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Author Topic: Wildlife in New York Exhibition  (Read 2735 times)
AgoraGallery
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« on: October 30, 2006, 05:10:58 AM »
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Dear member,

I would like to invite you to our upcoming exhibition "The Persistence of Form" showcasing wildlife and landscape paintings by artists Geraldine Simmons and Tohru Aizawa. Also, I would like to invite you to our upcoming exhibition "The compendium of form" showcasing wildlife paintings by artist Veronika Doljenkova.

The Persistence of Form runs December 7 - December 27 in Agora Gallery's Chelsea location at 530 West 25th Street. The reception takes place Thursday, December 7, 6-8 PM. The exhibition is free and open to the public.

The compendium of form runs December 7 - December 27 in Agora Gallery's Chelsea location at 530 West 25th Street. The reception takes place Thursday, December 7, 6-8 PM. The exhibition is free and open to the public.


I would appreciate it if the exhibition announcement can be posted on your

Amanda Aaron
Public Relations Department
Agora Gallery

530 West 25th Street, in Chelsea, New York
www.Agora-Gallery.com

Geraldine Simmons: The Persistence of Form

Beautiful, stark, portraits of majestic, regal animals in the wild characterize Geraldine Simmons' powerful works. Her deft hand imbues a dignity and humanity that is touching and yet unsettling—these animals appear to possess emotion. Caught in their natural habitat of glorious splendor, the animals in these colored pencil works, detailed with gouache, watercolor and oil pastels, are lush and powerful, of vibrant color. An Australian artist living and working on Sydney’s northern beaches, Geraldine’s majestic surroundings with abundant wildlife resonate a deep respect and passion for the natural world, providing inspiration for her work. “When I use colored pencils to draw a pair of 400-pound lions snoozing in the late afternoon sun, I can almost hear the gentle breeze rustling the grass. Their beauty, innocence and power inspire me to draw. I am drawn to an animal’s instinctive knowing and inherent trust that assists me on an unfolding path of self-discovery.” Geraldine’s drawings are an attempt to become a portal for respect and honor for these animals, a call to preserve the delicate balance between human, animal and habitat.
To view Simmons' work, please visit http://www.agora-gallery.com/ArtistInvite/...ne_Simmons.aspx


Geraldine Simmons, Jodie, Pencil on Watercolor Paper

Veronika Doljenkova: The Compendium of Form

Veronika Doljenkova’s magical interpretation of nature brings a lighter side to structural art. Hiking excursions have been her main source of inspiration. These works are her way of locking onto a memory from these hikes. Her work creates a blurred look into nature and its mystical side or its “spirit.” The artwork can convey a minute aspect of nature or the essence nature is giving off. Watercolor, as her preferred medium, adds to her lighter style. It isn’t a thick or bold statement, merely a suggestion of nature’s appearance. Bluish tones of the watercolor give a heavenly sense, almost as if these unrecognizable figures are lost amongst the clouds. These qualities bring together an enchanting atmosphere for a story. Doljenkova’s background includes scientific and children’s book illustration, which has allowed her to approach her work from two different angles: a “pure structural observation” and a magical world of a fairytale.
To view Doljenkova’s work, please visit http://www.agora-gallery.com/ArtistInvite/...Doljenkova.aspx


Veronika Doljenkova, Butterfly fantasy, Watercolor on Paper

Tohru Aizawa: The Persistence of Form

Japanese artist Tohru Aizawa captures fleeting, wild moments in the Alaskan landscape. Aizawa states that he strives to sustain a certain level of photographic realism in his work, yet the viewer can easily see that Aizawa brings his own emotional dimension and depth to the painting through his interpretation. Using subtle color variation to convey mood, each Alaskan landscape is spare, minimal and elegant. These landscapes are stark and seemingly barren, yet Aizawa manages to suggest dormant life stirring just under the surface. Aizawa’s triumph in these works is his ability to simultaneously suggest a landscape that is wholly alien to the viewer, yet also deeply familiar. Tohru Aizawa has been painting since he was eighteen years old. He has exhibited widely throughout his native country of Japan, in both group and solo shows.
To view Aizawa’s work, please visit http://www.agora-gallery.com/ArtistInvite/Tohru_Aizawa.aspx


Tohru Aizawa, Memories of Alaska 9, Oil on Canvas
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