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Author Topic: IPF5000 for amature hobbyist printing  (Read 12943 times)
naisan
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« Reply #20 on: December 08, 2006, 02:08:30 AM »
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As far as amateur/non-techie with lots of time to spend on this printer - buy an epson 1800 or hp9180 and you'll be happy.

In fact, if you just print color, look at the HP DJ series.

the iPF5000 seems like it has great potential, but the fact that it needs a wiki should tell you all you need to know about the "ease of use"
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martinmitch
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« Reply #21 on: December 08, 2006, 03:22:32 AM »
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As far as amateur/non-techie with lots of time to spend on this printer - buy an epson 1800 or hp9180 and you'll be happy.

In fact, if you just print color, look at the HP DJ series.

the iPF5000 seems like it has great potential, but the fact that it needs a wiki should tell you all you need to know about the "ease of use"
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Hello,
The Canon iPF5000 is not a printer that is difficult to understand.
What are you trying to say?
If there is Wiki concerning the iPF5000 it makes it easier to use,there is plenty of inforemation on the web about this printer it is reliable,easier to maintain and once you learn how to use this printer produces better prints than other 17" inkjet printers.
It's insulting to use terms such as amatuer or non/techie this printer has a mystique built around it becauese it threatens the cosy world of Epson printers,continous comparison between the two surely should be over after six months since iPf5000 introduction.[ and if I had the money would buy the new larger 12 ink HP printer- one tries to use best product on the market in printing]
This printer is not difficult to comprehend with so much inforemation on the webb and is an economical dependable 12 ink printer that is developing its own character and reputation because of its solid build quality producing outstading A2 iknjet prints.
Bye
Martin
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etrexler
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« Reply #22 on: December 08, 2006, 08:16:44 AM »
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It also huge!  I was looking at the Canon and the Epson 3800 and the Canon is literally the size of my car's dashboard.  I don't drive a Prius.

Eric
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Tony B.
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« Reply #23 on: December 08, 2006, 12:49:13 PM »
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Naisan, as mentioned in previous posts.  I would buy the IPF5000 (or Epson/HP 17") printer because of ink savings over time.  My opinion is if you have the space and you do any amount of printing then the larger printers have a much lower ink cost.  I do not need the large format printing ability at this time but maybe I would grow into it.  If I do not get the Canon/Epson/HP larger format printer then I will get the i9900 for the ink costs (3rd party inks) and live with the fading issues until I have a greater need for pigment ink.

Tony

Quote
As far as amateur/non-techie with lots of time to spend on this printer - buy an epson 1800 or hp9180 and you'll be happy.

In fact, if you just print color, look at the HP DJ series.

the iPF5000 seems like it has great potential, but the fact that it needs a wiki should tell you all you need to know about the "ease of use"
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=89340\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
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Tony B.
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« Reply #24 on: December 13, 2006, 02:43:21 PM »
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First, I would like to thank Dale for printing out a few prints on the IPF5000 using Kirkland paper and sending them to me.

Anyways, I recieved the prints from Dale, they were test files from InkJetArt.
I then printed the same test file on my ip6000d and Kirkland paper so I could compare durability.  Yes, the IPF5000 (most likely all pigment based printers) print did show scratches (using fingernail) a little more than the ip6000d but my opinion is that they would be fine for calendar use.  The IPF5000 prints yellow changed color when scratching the ip6000d did not.  But unless they were purposely scrached or placed under an item that could scratch I do not think it is an issue.

So, only thing left for me to figure out is still ink costs.  I know we have some ink cost samples but I am looking for more.  I am trying to find a printer local that I can print a run of 10-12 8x10's (color landscape photo's) on Canon Photo Paper Pro or Kirkland paper and see what the ink usage average would be on that type of print run.

Thanks everyone so far.  If ink costs fall around the $.004 per square inch or less than I could afford what I use the printer for.  Any more than that and I will probably put this type of printer off until my needs change and get the i9900 until then.

Tony B.


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Tony B.,


All that being said, I would question the choice of a pigment ink printer for calendars, such as the iPF5000 or any number of others, because pigment inks tend to mar much more easily than dye based inks. This is particularly true in satin and gloss finished papers IMO.

I think I have some Kirkland paper around here and can make a print for the purpose of abusing it a bit, in order to see if it's an issue. But perhaps durability of the surface isn't really an issue and I'm over thinking things.

--
Dale
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jpara
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« Reply #25 on: December 13, 2006, 04:35:12 PM »
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While I agree ink and paper costs can add up to significant dollars, it seems you may be over analyzing these costs in making your decision.   I've read through your posts and it seems your printing demands are fairly moderate.  The iPF5000 is a professional printer, designed to be used regularly.  

What is the shelf life of an iPF5000 cartridge once installed in the printer.  I just purchased the Epson 3800 which uses 80ml cartridges at a cost between $45 - $60 per cartridge, and are expected to be usable for 6 months after installation.   Are you certain you will use all the ink in the even larger Canon cartridges before their usable life expires?  

Have you compared the prints from the iPF5000 with other manufacturers.  I like Canon printers as well, but I've found each manufacturer has it's strengths and weaknesses.  Given you have been exposed to pritns mostly from Canon dye inks, and  3rd party inks you may find Canon pigment inks to produce undesireable results.  

The research before the purchase is always the most fun.  I'm merely suggesting you take into account some other factors than the cost of ink in making your decision.
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Tony B.
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« Reply #26 on: December 13, 2006, 08:56:16 PM »
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jpara thanks for the reply.  I have not looked into the other printers much.  The only one I might be interested in is the Epson 3800.  But as far as searching goes it seems the Canon is better on ink.  And yes, I keep forgeting about shelf life.

I am not sure if I would use all the ink up before the in printer ink life is over.  It seems people have gone over a year with the Epsons.  I would also have to start asking friends if they want any prints and have been checking out local camera clubs to see if anyone would be interested in having prints done (for not much above ink/paper costs-at least at this time) because I would need to do something more to use the ink.

I have glanced at prints from other printers that are out on a shelf at Pictureline.  Again, they all look good.  I do not think I would be dissatisfied with any of the printers for print quality.

It looks like a found a source that I can go and print a small run of 10-12 8x10's to get an ink usage indication.  After that I will have to think more on the shelf life even though I would guess all manufacturer specs would be low (6 months).  Maybe I will be the person in one or two years to give better indication of in printer ink life.

Also, unless I discover something unexpected, ink cost is my primary concern (ok, right next to shelf life).   Great, I only spent $200 in ink this year  -To bad I need $900 in new cartridges because of shelf life  . If I can not come up with any better answers to shelf life and I do a run of prints and the ink usage is within my range I do not know what I will do.  I am trying not to rush into this but if I do not get it by the time the rebate ends I will not get it until it sells at the rebate price or they offer another rebate in the future.

Anyways, thanks for the input.  Hopefully Thursday or Friday I will do a small run of 8x10's (color on glossy paper) and post the results.  If the usage is to high then the printer will not fall into my budget.

Tony B.

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While I agree ink and paper costs can add up to significant dollars, it seems you may be over analyzing these costs in making your decision.   I've read through your posts and it seems your printing demands are fairly moderate.  The iPF5000 is a professional printer, designed to be used regularly. 

What is the shelf life of an iPF5000 cartridge once installed in the printer.  I just purchased the Epson 3800 which uses 80ml cartridges at a cost between $45 - $60 per cartridge, and are expected to be usable for 6 months after installation.   Are you certain you will use all the ink in the even larger Canon cartridges before their usable life expires? 

Have you compared the prints from the iPF5000 with other manufacturers.  I like Canon printers as well, but I've found each manufacturer has it's strengths and weaknesses.  Given you have been exposed to pritns mostly from Canon dye inks, and  3rd party inks you may find Canon pigment inks to produce undesireable results. 

The research before the purchase is always the most fun.  I'm merely suggesting you take into account some other factors than the cost of ink in making your decision.
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martinmitch
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« Reply #27 on: December 14, 2006, 02:30:42 AM »
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Hello,

Shelf life for inks with the CanoniPF5000 is printed on the side of packaging and running from date of purchase Nov'06 is 18 months.
Facts relating to my purchase full set of inks beginning last month.
Expiring date is 04-2008.
Purchase date01-2006.

Martin Mitchell
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martinmitch
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« Reply #28 on: December 14, 2006, 02:32:32 AM »
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Hello,

Shelf life for inks with the CanoniPF5000 is printed on the side of packaging and running from date of purchase Nov'06 is 18 months.
Facts relating to my purchase full set of inks beginning last month.
Expiring date is 04-2008.
Purchase date01-2006.

Martin Mitchell
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Sorry,should read.

 Purchase date10-2006
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jpara
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« Reply #29 on: December 14, 2006, 11:43:12 AM »
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That is shelf life unopened.  How long does Canon claim their inks last once the cartridge is installed in the printer?

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Hello,

Shelf life for inks with the CanoniPF5000 is printed on the side of packaging and running from date of purchase Nov'06 is 18 months.
Facts relating to my purchase full set of inks beginning last month.
Expiring date is 04-2008.
Purchase date01-2006.

Martin Mitchell
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John Hollenberg
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« Reply #30 on: December 14, 2006, 11:57:59 AM »
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That is shelf life unopened.  How long does Canon claim their inks last once the cartridge is installed in the printer?

I asked this very question of Canon support.  They had no information, and weren't even able to give me the shelf life unopened figure quoted in this thread.

--John
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O'Archie
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« Reply #31 on: December 14, 2006, 12:33:57 PM »
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I would not discourage someone from buying IPF5000 because of poor documentation. Wiki website is no different than yahoo group forums.....exchange of ideas and information to better utililize the printer. Look at the good side of Canon's poor documentation....we will all be a bit 'computer' and 'printer' smarter.


Quote
As far as amateur/non-techie with lots of time to spend on this printer - buy an epson 1800 or hp9180 and you'll be happy.

In fact, if you just print color, look at the HP DJ series.

the iPF5000 seems like it has great potential, but the fact that it needs a wiki should tell you all you need to know about the "ease of use"
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jpara
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« Reply #32 on: December 14, 2006, 04:42:54 PM »
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I would think given it is a pigment ink like Epson the opened shelf life would be close to the same.  

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I asked this very question of Canon support.  They had no information, and weren't even able to give me the shelf life unopened figure quoted in this thread.

--John
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martinmitch
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« Reply #33 on: December 15, 2006, 03:35:39 AM »
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I would think given it is a pigment ink like Epson the opened shelf life would be close to the same.
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Hello,

Please,could you be sensible and use verifiable facts,your statement is misleading because we are dealing with Canon inks NOT Epson.
Let us surmise this point of ink longevity.
The shelf life is 18 months and it's a prussurised sealed ink feed system on the iPF5000  and ink is agitated before going through printheads so one might guess that usability of the ink is 18 months.
Also,if one purchases a larger printer than previous surely human inclination is to make more use of it and to show how it works to friends.Only buy best equipment on the market at time of purchase is the advice given by individuals with more experiance in printing and computer game.Life is to short for regrets.

Martin Mitchell
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Tony B.
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« Reply #34 on: December 22, 2006, 09:38:23 PM »
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Ok, for anyone not reading the Canon IPF5000 wiki.

I decided to purchase the IPF5000, I ordered it on a Monday and it arrived two days later on Wednesday.  Not to bad right before Christmas.

Anyways, I decided to start setting it up that night.  I installed the printheads, then the ink cartridges, then the paper cassette with paper in it so it would run the printhead alignment.  In the process of the printhead alignment I received a right side print head error.  Following the manual it recommended to remove and reinstall the printhead.  So I did that, that dropped the ink for the right side printhead down to 20% (left side at 60%).

Well, that did not fix the issue so I had to wait until Thursday morning to call Canon.  After talking with Canon with my concern the said they would send me out a new printhead.  I also asked if they would cover the ink loss during replacement and the csr said they would check into it.

When arriving home on Friday night my printhead was here.  Opened the box to the relief of a printhead and the needed ink cartridges for that printhead.

So back at the printer I start installing the new printhead.  The printer does whatever it does to clean the printhead of ink.  Says to replace printhead and I open it up and replace the printhead.  

It then starts to purge the printhead with ink and now it gives me a Full maintenance cartridge error.  Oh well, will have to wait another day to finish setting it up.  Hopefully I will be able to print this weekend.

Those maintenance cartridges sure do not last long.  Even though it went through the initial charge of ink and two printhead replacement processes.  Not sure how much ink all that used but I would suspect that once I replace the maintenance cartridge it will ask me to replace all the ink cartridges for that printhead.  Only time will tell.

I did load all the software and drivers in the meantime.  I will also pick up some paper 13x19, 17x22 and maybe a roll of something when I go get the maintenance cartridge.

Tony B.
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David White
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« Reply #35 on: December 22, 2006, 10:47:05 PM »
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It then starts to purge the printhead with ink and now it gives me a Full maintenance cartridge error.  Oh well, will have to wait another day to finish setting it up.  Hopefully I will be able to print this weekend.

Those maintenance cartridges sure do not last long.  Even though it went through the initial charge of ink and two printhead replacement processes.  Not sure how much ink all that used but I would suspect that once I replace the maintenance cartridge it will ask me to replace all the ink cartridges for that printhead.  Only time will tell.
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The activities you are going through are with the print head replacements are probably responsible for filling the maintenance cartridge.  I've been through the starter ink set and am well into a full set of cartridges and my maintenace cartridge is at 40%.
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David White
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