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Author Topic: Just finished installing my 3800!  (Read 25972 times)
Jack Flesher
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« on: November 30, 2006, 06:58:43 PM »
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FWIW, my dealer got a shipment of 3800's in today so I scarfed mine up.  Easy to set up, installed flawlessly.  Not too much to tell yet, as I just printed out a bunch of my profiling test targets on all my favorite media so I can build profiles tomorrow -- oh boy

First impressions are very positive:

1) Printer is smaller than I expected -- think just a bit larger than the 2400. 2) It is quiet and does not wiggle the so-so stand I have it on. 3) Initial print quality looks superb. 4) Swapping between Pk and Mk ink takes maybe 10-15 seconds. 5) Spiffy cartridge design and easy to change. 6) You press a button on the control panel (electronic) to open the ink well cover!  7) Oh yeah, USB2 port AND built-in 10/100 LAN!  Cool Auto install was painless and installed a full set of paper profiles along with the drivers (at least on my Win machine).

More to follow once I get the profiles built and spew out a few real prints!
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John Hollenberg
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« Reply #1 on: November 30, 2006, 07:05:36 PM »
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Jack,

Epson specs show 1:55 / 2:55 to switch PK -> MK / MK - > PK.  Are you sure about the 10-15 seconds???

Otherwise sounds very exciting.

--John
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Jack Flesher
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« Reply #2 on: November 30, 2006, 07:33:44 PM »
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Jack,

Epson specs show 1:55 / 2:55 to switch PK -> MK / MK - > PK.  Are you sure about the 10-15 seconds???

Otherwise sounds very exciting.

--John
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=87967\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

No, I'm not sure at all as I didn't time it -- I'm sure Epson's specs are accurate.    The change is automatic based on media selected (or it can be done manually) and did not seem to take very long, but I'll time it next time
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madmanchan
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« Reply #3 on: November 30, 2006, 09:50:27 PM »
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Hi Jack, I'm looking to upgrade from my aging 2200 to the 3800 and so I look forward to hearing what you have to say about it. If you end up creating a set of 3800 notes similar to what you did for your old 4800, I'm sure that would be greatly appreciated.

Eric
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picnic
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« Reply #4 on: November 30, 2006, 10:27:11 PM »
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FWIW, my dealer got a shipment of 3800's in today so I scarfed mine up.  Easy to set up, installed flawlessly.  Not too much to tell yet, as I just printed out a bunch of my profiling test targets on all my favorite media so I can build profiles tomorrow -- oh boy

First impressions are very positive:

1) Printer is smaller than I expected -- think just a bit larger than the 2400. 2) It is quiet and does not wiggle the so-so stand I have it on. 3) Initial print quality looks superb. 4) Swapping between Pk and Mk ink takes maybe 10-15 seconds. 5) Spiffy cartridge design and easy to change. 6) You press a button on the control panel (electronic) to open the ink well cover!  7) Oh yeah, USB2 port AND built-in 10/100 LAN!  Cool Auto install was painless and installed a full set of paper profiles along with the drivers (at least on my Win machine).

More to follow once I get the profiles built and spew out a few real prints!
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=87965\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

I'm so glad to hear real life impressions of the 3800.  I have a deposit on one--but it may still be several weeks until I get it.  I measured against my 2200---and the biggest difference was that it is 10 inches high--several more than the 2200--and about 4.5 inches deeper which surprised me, but luckily I have the room.

I got my Epson 3800 samples today too--so that REALLY whetted my appetite LOL.  

Looking forward to hearing more.

Diane
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Paul Sumi
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« Reply #5 on: December 01, 2006, 01:16:09 AM »
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Jack,

Would you happen to know if the 3800 id "linearized" like its bigger siblings?  I have the 2400, but this new printer is very interesting.

Thanks,

Paul
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Rhossydd
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« Reply #6 on: December 01, 2006, 02:53:14 AM »
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4) Swapping between Pk and Mk ink takes maybe 10-15 seconds. 5) Spiffy cartridge design and easy to change.

I think time's flying for you with your new printer ;-)

The change over from Photo-matt black took 1min 42secs here on mine the first time I did it. It also recorded 2% of the matt black ink used in the change.

I'm just in the process of writing up a report on the printer, but there are a few issues that need working out before I want to put too much in print. Getting the right paper settings for non-OEM paper may prove more complex than previous desktop printers, so profiling is taking longer than expected.

Also worth noting that there is a newer driver already on the Epson UK support site than that supplied with the printer, also there are a few errors and incongruities in the PDF manual to add to the lack of information.

Paul Holman
www.colourprofiles.com
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NikosR
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« Reply #7 on: December 01, 2006, 05:04:53 AM »
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There's also a firmware update listed (o02269).

In typical Epson fashion no info is provided about what the new driver or firmware add or fix.

Also I see that the discrepancy continues with this printer with regards to the driver versions for the US and the European markets. UK site lists version 5.5b and US site lists 5.51 (for Win XP).   Also no mention of firmware update on US site.
« Last Edit: December 01, 2006, 05:15:32 AM by NikosR » Logged

Nikos
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« Reply #8 on: December 01, 2006, 07:30:34 AM »
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 Jippy I get mine by monday. Just had a call from my supplier in the Netherlands!!!
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CliffSamys
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« Reply #9 on: December 01, 2006, 11:11:27 AM »
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Hi all,

I have 3 3800s in stock right now. We went through a pallette-full yesterday in preorders.
These will go quick, so if you want one, email me quick!

Cliff
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Cliff
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John Camp
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« Reply #10 on: December 01, 2006, 11:31:00 AM »
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I think time's flying for you with your new printer ;-)

The change over from Photo-matt black took 1min 42secs here on mine the first time I did it. It also recorded 2% of the matt black ink used in the change.

Paul Holman
www.colourprofiles.com
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=88006\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Be very interested in your report. On Michael's recorded interview, the Epson guy said (I think -- this is just from memory) -- that the changeover used only one mL (I think he called it "negligible" or some such.) 2% isn't much unless you change a lot, but would it be possible to look and see if subsequent changes continue to be 2%? Whatever, it's a lot better than changing out on older machines...

JC
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John Hollenberg
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« Reply #11 on: December 01, 2006, 12:32:55 PM »
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Be very interested in your report. On Michael's recorded interview, the Epson guy said (I think -- this is just from memory) -- that the changeover used only one mL (I think he called it "negligible" or some such.) 2% isn't much unless you change a lot, but would it be possible to look and see if subsequent changes continue to be 2%? Whatever, it's a lot better than changing out on older machines...

Takes 1.5 ml PK -> MK, 4.5 ml MK -> PK per Epson specs.  The roundtrip is about $4.15  estimated ink cost.  See for comparison of 3800, 4800 and Canon IPF5000:

http://www.canonipf5000.wikispaces.com/FAQ#Pros

--John
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DiaAzul
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« Reply #12 on: December 01, 2006, 01:26:59 PM »
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7) Oh yeah, USB2 port AND built-in 10/100 LAN!  Cool Auto install was painless and installed a full set of paper profiles along with the drivers (at least on my Win machine).

[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=87965\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Hey, we have something in common here :-) Just got mine today.

I have mine set up on Ethernet port (over a wireless bridge as I don't have space near the PC, and I can possibly spool large files to a print server).

It took a little more time and head scratching to set up as the Ethernet port would not work until it was enabled via the menus on the LCD panels. Is this something that anyone else has had problems with or did the Ethernet port work straight out of the box? Would have been nice to have had clearer instructions on how to set up the machine.

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There's also a firmware update listed (o02269).

Mine shipped with 002468, which I am assuming is later firmware version that that listed on the UK website (mine was purcahsed in UK). As to updating the firmware start the Front Panel application and everything looks straightforward - though no clue so far as to difference between network and device driver firmware.
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David Plummer    http://photo.tanzo.org/
Jack Flesher
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« Reply #13 on: December 01, 2006, 04:06:10 PM »
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Okay, profiles built, test images printed and even printed up a real image.

First print impressions are very positive.  Image quality is essentially equal to my epson 7800 and using custom paper profiles the continuous tone grayscale slice looks perfectly neutral.  Image is very sharp yet remains smoothness.  In short, it appears to produce identical prints to my 7800.

~~~

Eric asked about a running diary:  I really don't have the time to devote to that this time around, so will rely on this forum to post updates and share ideas.

Paul asked if this printer is "linearized" like the 4/7/9-800:  I really don't know -- maybe Michael does?

Ethernet: I did not connect mine that way, but there was a separate set of instructions to DL off the software CD that appeas to explain it pretty well -- they did mention the need to select that port in both the driver and on the printer's LCD menu.

Firmware and Driver updates: Mine shipped with FW 02468 and Win Driver 5.51 and I do not see any updates on the US site for either.  


~~~

The only fly in the ointment so far is a minor nit.  Standard papers like Premium Luster can be multi-sheet fed through the main feed port.  When you print on thick Fine Art paper, you need to single-feed through the rear tray.  You also need to manually build and select a custom paper type for the thicker paper. You can build 10 presets via the LCD panel or using the "Remote Panel" where you set paper type and thickness, platten gap and custom align the head-gap to that specific paper -- a spiffy set of options for maximum print quality, especially considering the variables in different fine art papers.  

However, when switching from type of paper to the other, the feed tray option will automatically change (you get notified in the print dialog) and the Mk/Pk ink will switch over automatically, but the custom paper parameters do not switch.  You need to set them manually, even to get back to the default "standard" setting.  

A minor annoyance is all, but one that needs to be considered lest you waste a few sheets of paper if you forget.  Nonetheless, an annoyance I'll live with for the abilty to easily switch between paper types and Mk and Pk inks!

~~~
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picnic
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« Reply #14 on: December 01, 2006, 05:11:23 PM »
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Okay, profiles built, test images printed and even printed up a real image.

First print impressions are very positive.  Image quality is essentially equal to my epson 7800 and using custom paper profiles the continuous tone grayscale slice looks perfectly neutral.  Image is very sharp yet remains smoothness.  In short, it appears to produce identical prints to my 7800.
~~~
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=88137\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Jack, then for all the talk about the new printing algorithms, you aren't seeing anything different I take it.  That's okay--what I've seen from the 7800 is wonderful.  I got 3800 samples yesterday--a b/w (greg gorman) and color (forgot who) and I was pleased.

May I ask why you added the 3800--is it to give you a bit of flexibility--not having to crank up that much larger printer??

Diane
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Jack Flesher
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« Reply #15 on: December 01, 2006, 05:49:52 PM »
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Jack, then for all the talk about the new printing algorithms, you aren't seeing anything different I take it.  That's okay--what I've seen from the 7800 is wonderful.  I got 3800 samples yesterday--a b/w (greg gorman) and color (forgot who) and I was pleased.

May I ask why you added the 3800--is it to give you a bit of flexibility--not having to crank up that much larger printer??

Diane
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=88142\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

To your first question -- I think we are seeing something different in that a pro-sumer priced printer is delivering prints as good as a full-blown pro level printer.  (I'll also add, but carefully, that there is the impression that the 3800 prints are a bit sharper than the 7800 prints. I have not empirically confirmed this and the difference if really there is very slight, so I do not want to be quoted as saying it's so.  I mention it primarily as a point of curiosity if others see it too.)

To your second question -- I added the 3800 so I would have a lower-cost option for printing with Mk ink on art papers than doing an ink swap in the 7800 or buying a second 7800 dedicated to Mk ink.  Since I only print on thicker sheet-stock for art papers, I did not need another roll-fed printer.  I also liked the option of being able to print a handfull 4x6's or 5x7's on single sheets when desired.  Add that it fit on the printer stand next to my computer -- and for as rarely as I need one, it can serve as my everyday desktop plain paper printer.  In these last two uses, the 3800 replaces an R800.

Cheers,
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jjlphoto
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« Reply #16 on: December 01, 2006, 06:15:35 PM »
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Mine is en-route! I have never done ethernet printing before. I am on OSX, and all three of my computers are networked together through one of those ordinary Linksys 4 port switch/routers you get anywhere. Any info on how one does ethernet printing? I am presently set up as a USB print shop.
« Last Edit: December 01, 2006, 06:16:35 PM by jjlphoto » Logged

Thanks, John Luke

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picnic
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« Reply #17 on: December 01, 2006, 06:42:55 PM »
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To your first question -- I think we are seeing something different in that a pro-sumer priced printer is delivering prints as good as a full-blown pro level printer.  (I'll also add, but carefully, that there is the impression that the 3800 prints are a bit sharper than the 7800 prints. I have not empirically confirmed this and the difference if really there is very slight, so I do not want to be quoted as saying it's so.  I mention it primarily as a point of curiosity if others see it too.)

To your second question -- I added the 3800 so I would have a lower-cost option for printing with Mk ink on art papers than doing an ink swap in the 7800 or buying a second 7800 dedicated to Mk ink.  Since I only print on thicker sheet-stock for art papers, I did not need another roll-fed printer.  I also liked the option of being able to print a handfull 4x6's or 5x7's on single sheets when desired.  Add that it fit on the printer stand next to my computer -- and for as rarely as I need one, it can serve as my everyday desktop plain paper printer.  In these last two uses, the 3800 replaces an R800.

Cheers,
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=88146\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Thank you very much.  It answers my questions sufficiently--esp. since you are just starting to print with this printer.  Will you print only 16 x 20 as largest in sheet?  The rest makes a lot of sense to me.  I don't need a very large format printer--my very large (non gallery prints--for commercial clients) are done through a graphics lab.  I will print the occasional 16 x 24 (hand cut sheets as I see it now) and smaller.  

I've even pulled out a long mothballed 1280 for my 'everyday' printer LOL--I couldn't make much sense of what to buy otherwise for now.

Thanks for your impressions.  I'm looking forward to receiving mine--though the list I'm on seems to be long LOL.  I'll continue to print monos with QTR on my 2200 until I get it---and then use the 2200 as an 'experimental' printer for fabric and exotic paper printer--and it could end up a dedicated b/w depending upon how I feel about monos with the 3800.

Diane
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DiaAzul
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« Reply #18 on: December 01, 2006, 07:05:18 PM »
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Mine is en-route! I have never done ethernet printing before. I am on OSX, and all three of my computers are networked together through one of those ordinary Linksys 4 port switch/routers you get anywhere. Any info on how one does ethernet printing? I am presently set up as a USB print shop.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=88150\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

If you have three computers already networked then the printer is no harder to add to the network. As Jack has pointed out above you need to read the intructions on the CD before you install the printer...it would appear the poster included with the printer is not sufficient and logic does not appear to have entered into the equation. Once the printer is set up..you can enter a fixed IP or use DHCP then you can do the rest of the config from the PC.

Only big problem so far is that it is possible to print with the front cover of the printer closed, causing the printer to jam. This is pointless penny pinching when it is possible to network the machine into a different room - I now have to walk round and check the printer before printing anything. Bah!
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David Plummer    http://photo.tanzo.org/
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« Reply #19 on: December 01, 2006, 07:10:30 PM »
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Mine is en-route! I have never done ethernet printing before. I am on OSX, and all three of my computers are networked together through one of those ordinary Linksys 4 port switch/routers you get anywhere. Any info on how one does ethernet printing? I am presently set up as a USB print shop.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=88150\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
if you are in mac osX, just plug in the printer in your hub, go to printer setup and add your printer....just like you would any other usb or firewire printer....i found ethernet printing to be extremely slow though....printing a large file really takes a long time for the printer to spool....i wish epson would go gigabit ethernet...the 10/100 is too slow
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