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Author Topic: Just finished installing my 3800!  (Read 25343 times)
Jack Flesher
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« Reply #20 on: December 01, 2006, 07:48:59 PM »
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Only big problem so far is that it is possible to print with the front cover of the printer closed, causing the printer to jam. This is pointless penny pinching when it is possible to network the machine into a different room - I now have to walk round and check the printer before printing anything. Bah!
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=88160\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

David: That front cover pops off very easily, just gentily pull one end off the nub on the tray and the whole thing pops off.  I pulled mine off immediately after the first print -- what a useless design    And yes, the remaning amount of exit tray is long enough to hold a 17x22 sheet, but the end hangs off a bit.
« Last Edit: December 01, 2006, 07:56:49 PM by Jack Flesher » Logged

Jack Flesher
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« Reply #21 on: December 01, 2006, 07:55:40 PM »
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Will you print only 16 x 20 as largest in sheet?  [a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=88154\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Hi Dianne:  17x22 Mk on fine art paper is probably the largest single sheet I will print on that printer, but I have the 7800 for my regular Pk papers and larger work.  FWIW you can enter custom paper sizes up to something like 37-1/2" long by up to 17 inches wide, so you could cut your own single sheets from rolls if you want.  IOW, 16x24 would be easy, but since it isn't a standard paper size, you'd need to cut it from 16" or 24" wide rolls.

Cheers,
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jjlphoto
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« Reply #22 on: December 01, 2006, 10:27:33 PM »
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...i found ethernet printing to be extremely slow though....printing a large file really takes a long time for the printer to spool....
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=88161\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Slower than the USB port on my 1.5gHz 15" G4 PowerBook? (I think it is a USB1)
« Last Edit: December 01, 2006, 10:27:50 PM by jjlphoto » Logged

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picnic
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« Reply #23 on: December 01, 2006, 11:07:04 PM »
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Hi all,

I have 3 3800s in stock right now. We went through a pallette-full yesterday in preorders.
These will go quick, so if you want one, email me quick!

Cliff
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=88069\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
Smarty that I am----I mentioned this to someone else---thinking that they would all be gone and I didn't email myself.  That person got the last one--and here I sit with the retailer whose list I'm on being unsure of shipments--with a VERY long list.  I may have to start looking around.  I'd really really like it before the end of the year.

Addendum:  I believe I have resolved this--will know by the end of next week.

Diane
« Last Edit: December 02, 2006, 05:46:45 PM by picnic » Logged
pss
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« Reply #24 on: December 01, 2006, 11:44:37 PM »
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Slower than the USB port on my 1.5gHz 15" G4 PowerBook? (I think it is a USB1)
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=88188\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]


i think bluetooth is faster then USB1:)
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BillK
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« Reply #25 on: December 01, 2006, 11:48:05 PM »
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Smarty that I am----I mentioned this to someone else---thinking that they would all be gone and I didn't email myself.  That person got the last one--and here I sit with the retailer whose list I'm on being unsure of shipments--with a VERY long list.  I may have to start looking around.  I'd really really like it before the end of the year.

Diane
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=88189\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]


Sorry Diane, that would be me that got the last one.  

I encourage you to call around, I'd bet there still might be one available
somewhere.  Might just take some time and effort on the phone.

I couldn't find anyplace on the net that showed them available, not even Samy's,
but as it turned out Samy's did have a few.

And Cliff if you read this, I got the tracking #, thanks.

Diane, good luck in your search,
Bill
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Dale Allyn
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« Reply #26 on: December 02, 2006, 12:12:56 AM »
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I don't know if it helps, Diane, but Pictureline (www.pictureline.com) shows them in stock for about $1,295. I bought my iPF5000 from them and was very happy with the service. I worked with Ken who was quite helpful.

Good luck,

Dale
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Rhossydd
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« Reply #27 on: December 02, 2006, 01:46:55 AM »
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You can build 10 presets via the LCD panel or using the "Remote Panel" where you set paper type and thickness, platten gap and custom align the head-gap to that specific paper --   
but the custom paper parameters do not switch.  You need to set them manually, even to get back to the default "standard" setting.

What isn't clear to me is if the custom settings made on the printer's menu system over-ride the OS printer driver's instructions.
If they do, it's a potential problem as it isn't flagged anywhere in the driver that it's settings are being ignored.
If the custom settings were made for a thin paper type and you then put a thicker paper in, you would risk the heads hitting the thicker paper and doing some damage.

Is this custom paper setting menu an option on the larger format printers ? If so how does it work there ?

It all seems poorly documented and an area for misunderstandings.

Thanks

Paul Holman
www.colourprofiles.com
« Last Edit: December 02, 2006, 01:47:43 AM by Rhossydd » Logged
digitaldog
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« Reply #28 on: December 02, 2006, 07:40:04 AM »
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if you are in mac osX, just plug in the printer in your hub, go to printer setup and add your printer....just like you would any other usb or firewire printer....i found ethernet printing to be extremely slow though....printing a large file really takes a long time for the printer to spool....i wish epson would go gigabit ethernet...the 10/100 is too slow
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=88161\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

I had no issues under OSX either. I don't know it's slower (didn't run tests) but it sure is convenient if you're printing from multiple machines. I'm on 100 bast T, seems to send the data rather quickly. I did have an issue losing the network connection when shutting off the machine. I've just been keeping it on all the time (another one of those Epson debates. Greg Gorman told me he never shuts off his printers, good enough for me).
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Andrew Rodney
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CliffSamys
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« Reply #29 on: December 02, 2006, 11:53:27 AM »
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I had no issues under OSX either. I don't know it's slower (didn't run tests) but it sure is convenient if you're printing from multiple machines. I'm on 100 bast T, seems to send the data rather quickly. I did have an issue losing the network connection when shutting off the machine. I've just been keeping it on all the time (another one of those Epson debates. Greg Gorman told me he never shuts off his printers, good enough for me).
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=88230\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

I never turn my computers, printers or any related eqpt off. That being said, the printer should not fall off the network. Did it happen more than once? Try logging into the printer's IP through Safari (or any web browser) and assigning it a static IP. Make it something far from your DHCP pool. In other words, if your machines are all 10.0.1.1, 10.0.1.2, 10.0.1.3 etc, make the printer 10.0.1.50. Some routers also provide for a static IP pool, but simply making it far from the rest of the numbers would accomplish the same thing: prevent 2 machines from having the same IP.
I find network printing fast and have never had much luck with Epsons on firewire. If not networked, I generally go USB.
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Cliff
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Jack Flesher
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« Reply #30 on: December 02, 2006, 05:23:35 PM »
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What isn't clear to me is if the custom settings made on the printer's menu system over-ride the OS printer driver's instructions.
If they do, it's a potential problem as it isn't flagged anywhere in the driver that it's settings are being ignored.
If the custom settings were made for a thin paper type and you then put a thicker paper in, you would risk the heads hitting the thicker paper and doing some damage.

Is this custom paper setting menu an option on the larger format printers ? If so how does it work there ?

It all seems poorly documented and an area for misunderstandings.

Thanks

Paul Holman
www.colourprofiles.com
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=88208\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

First off, it appears it only partially over-rides any driver input, but I cannot confirm this and the documentation appears silent on the issue.  

I can tell you I wasted a sheet of Luster because it printed out with a custom setting for Fine Art paper with a wide platen gap setting and the icon for the custom paper was lit on the printer's LCD as the Luster spewed out...  However, the colors appeared reasonably good on that sheet of luster, which I would not have expected since the custom setting was for Mk ink and Ultrasmooth FA paper.  I had chosen luster in the driver and the software did change the ink, so it probably chose the Luster paper too, but it did appear to leave the mechanical settings of wide platen gap and different alignment setting intact.  Bottom line, is you need to be sure to manually set the printer to the correct paper option before printing...  

There are also custom paper options on the larger x800 printers and were also on the x600 printers.  However since I only print on coated Pk stock with my 7800, I've never had to use a custom paper setting on that printer.  I did have to use one for Fine Art papers and Mk ink in my 7600 -- a wider platen gap and longer drying time to avoid roller marks -- and again, that was a manual setting done at the printer LCD.

How to set up the custom settings is reasonably well documented -- what isn't well documented is exactly what is happening in the driver when you use them...
« Last Edit: December 02, 2006, 05:25:12 PM by Jack Flesher » Logged

pss
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« Reply #31 on: December 02, 2006, 05:32:41 PM »
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I never turn my computers, printers or any related eqpt off. That being said, the printer should not fall off the network. Did it happen more than once? Try logging into the printer's IP through Safari (or any web browser) and assigning it a static IP. Make it something far from your DHCP pool. In other words, if your machines are all 10.0.1.1, 10.0.1.2, 10.0.1.3 etc, make the printer 10.0.1.50. Some routers also provide for a static IP pool, but simply making it far from the rest of the numbers would accomplish the same thing: prevent 2 machines from having the same IP.
I find network printing fast and have never had much luck with Epsons on firewire. If not networked, I generally go USB.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=88270\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

i never turn my 4800 off...i always use firewire, fast and relyable for me...i guess it is nice to have 3 options! btw: epson told me that having the printer on ethernet and firewire on at the same time would not work....no problem here....when i am at the desk, the firewire conection is active, when i take the powerbook around the studio, ethernet printing is active through airport....
my problem with ethernet printing seems to be the spool time....with firewire it takes a couple of seconds, maybe half a minute, on ethernet it takes 5-10 minutes....never had any dropped connections though...
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BJNY
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« Reply #32 on: December 02, 2006, 05:40:32 PM »
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Jack,
Is getting the Pro version with ColorBurst RIP software a good idea?
Thanks,
Billy
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Guillermo
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« Reply #33 on: December 02, 2006, 09:24:18 PM »
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Jack,
Is getting the Pro version with ColorBurst RIP software a good idea?
Thanks,
Billy
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=88314\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]


Do you want to proof work that will be printed in CMYK ?
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Jack Flesher
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« Reply #34 on: December 03, 2006, 05:27:41 PM »
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Jack,
Is getting the Pro version with ColorBurst RIP software a good idea?
Thanks,
Billy
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=88314\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

First off, the RIP included with the 3800 Pro bundle is a clipped version of ColorBurst and not ImagePrint (IP is considered the gold-standard of RIPs)...  It is a partial version in that it only works with Epson papers, but I think you can upgrade it to the full version at a cost, but I don't know what that cost is or what additional papers are included.  In general, if you are not doing proofing, only printing for yourself and only using a few different papers, I think a good paper profiling tool is a better place to spend your money than a RIP.  Other opinions may vary on this.  

I will say the few canned profiles I tested were very good.  Experience tells me my own custom profiles are going to be better so I go ahead and build them as a matter of course for every new printer I get -- but that practice may be getting less necessary as the latest prniters seem to be more consistent and being delivered with better profiles  -- at least for their own brand papers.    

My bottom line comment is this: The standard version 3800 is an extremely capable imaging tool straight out of the box when using Epson papers and the included profiles.  I think anybody who buys one will not be disappointed.  I am also a big fan of Epson's encapsulated K3 inks and as such feel this printer brings the best pro quality large format output within the reach of most serious users.  In that regard, I feel it is a break-through product -- much like the 2200 was a few years ago -- and will likely have the competition scrambling to play catch up again when 3800 supply lines get filled.  How's that for going out on a limb?

Cheers,
« Last Edit: December 03, 2006, 05:29:12 PM by Jack Flesher » Logged

henk
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« Reply #35 on: December 04, 2006, 01:22:34 PM »
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 I got my 3800 this morning and installed it with no problem as a USB printer. Installing drivers and the other software was a piece off cake!
Going into CS2 and print my RGB, B&W test print, with a very familiar interface, ( come from a 2100),  shows that in the 0 black area I get a 2,45 Dmax!! I used The ColorVision Spectrocolorimeter. I can’t see any metamerisme and the tonality is very smooth and neutral. I printed on Innova F-type and used the Epson Premium Luster Photo Paper setting and the B&W advanced setting with Tint to Normal since I did not had the time to do a custom profile.

So far I am happy as a …. ( what’s the English expression for Ultimate very happy ?)
I choose the Epson 3800 because of the weight, dimensions ( just a bit larger than my former 2100) and because my work is 75% B&W. I expected the 3800 with its K3 ink not to disappoint. Well so far it din’t!

Keep you posted on my findings.

Henk
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jjlphoto
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« Reply #36 on: December 04, 2006, 02:45:04 PM »
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My .02 on RIPs- Back in the day, (2000?    ) the supplied Epson drivers were ...well..something akin to a redheaded step-child. Enter the third party software developers. ImagePrint is perhaps the best known inkjet RIP and best of the bunch.

Presently, Epson drivers are much better products, and may now suffice for many users. There are still things that only a RIP can do, so carefully evaluate your needs as RIP software is veeery expensive.
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« Reply #37 on: December 04, 2006, 02:53:58 PM »
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i used to only print with imageprint RIP....but with the new inks most of the BW printing issues are gone, the new canned profiles are much much better and i now use www.inkjetart.com for custom profiles for the papers i use....download the target, print it, mail it in, get the profile via email, costs 25$ absolutely worth it...they told me about it when i wanted to get a calibration device (for 1500$)...now i have had 4 profiles done, spent a lot less and all my future profiles will all be made with the latest and greatest devices....highly recommended....
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picnic
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« Reply #38 on: December 04, 2006, 03:56:51 PM »
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I got my 3800 this morning and installed it with no problem as a USB printer. Installing drivers and the other software was a piece off cake!
Going into CS2 and print my RGB, B&W test print, with a very familiar interface, ( come from a 2100),  shows that in the 0 black area I get a 2,45 Dmax!! I used The ColorVision Spectrocolorimeter. I can’t see any metamerisme and the tonality is very smooth and neutral. I printed on Innova F-type and used the Epson Premium Luster Photo Paper setting and the B&W advanced setting with Tint to Normal since I did not had the time to do a custom profile.

So far I am happy as a …. ( what’s the English expression for Ultimate very happy ?)
I choose the Epson 3800 because of the weight, dimensions ( just a bit larger than my former 2100) and because my work is 75% B&W. I expected the 3800 with its K3 ink not to disappoint. Well so far it din’t!

Keep you posted on my findings.

Henk
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=88627\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Well, you've made me happy too.  I'm supposed to be getting mine the end of the week.  The fact that you do so much b/w and are happy with it is good to hear---its one of the reasons to move up to the K3 printer from the 2200 (where I use QTR for monos).   One of the things I'm hoping for is that I'll be able to tone my own as I please--as RGB---and print 'as is' so to speak (not using ABW where I will have to do some experimentation to get what I want--with no preview).  As I understood it--though I could be misunderstanding him--Andrew Rodney believes that I will be able to do this--esp. with a good paper profile.  Have you tried this---or just with ABW?

Diane
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jjlphoto
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« Reply #39 on: December 04, 2006, 04:08:23 PM »
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Going into CS2 and print my RGB, B&W test print, with a very familiar interface, ( come from a 2100),  shows that in the 0 black area I get a 2,45 Dmax!! I used The ColorVision Spectrocolorimeter. I can’t see any metamerisme and the tonality is very smooth and neutral. I printed on Innova F-type and used the Epson Premium Luster Photo Paper setting and the B&W advanced setting with Tint to Normal since I did not had the time to do a custom profile.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=88627\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

I've got some Innove Fiba F coming this week (and my 3800 shipped out on Friday). I am only familiar with the "NoColorAdjustment"/Profiles method of printing, and am not experienced when it comes to the using the features in the color controls side of the Epson driver itself.  Care to elaborate in more detail on your B&W print settings, like media setting, and other color controls?
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