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Author Topic: Large Print - flat or rolled ?  (Read 4484 times)
EWS_FoTo
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« on: November 12, 2006, 04:25:31 PM »
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Hi everyone,

I am wondering how i should do to delevery large prints 14 " x 21" , 16" x 20" that i sold, Flat or rolled-in a tube Huh

A tube seem more practical but i am afraid to dammage the printing.  Anyone have tried to roll it ?

EWS
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Brian Gilkes
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« Reply #1 on: November 12, 2006, 04:39:49 PM »
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It depends a bit on what paper you are using.
In general most of the heavier papers in rolls are around a 3" core. The paper should not be rolled to a smaller diameter. In Oz the post offices supply 3" diam tubes. Obviously this is not big enough.
One can use a 4" diam tube . To ensure no kinking roll paper first around a lightweight 3" core together with a sheet of archival tissue or similar (eg appropriate plastic) to reduce possible scuffing and further protect.. Spraying print with Premier Art Print Shield is a good idea too.
Then wrap with bubble wrap and slide carefully into the tube. Allow print to dry and harden for a day or so before posting.
Maybe others would like to share their solutions
HTH
Brian
www.pharoseditions.com.au
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Geoff Wittig
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« Reply #2 on: November 12, 2006, 08:30:16 PM »
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I've done it both ways. Prints that have been matted & mounted obviously have to go flat; these seem to survive the journey pretty well if they're shipped inside a polyester bag, which is then sandwiched between two sheets of cardboard, then placed inside a paper mailing bag.
I have shipped prints up to 24x56" gently rolled, then wrapped inside a sheet of tissue (the 24x30" sheets that Somerset velvet comes packed with are perfect), and slipped inside a hard cardboard 4" tube.
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Mark Graf
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« Reply #3 on: November 14, 2006, 11:09:37 AM »
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Both methods can probably have success in delivering an undamaged print to your customer, but I personally think one shipped flat has a better presentation and is easier for a customer to handle until ready for framing/matting.
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Dale Allyn
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« Reply #4 on: November 14, 2006, 11:31:07 AM »
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U-line sells cardboard mailers in many large sizes that may help with your packaging of the prints flat.

Here's a link:
http://www.uline.com/Browse_Listing_1303.a...%2DOver+Mailers
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Gary Ferguson
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« Reply #5 on: November 14, 2006, 12:36:09 PM »
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If it's a print that you value then flat is the only way. Rolling it can scuff or abrade the surface and causes micro-creases which damage the surface. If it's large commercial prints, say for use in a temporary trade exhibition, then roll away!
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EWS_FoTo
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« Reply #6 on: November 16, 2006, 08:53:21 PM »
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Quote
It depends a bit on what paper you are using.
In general most of the heavier papers in rolls are around a 3" core. The paper should not be rolled to a smaller diameter. In Oz the post offices supply 3" diam tubes. Obviously this is not big enough.
One can use a 4" diam tube . To ensure no kinking roll paper first around a lightweight 3" core together with a sheet of archival tissue or similar (eg appropriate plastic) to reduce possible scuffing and further protect.. Spraying print with Premier Art Print Shield is a good idea too.
Then wrap with bubble wrap and slide carefully into the tube. Allow print to dry and harden for a day or so before posting.
Maybe others would like to share their solutions
HTH
Brian
www.pharoseditions.com.au
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=84838\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

I use rolled Epson Enhanced matte paper.  THX  Brian, Geoff, Mark, DFALLYN, and Gary for all of your share experiences about this issue.  I will probably go safe with the flat option after considering i only found 3 " tubes yet.  

Eric
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Richowens
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« Reply #7 on: November 16, 2006, 09:02:59 PM »
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Try here
Mailing Tubes

I see that they have up to 12"

Rich
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EWS_FoTo
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« Reply #8 on: November 16, 2006, 09:15:28 PM »
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Try here
Mailing Tubes

I see that they have up to 12"

Rich
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=85746\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

OK, do you know if they deliver to CAnada ?

I will have a tour on you web site soon.  

Eric
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Tim Ernst
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« Reply #9 on: November 17, 2006, 06:32:30 AM »
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"If it's a print that you value then flat is the only way."

Well, not exactly. Kind of tough to ship a 40 x 60 inch print flat. Rolling is fine if you do it correctly to protect the print surface. I cover each print with tissue paper, then slide into a large flat plastic bag. I roll the print around a tube (protects from being crushed or kinked), then cover with bubble wrap and then either place into a long box or into another, larger tube. This is for prints 24" x 36" and larger (with smaller ones they only go into a single tube, but still with the tissue paper and plastic bag for protection of the print surface). The presentation is better with a flat-shipped print for sure, but sometimes the reality of the situation (size of the print) dictates a tube. The rolls do tend to roll off onto the floor and get manhandled quite a bit since they won't hold still during the shipping process, which is one reason I often use a long box for the outside container since they won't roll. I've had both very sturdy tubes and flat packages destroyed by the shipping services (generally it is easier for them to bend a flat then a thick tube, so if you ship flat be sure to put some really stiff boards in there). And for some reason the post office likes to bend everything in half these days (I ship the larger prints UPS - so I can collect $100 if they smash/bend one - smaller ones via post office).

One thing to keep in mind when comparing prices at the Yazoo site that was noted above is that their prices include shipping (looks like they will ship to Canada, although for a different price). The shipping costs can often be as much or even more than the cost of the tubes so you need to factor this in when looking at other vendors.

Make sure prints that you sell include the costs for the packaging and shipping, which can add up to quite a bit for larger prints if you do it correctly, and why do it any other way...

Tim Ernst in Arkansas
www.Cloudland.net
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Nill Toulme
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« Reply #10 on: November 17, 2006, 07:58:22 AM »
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I've been using Uline's 3" triangular tubes with success.  They seem a little sturdier than round tubes, and they don't try to roll away, and as they come flat you can store a lot of them in very little space.  They're also easier for the customer to get the piece out of without damage, as they just unfold to unpack.

Nill
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