having an obvious human presence in the photo.  I make that assumption because of Bonsai and Penjing art forms that frequently include miniature figures at pastoral activities like farming or fishing.  

Does anyone have any authoritative experience with landscape photography in Asia.

thanks
fike
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pobrien3
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« Reply #22 on: November 05, 2006, 09:52:48 AM »
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Have a look at some of the work posted in this forum by Bernard Languillier, and the photography of Li Shaobai.

The range of vistas available in Asia are vast, from the stunning mountains in Northern India / Tibet, through deep rainforest to wonderful seascapes and coastlines.  We tend not to have as many deserts as in the Western US.
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amcinroy
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« Reply #23 on: November 11, 2006, 05:28:00 PM »
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Hi,

I live in Ireland. To me this question is less about East vs West but more a question of weather. Ireland has a maritime climate with pressure systems continually passing through. We ofter complain about the "weather" over here but in truth it is the weather that makes Great Britain and Ireland a magical place for landscape photography despite the lack of true wilderness.

The landscape itself is just the canvas, it's the weather that creates the light to paint it.

Andy
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Andy McInroy Photography
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williamrohr
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« Reply #24 on: November 12, 2006, 03:13:52 AM »
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I've lived on both coasts and many places in between.  The biggest differences between eastern and western U.S. photogaphy are the sunsets ... try getting a great landscape shot of the coastline late afternoon or during that magic glow just before final sunset in the East ... impossible as the shadows are all in the wrong direction ... where as in the West ... happens every day.  The other is clouds.  With the weather basically coming west to east, it picks up moisture over the Pacific and then hits our mountainous terain in the wast and forms all those great fluffy cumulus clouds that make great skies ... much less often in the east.  Just a few thoughts.  Bill
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BernardLanguillier
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« Reply #25 on: November 12, 2006, 11:42:43 PM »
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Have a look at some of the work posted in this forum by Bernard Languillier, and the photography of Li Shaobai.

The range of vistas available in Asia are vast, from the stunning mountains in Northern India / Tibet, through deep rainforest to wonderful seascapes and coastlines.  We tend not to have as many deserts as in the Western US.
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Although I am extremely flattered to have been cited, I wouldn't want anyone to think that my images are representative of what can be done in Asia. For several reasons:

- There are obviously many photographers that are a lot more talented, and that have been practising in the region for much longer than me. It just so happens that they mostly don't roam these Western forums,
- Although I have been based in Japan for 9 years, I am obviously not of Asian extraction and my images speak as much of Japan as they speak about me being a Westener living in Japan,
- Most of my work is done in Japan, with only some bits in China, leaving aside huge regions with amazing landscape potential.

I am also definitely no expert on differences between Western and Asian art, including Western and Asian landscape photography. It is a very complex domain. The differences are indeed of course impacted by differences in terrain, but also by cultural backgrounds that will differ from country to country. Just like in the West, such a study of Asian landscape photography could not be carried out independantly from the study of landscape in paintings as an important influence. Perhaps more so in Asia than in the West.

Cheers,
Bernard
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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #26 on: November 13, 2006, 05:11:02 AM »
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All true, Bernard. But you have some lovely photographs!  

Eric
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BernardLanguillier
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« Reply #27 on: November 14, 2006, 12:47:10 AM »
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All true, Bernard. But you have some lovely photographs! 

Eric
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Thank you Eric.  

Cheers,
Bernard
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