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Author Topic: Just finished installing my 3800!  (Read 25313 times)
Jack Flesher
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« Reply #40 on: December 04, 2006, 04:54:14 PM »
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One of the things I'm hoping for is that I'll be able to tone my own as I please--as RGB---and print 'as is' so to speak (not using ABW where I will have to do some experimentation to get what I want--with no preview). As I understood it--though I could be misunderstanding him--Andrew Rodney believes that I will be able to do this--esp. with a good paper profile. Have you tried this---or just with ABW?

Diane
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=88646\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Your wish is answered

That is how I have printing B&W since I got my first K3 printer!  I use my regular color paper profile and print it just like any other color image.  If I use no toning, I get an excellent neutral continuous tone grayscale -- lovely!  Alternatively I have built some toning actions and can easily warm/sepia  or cool/selenium tone the B&W to taste, or even split tone them.  And for the kicker, this works just as well on coated photo papers as it does on fine art papers.  

In other words, we are essentially getting WYSIWYG B&W printing...  Yes, life is good  with K3 inks
« Last Edit: December 04, 2006, 04:58:29 PM by Jack Flesher » Logged

picnic
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« Reply #41 on: December 04, 2006, 05:36:09 PM »
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Your wish is answered :)


<snip>
In other words, we are essentially getting WYSIWYG B&W printing...  Yes, life is good  with K3 inks :lol:
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=88662\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]


Ahhhhhhhhhhhhhh......   Now I just can't wait for mine.  I have a photo job waiting--monos, my decision as to neutral or toned, 16 x 20 or 16 x 24 (my last work for them I had to have printed on a 7600 )--and had to work with what ink/paper combo the printmaker chose.  I'm excited to try it.  Its definitely what I've been hoping for--though QTR is great---I still had experimentation to deal with with blending curves, ink density, etc.  

Thank you Jack.

Diane
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jjlphoto
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« Reply #42 on: December 04, 2006, 07:24:31 PM »
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Hey Jack- is it just me, or is does your lion avatar have one blue eye and one green eye?
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Jack Flesher
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« Reply #43 on: December 04, 2006, 07:49:49 PM »
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Hey Jack- is it just me, or is does your lion avatar have one blue eye and one green eye?
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=88696\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Yep -- One green and one blue.
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jjlphoto
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« Reply #44 on: December 07, 2006, 05:43:44 PM »
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Just got mine ramped up today. Very easy!

1-Remove about 100 pieces of blue tape.
2-Install ink carts.
3-Turn on, printer charges heads.
4-Connect USB line, load driver CD.
5-Insert paper and press "print nozzle check".
6-Paper does not load because 101st piece of tape is still in feeder tray.
7-Remove last piece of tape.
8-Print nozzle check, run a cleaning cycle.
9-Print nozzle check.
10-Print my favorite test image from Andrew Rodney's site using supplied Epson profile for PLPP @1440.
11-Print comes out in record time with perfect grey neutrality and color.
12-Toss 1280 in the dumpster while shaking my head in disgust that I actually thought that my 1280 was a good printer.

Now onto some custom papers for B&W like Innova and Museo.
« Last Edit: December 07, 2006, 05:48:17 PM by jjlphoto » Logged

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picnic
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« Reply #45 on: December 07, 2006, 05:53:49 PM »
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Just got mine ramped up today. Very easy!

1-Remove about 100 pieces of blue tape.
2-Install ink carts.
3-Turn on, printer charges heads.
4-Connect USB line, load driver CD.
5-Insert paper and press "print nozzle check".
6-Paper does not load because 101st piece of tape is still in feeder tray.
7-Remove last piece of tape.
8-Print nozzle check, run a cleaning cycle.
9-Print nozzle check.
10-Print my favorite test image from Andrew Rodney's site using supplied Epson profile for PLPP @1440.
11-Print comes out in record time with perfect grey neutrality and color.
12-Toss 1280 in the dumpster while shaking my head in disgust that I actually thought that my 1280 was a good printer.

Now onto some custom papers for B&W like Innova and Museo.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=89295\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

You could tell us what you REALLY think LOL.  I, too, have a 1280--but moved to a 2200 from that.  I loved my 2200 (except for monos and used QTR) but when I saw the Epson b/w sample---I wished I had bought a 2400 earlier---then kicked myself because then i wouldn't be buying a 3800 now (mine is due early next week).

I will look out for that 101st piece of tape.

Diane
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jjlphoto
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« Reply #46 on: December 07, 2006, 06:01:26 PM »
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.....I, too, have a 1280--but moved to a 2200 from that.....
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=89297\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

I was at a seminar several years ago in Chicago put on by Jeff Schewe, Andrew Rodney, and John Paul Caponigro right when the 2200 hit. Almost bought one, but passed. Watched the 2400 come out, passed again. This one seemed too good to be true, but after just an hour, it seems that inkjet printing has really come of age with this baby.
« Last Edit: December 07, 2006, 06:02:27 PM by jjlphoto » Logged

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NikosR
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« Reply #47 on: December 08, 2006, 03:46:36 AM »
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You could tell us what you REALLY think LOL. I, too, have a 1280--but moved to a 2200 from that. I loved my 2200 (except for monos and used QTR) but when I saw the Epson b/w sample---I wished I had bought a 2400 earlier---then kicked myself because then i wouldn't be buying a 3800 now (mine is due early next week).

I will look out for that 101st piece of tape.

Diane
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=89297\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

I too have had a 2100(2200) for some years now. I have been using QTR with the UC inks for my moderate BW.

I just got my 3800 the other day, and just yesterday I managed to do some tests with BW. I used ABW printing on Ilford Smooth Gloss and Hahn. Fine Art Pearl. Wow! the difference was amazing. While the QTR prints had managed to contain the UC inks metamerism 99%, some bronzing and some gloss differential was still quite evident. Happy to report I got no sign of bronzing from the 3800 (absolutely none) and while I could still (very hardly) distinguish a slight amount of gloss dif. on the Ilford, I could see none on the FAP. Nice! Also no metamerism to speak of (magenta- green shifts under different illuminants). Checked this under tungsten, under Solux, under GTI D50 fluorescent, under household fluorescent, indirect daylight, even direct sunlight. None. Could see the expected warmer / colder hues depending on light but no magenta-green shifts.

Having said that, I didn't like at all the toning the ABW defaults would give me (looked too greenish to me) but I didn't have time to experiment with changing the settings. Also, I haven't tested normal color (with color profiles) BW printing on the 3800 yet.
« Last Edit: December 08, 2006, 03:51:50 AM by NikosR » Logged

Nikos
jjlphoto
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« Reply #48 on: December 08, 2006, 08:59:03 AM »
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I've got some packs of 8.5 x 11 Innova FibaPrint F-Type Brilliant White Gloss and Crane Museo Silver Rag coming for some B&W tests. I'll try making some profiles with my GMB i1 Pro with Match 3 software and see what that baby will really do! The Museo is supposed to be run with PK ink, the Innova with PM ink.
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Gregory
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« Reply #49 on: December 08, 2006, 10:23:04 AM »
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You also need to manually build and select a custom paper type for the thicker paper. You can build 10 presets via the LCD panel or using the "Remote Panel" where you set paper type and thickness, platten gap and custom align the head-gap to that specific paper -- a spiffy set of options for maximum print quality, especially considering the variables in different fine art papers.[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=88137\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
Please excuse the beginner's question.

I'm almost definitely getting one of these printers when they're released in Hong Kong later this month (as the 3850). I've waited a long time for a printer that can faithfully print the colours in my wildlife (mostly birds) photos.

My question. I purchased some fine art paper when I was in L.A. a month ago. The paper is not cheap! How do I go about discovering or calculating the best settings for my papers, and how do I do it without using more paper than necessary?

(and what is a platten gap?)

regards,
Gregory
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madmanchan
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« Reply #50 on: December 08, 2006, 12:55:43 PM »
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I've got some packs of 8.5 x 11 Innova FibaPrint F-Type Brilliant White Gloss and Crane Museo Silver Rag coming for some B&W tests. I'll try making some profiles with my GMB i1 Pro with Match 3 software and see what that baby will really do! The Museo is supposed to be run with PK ink, the Innova with PM ink.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=89394\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

If by "PM" you mean the matte black ink, then I think you're incorrect here. The Innova FibaPrint White Gloss paper is most definitely intended to be used with Photo Black (PK) ink. That is not to say that you cannot use MK ink, just that you most likely will not achieve deep blacks.

Eric
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jjlphoto
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« Reply #51 on: December 08, 2006, 01:04:03 PM »
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If by "PM" you mean the matte black ink, then I think you're incorrect here. The Innova FibaPrint White Gloss paper is most definitely intended to be used with Photo Black (PK) ink. That is not to say that you cannot use MK ink, just that you most likely will not achieve deep blacks.

Eric
[{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Acording to the info from the Innova folks, they recommend Matte Black Ink.
[a href=\"http://www.anwcrestwood.com/innova/innova_icc.cfm]http://www.anwcrestwood.com/innova/innova_icc.cfm[/url]

If there is other published data regarding use of Innova with Photo Black, I'm all ears. Don't want to have to switch between blacks anymore than needed!
« Last Edit: December 08, 2006, 02:18:41 PM by jjlphoto » Logged

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madmanchan
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« Reply #52 on: December 08, 2006, 01:55:14 PM »
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Acording to the info from the Innova folks, they recommend Matte Black Ink.
http://www.anwcrestwood.com/innova/innova_icc.cfm

If there is other published data regarding use of Innova with Photo Black, I'm all ears. Don't want to have to switch between blacks anymore than needed!

My understanding of the difference between Photo Black and Matte Black is that Matte Black is a darker ink because using matte stock with Photo Black ink does not result in the blacks being "black" enough, and if you use Matte Black ink on glossy stock, the ink will lay unevenly and unpredictably because it is to intense.

From Ink Jet Art's website:
"......if you had the Photo Black loaded and wanted to print on matte paper you got an image with less density and richness......."
[{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Hi John, that site is referring to the older FibaPrint Ultrasmooth 280 matte paper by Innova, which is designed for Matte Black inks. The newer FibaPrint White Gloss F-Type is a different paper altogether, which takes Photo Black ink. Part of the confusion is that Innova has a lot of papers with the name FibaPrint in them, but they are not all the same. Here is Eric Kunsman's review over at BookSmartStudio, for more info:

[a href=\"http://www.booksmartstudio.com/services.php?section=85&a=33]http://www.booksmartstudio.com/services.php?section=85&a=33[/url]

Eric
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jjlphoto
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« Reply #53 on: December 08, 2006, 02:00:00 PM »
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Eric-

Thanks!

What is the recommended media setting for Innova FibaPrint White Gloss F-Type on a 3800? The folks at Crane recommend Premium Lustre Photo Paper for Museo Silver Rag.
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madmanchan
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« Reply #54 on: December 08, 2006, 09:47:55 PM »
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Eric-

Thanks!

What is the recommended media setting for Innova FibaPrint White Gloss F-Type on a 3800? The folks at Crane recommend Premium Lustre Photo Paper for Museo Silver Rag.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=89450\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Unfortunately, I don't know!  I don't actually have a 3800 myself.  I'm hoping to upgrade at some point from my old 2200 to the 3800, but haven't done so yet.  I think you'll have to experiment with using either Premium Luster, Premium Glossy, Premium Semi-Matte, or Premium Semi-Gloss. One way to make this reasonably economical (since the paper itself is pricey) is to print some small hue targets (say, 4 to a page, each with a different paper type setting) and compare them side by side.

If you go to Bill Atkinson's page, then go to the Color Profiles download, you'll see a set of Profile Test Images. In there you'll find a RGB Hues Target that may help you get an idea of which settings produce the deepest blacks and the most saturated colors.

Eric
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henk
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« Reply #55 on: December 09, 2006, 09:50:51 AM »
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Eric-

Thanks!

What is the recommended media setting for Innova FibaPrint White Gloss F-Type on a 3800? The folks at Crane recommend Premium Lustre Photo Paper for Museo Silver Rag.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=89450\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

I use Prem. luster as setting because I stiil had no time to de a custom profile and I am very pleased with the results. Further settings are: neutral end dark with High speed off.
I will have some more time to experiment, also with color,in the last week of the year. I will report on that.

Henk
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jeffok
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« Reply #56 on: December 09, 2006, 10:38:33 PM »
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Your wish is answered

That is how I have printing B&W since I got my first K3 printer!  I use my regular color paper profile and print it just like any other color image.  If I use no toning, I get an excellent neutral continuous tone grayscale -- lovely!  Alternatively I have built some toning actions and can easily warm/sepia  or cool/selenium tone the B&W to taste, or even split tone them.  And for the kicker, this works just as well on coated photo papers as it does on fine art papers. 

In other words, we are essentially getting WYSIWYG B&W printing...  Yes, life is good  with K3 inks
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=88662\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

I wonder if anyone (Jack?) might know how to fix a problem I am having with printing BW on the 3800. I seem to get vertical banding throughout the image when its printed whether I print "color' or with ABW.

In CS2 for windows.
With color, I choose Print with preview and settings as follows:
Let PS determine colors
Pro38 EMP
Relative colorimetric
then under print properties I choose:
enhanced matte paper
color
then choose custom
select the advanced button
turn off high speed
choose Off (no color adjustment)
and then print

I get banding no matter what I seem to do.
Tried aligning the heads, no effect

what could the problem be?
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jeffok
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« Reply #57 on: December 09, 2006, 11:41:00 PM »
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Well, I now get to answer my own question, but it reveals something I wouldn't have expected in a brand new printer I have had for two whole days.

I did a print head alignment on the 3800 from the printer control panel. Then I did an automatic nozzle check and the printer went through a long cycle of cleaning the nozzles. Put in a fresh sheet of paper and printed the same image and, voila!, no banding and everything looks great.

EXCEPT, I never would have expected to have to do all that- two days and only about 6 prints after I turned on the machine for the first time. My ink levels are already down to 75% and my maintenance cartridge is at 54%! The images look great but I'm not impressed with these other issues so far.

Jeff
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Jack Flesher
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« Reply #58 on: December 10, 2006, 12:09:11 AM »
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FWIW, obvious banding on an Epson printer almost always is an indication of a nozzle clog where micro-banding is usually a head alignment issue.

The fact that it happened on a new printer early on is probably not cause for alarm.  If you continue to have problems, then I'd give a call to Epson service and get it looked at.  

Cheers,
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howie
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« Reply #59 on: December 10, 2006, 08:59:53 AM »
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FWIW, I had the same problem (but I hadn't made any prints yet).  My nozzle checks and manual cleaning cycle failed, so I put it into auto nozzle check/clean.  I didn't want to do that initially, afraid that the automated mode would use more ink, however ultimately it was the mode that worked.  In retrospect, I wonder if the auto clean/check is smart and will only clean the nozzle that's clogged, but there's no way to tell.

My levels ended up at around the same place as yours, But after a bunch of letter size prints haven't moved appreciably.  The reports are pretty cool.  I wish they included how much ink is used in the cleaning cycles.
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