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Author Topic: How to carry a camera while hiking  (Read 10959 times)
scubarob639
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« on: November 27, 2006, 08:25:11 PM »
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I'll be walking about 60 miles through the Northen Serengetti, I'd like to carry my 1Dmk11 with a 300mm 2.8 attached and ready.  I currently just have the camera strap around my neck. Is there a more comfortable way to carry this and should I be using the strap which attaches to the lens instead of the camera strap?  I also wear a Lowepro Dryzone 200 backpack for additional equipment.  

Suggestions please

Rob
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dobson
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« Reply #1 on: November 28, 2006, 12:59:01 AM »
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When hiking, I put my camera and long lens, (in case of suprise wildlife), over my shoulder, bandolier style. A small bag with a wide lens sits in reach on the side of my pack. As the  the trail gets rough and I have to scramble, I clip the camera strap to my pack's waistbelt using a climbing-gear racking device called an ice-clipper, (the strap goes around my neck, shoulder and the ice-clipper). This effectively immobilizes the camera, but you have to unclip it to use it. My pack has slots for the ice clipper, but you could rig something together with cordage and a carabiner.

Third party neckstraps are much more comfortable than the Canon ones. Mine is a neoprene material that is confortable even after 20 mile days.

Your setup is much heavier than my backcounty kit, so you may have to experiment with what fits you equipment/style. Take a few long day-hikes experimenting with different systems. The main thing is to reduce swinging and chafing.

Phillip
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Nick Rains
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« Reply #2 on: November 28, 2006, 01:56:27 AM »
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I'll be walking about 60 miles through the Northen Serengetti, I'd like to carry my 1Dmk11 with a 300mm 2.8 attached and ready.  I currently just have the camera strap around my neck. Is there a more comfortable way to carry this and should I be using the strap which attaches to the lens instead of the camera strap?  I also wear a Lowepro Dryzone 200 backpack for additional equipment. 

Suggestions please

Rob
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That's a long hike with a 300/2.8!

I'd never, ever carry that by the camera strap - too much strain on the lens mount. Use the lens strap and sling it over one shoulder  so it sits under your arm - I find this quite comfortable.
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Nick Rains
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thompsonkirk
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« Reply #3 on: November 28, 2006, 11:16:25 AM »
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I just did the Wainwright coast-to-coast hike in Britain carrying a 5D, & I found that the best way to carry it - in good weather - was to drop the lens through the sternum strap of my backpack, with the camera base against my chest & the sternum strap supporting the body.  The neck strap hung loosely around my neck as a safety backup.  This puts the weight of the camera on your shoulders.  And I was able to use treking poles without bumping the camera on one side of my body.  I thought the sternum strap might make wear-marks on the camera body, but that didn't happen.  

The other thing I learned was that it would make sense, at least for me, to buy a smaller hiking camera with 1.6 sensor.

Kirk
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larsrc
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« Reply #4 on: November 28, 2006, 02:14:25 PM »
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When hiking, I put my camera and long lens, (in case of suprise wildlife), over my shoulder, bandolier style. A small bag with a wide lens sits in reach on the side of my pack. As the  the trail gets rough and I have to scramble, I clip the camera strap to my pack's waistbelt using a climbing-gear racking device called an ice-clipper, (the strap goes around my neck, shoulder and the ice-clipper). This effectively immobilizes the camera, but you have to unclip it to use it. My pack has slots for the ice clipper, but you could rig something together with cordage and a carabiner.

Third party neckstraps are much more comfortable than the Canon ones. Mine is a neoprene material that is confortable even after 20 mile days.

Your setup is much heavier than my backcounty kit, so you may have to experiment with what fits you equipment/style. Take a few long day-hikes experimenting with different systems. The main thing is to reduce swinging and chafing.

Phillip
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I agree with the bandoliering, and might add that it also makes it easy to hold on to the camera in situations where you don't want it bouncing around.  Interesting idea with the ice-clipper -- I previously tried with a Velcro belt to stop sideways movement, but that sounds more reasonable.

-Lars
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Ed Dubois
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« Reply #5 on: November 28, 2006, 02:43:57 PM »
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Have a look at the Think Tank Photo 'Rotation 360' pack. http://www.rotation360.com/

It offers a strap system that loads the weight of your camera body and lens onto the backpack shoulder straps. I'd think this would be much more comfortable for the weight of your intended gear and not have the disadvantage of wearing it bandolier-style which puts an uneven load on your neck and shoulders.
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KMOlender
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« Reply #6 on: November 28, 2006, 05:56:32 PM »
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Also take a look at the Kinesis H717 "X strap".
Kinesis camera harnesses
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Kurt O.
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« Reply #7 on: December 17, 2006, 06:27:20 PM »
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Look at the OP/TECH Binocular/Camera Harness. You can attach it to the camera itself or like I do, attach it to a holster pack for the camera. It sits comfortably on your chest but no uncomfortable strap around your neck. I like the balance it gives your gear for the long walks. I don't use a long lens like you do so I don't know how a long holster pack would work. I have had some 15 mile days with mine and a full 30 lb backpack and it was comfortable.
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Glen
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« Reply #8 on: December 18, 2006, 07:23:40 AM »
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Have a look at the Think Tank Photo 'Rotation 360' pack. http://www.rotation360.com/

It offers a strap system that loads the weight of your camera body and lens onto the backpack shoulder straps. I'd think this would be much more comfortable for the weight of your intended gear and not have the disadvantage of wearing it bandolier-style which puts an uneven load on your neck and shoulders.
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I just purchased the Rotation 360 and will be returning it today.  I'm about 6' 4.5" and it's WAY too small for my frame!  Took it to a camera shop to show a friend who works there - several folks tried it on - everyone felt that if you are over 5' 10" it's not comfortable.

I day hike with an Osprey Atmos 35 loaded down Canon 1Ds Mk II with lenses, Gitzo CF 1227, RRS Pano full setup, etc.  To offset the weight of the backpack I have attached two carabiners on the from of my packs shoulder straps, then have two lenghts of climbing cord (about 5" long) that goes down to two more biners.  I attached two metal rings to the shoulder strap hooks on the camera.  Thus when hiking I can have the camera hanging on my chest, held in place with the sternum strap.  Want to use it, just release the sternum strap and lift it up into position.  To remove the back pack just release one of the biners where it attaches to the camera.

Did a 5 mile hike in the TN mountians yesterday and the weight of the 1DS Mk II being upfront really helps distribute the weight on my body.

Jack
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Ray
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« Reply #9 on: December 18, 2006, 08:40:19 AM »
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There's a very simple method of carrying two cameras around your neck whilst hiking. You adjust the cameras strap on one camera to its shortest position, and the camera strap on the other camera to its longest position.

You then sling the cameras around your neck in the usual fashion.

By this method, the two cameras are on a different level and do not bang or clash together when walking.

What's the problem?  
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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #10 on: December 18, 2006, 10:23:08 AM »
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There's a very simple method of carrying two cameras around your neck whilst hiking. You adjust the cameras strap on one camera to its shortest position, and the camera strap on the other camera to its longest position.

You then sling the cameras around your neck in the usual fashion.

By this method, the two cameras are on a different level and do not bang or clash together when walking.

What's the problem? 
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=91169\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
OK for short distances, but for any serious hiking it is very desirable to get the weight off your neck. Some of the suggestions above involve hanging the camera(s) from the shoulder straps of a pack or X-harness. This makes a huge difference IMHO. For long hikes with lots of weight, I have generally hung two cameras from attachment points on the frame of an external-frame backpack. The weight is all on my hips and I can hike many miles with a heavy pack and many thousands of feet elevation change. One camera on a strap around my neck is more tiring all by itself on a one-mile city walk.
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-Eric Myrvaagnes

http://myrvaagnes.com  Visit my website. New images each season.
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