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Author Topic: Landscape & Climate similarities  (Read 3685 times)
opgr
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« on: December 03, 2006, 08:50:29 AM »
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The more I hike the locations which are considered to depict the authentic landscaping and vegetation of my country, the more I feel there are distinct similarities between the patterns and character of the original (authentic) vegetation and landscaping of a location and the visual character of the corresponding climate, e.g. cloud patterns, light peculiarities etc...

Do any of you also see such similarities for your specific location? Would you have pictures that depict this "character" of the locale? Is it just occupational deformation, or is it something tangible?
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Oscar Rysdyk
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Ray
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« Reply #1 on: February 06, 2007, 08:19:57 PM »
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The more I hike the locations which are considered to depict the authentic landscaping and vegetation of my country, the more I feel there are distinct similarities between the patterns and character of the original (authentic) vegetation and landscaping of a location and the visual character of the corresponding climate, e.g. cloud patterns, light peculiarities etc...

Do any of you also see such similarities for your specific location? Would you have pictures that depict this "character" of the locale? Is it just occupational deformation, or is it something tangible?
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This is a rather obscure subject. It's no wonder your post has not received any replies.

I get the impression that the vegatation of the land, in general, affects the climate in that particular region. There have been many proposals in Australia to irrigate the arid regions by pumping water through pipes along great distances from the regions that suffer from frequent floods. The general idea is that once vegetation and trees are established in the arid regions, the climate gradually changes to support that vegitation. No doubt this is an oversimplification.
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wolfnowl
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« Reply #2 on: February 07, 2007, 01:30:52 AM »
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Putting on my biologist hat, I'd say that in the simplist terms, yes you are right.  Topography, vegetation and a number of other factors can affect the microclimate of an area and this will be reflected in what you're talking about.  An example... take a large contiguous forest.  Now clearcut a few thousand acres of trees.  Since the roots are no longer holding water in the soil, since they're no longer providing shade, and since they're no longer breathing water vapour back into the air (to name a few things), this will definitely affect the micro climate.  

  You also have to look at concentric levels, though, because climate patterns occur over areas larger than you can take in any one shot (except from the Hubble).

Mike
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If your mind is attuned to beauty, you find beauty in everything.
~ Jean Cooke ~


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