Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: 2 more Industrial Landscapes  (Read 2644 times)
Sr.Cordeiro
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 15


WWW
« on: October 25, 2006, 09:51:53 AM »
ReplyReply

Here are 2 more Indutrial Landscapes.

I know the first one is out of focus (I'm getting trouble focusing at low light) but I like it anyway beacuse it captures the mood of the place.

[attachment=1107:attachment]

[attachment=1109:attachment]

Thanks,


Ricardo
Logged
russell a
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 389


WWW
« Reply #1 on: October 25, 2006, 10:22:21 AM »
ReplyReply

Ricardo:  You might want to set the focus manually in these situations.  Mood is mood, but the eye generally needs something to settle on to anchor one into the shot.  The second picture has great potential.  I find the near-field out-of-focus wire fencing against the main overhead (road or rail?) structure a terrific graphic element.  The foreground bramble is distracting and doesn't reinforce and support that element.  You might try burning the bramble down and/or dropping the green significantly in the Channel Mixer.  Or, as I often do, go back to the site and shoot many alternative views.  It's worth working on.
Logged
jule
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 738


WWW
« Reply #2 on: October 25, 2006, 04:33:25 PM »
ReplyReply

Ricardo. Although the out of focus aspect does create a mood - it is not out of focus enough for it not to be acknowleged as poor technique and a bit uncomfortable to look at. Even really out of fous images are really difficult to get to work. (threads in the past few months   ) In saying that- if you like it anyway, I think that's the most important thing.

I also agreee with russell a, that the green of the brambles seems to destroy the graphic element of the wire. I would not however agree to burn it down - unless you own the property- we call that arson over here.  I would have liked to have a play with the Channel mixer, but your image is so small that I was not able to.

I would go to the site in the day time, and explore the composition of your images in daylight. Take a notebook or sketch book, and get a feel for the composition and structure of the images which inspire you. Then let the night-time exposure and light assist the mood - and create unseen suprises with the different light and shadows.

Julie
Logged

Paul Sumi
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1217


« Reply #3 on: October 25, 2006, 08:08:46 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote
I would not however agree to burn it down - unless you own the property- we call that arson over here.  I[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=82272\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

I believe the "burning" (i.e., darkening) is to be done in PhotoShop so no foliage will be harmed improving this image  

I like the ambiguity of the second image, but agree the bramble is distracting.

Paul
Logged

russell a
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 389


WWW
« Reply #4 on: October 26, 2006, 07:41:30 AM »
ReplyReply

Julie and Paul:  Thanks for highlighting my possibly ambiguous use of "burning" in this context.  On the other hand, this could signal a trend towards "Gonzo Photography".  [re Robert Duvall's character in Apocalypse Now "I love the smell of napalm in the morning.  Smells like ...........composition."
Logged
Pages: [1]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad