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Author Topic: What about...?  (Read 6787 times)
wolfnowl
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« on: October 25, 2006, 07:39:15 PM »
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Even as photographers, whether professional, amateur or somewhere in between, none of us have a camera to hand 24/7.  Even when I'm walking down the street I find myself looking at colours, compositions, shapes, shadows...

So, what do you remember as the best shot(s) you never got to take?  The times you WISHED you had a camera?

I'll offer a few:

1) I was walking through town one evening around sunset, just after a heavy rainstorm when I passed by a wooden bench that had recently been recoated.  The dark brown of the bench was highlighted by the last of the yellow rays, and there were huge droplets of water spattered over the surfaces of the bench, and a bold green sign that proclaimed, 'Wet Paint'.

2) I was at home in my office on a rainy afternoon, trying to focus on paper work when I looked out the window and saw two people with umbrellas walking along the sidewalk across the street.  In front was an old grandmother, European, dressed all in black and hunched over with her umbrella practically hiding her; it was clutched so tightly.  Behind her walked (I presume) her granddaughter, in a bright pink raincoat, and with her umbrella held horizontally at arms length in front of her while she caught as many raindrops as she could on her face and tongue.

3) About 10 years ago I was driving out to Canada's east coast and stopped overnight in Campbellton, New Brunswick.  I got up early the next morning (Sunday) and drove along the secondary highway that parallels the ocean.  Just after sunrise I passed over a bridge that was sheltering a few small fishing boats, so I stopped and wound off the last of my film.  Got back in the car and about a hundred yards down the road there was a lagoon with THIRTY SEVEN Great Blue Herons in it, all waiting for me to arrive, without film...

Anyone else?

Mike.
« Last Edit: October 25, 2006, 07:41:10 PM by wolfnowl » Logged

If your mind is attuned to beauty, you find beauty in everything.
~ Jean Cooke ~


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aksundevil
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« Reply #1 on: October 25, 2006, 11:54:16 PM »
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Wow, those are some fun stories, and it made me smile (sympathetically of course) to read the last one. When I don't have a camera with me, I don't see the world in quite as much of a photographic way as you seem to, so I can't recount any similar situations. My stories are more likely to be of pictures I tried to take that would have been amazing had something not gone horribly wrong, or...

I had repelled into a moulin (large often circular shaft created by running water) on the top of a glacier, and discovered another level area where the tiny stream was running over the ice around corners in a sparkling blue tunnel. There were very few places to avoid getting soaked, and walls/floor/ceiling of ice left very few functional places to set up the tripod for a long exposure. Having finally settled on a composition and recorded an image with bracketed exposures, I was excited to view my results. But the image was not meant to be. Even though each of the exposures appeared quite dark, even the darkest one was clipped in the blue channel across the entire image. I remember that as possibly the most spectacular place I've ever been privileged to explore, but my equipment and I just couldn't reproduce the moment.
« Last Edit: October 25, 2006, 11:56:07 PM by aksundevil » Logged
BernardLanguillier
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« Reply #2 on: November 06, 2006, 02:29:13 AM »
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A very frustrating moment hit me last week in Western China.

I was in a shuttle bus driving through a valley surrounded by peaks in the 5000 m range, had my camera ready on the tripod, the right lens on and 100 frames left on my Extreme CF.

All of a sudden we come out of a curve and I see up above in front of me one of the most amazing sunset light I have ever seen. A Granit face, with some bits of snow on, softly hidden in early evening mist with the setting sun hitting it at a low incidence angle giving an amazing sense of depth to the scene.

The driver refused to stop there claiming that yaks could be dangerous.

The sun had set for 40 seconds when the bus stopped at the next location...

Cheers,
Bernard
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to-mas
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« Reply #3 on: November 06, 2006, 11:00:23 AM »
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thanks god I have so bad memory that I forgot all of them. Cool
But thats why I try to take camera with me most of the time. When I was younger I have it with me all the time.
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