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Author Topic: NAS RAID  (Read 3156 times)
Sami Kulju
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« on: December 13, 2006, 07:09:06 AM »
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Hi!

Im simply running out of time in my life...

To help me save a little bit of time for normal life, I have been thinking switching to NAS-RAID in our studios data storage. RAID 5 sounds like safe and NAS helps to share the files between multiple working stations.

My question is: does anyone here have any user experience from 2-4 GB NAS-products? Any known issues? Good brands?

So far I have found two manufacturers: Buffalo and Cube Station (product: CS-406e)

Our studio is 100% Mac  from 10.3. to 10.4 and gigabit ethernet.

This NAS-solution is mainly going to be a storage for open projects and secondly, if it works nice it might serve as archieve too.

I would be happy to hear comments.

sami
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Sami Kulju / Helsinki - Finland
www.studiosamikulju.fi
BernardLanguillier
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« Reply #1 on: December 13, 2006, 08:02:36 AM »
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You might want to check recent threads on the subject in the Digital Image Processing section of the forum.

Cheers,
Bernard
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A few images online here!
pss
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« Reply #2 on: December 13, 2006, 12:38:01 PM »
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infrant readynas....fastest and most features....works perfectly with mac (or PC)....highly recommended....has won all speed tests against buffalo (google it)
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Sami Kulju
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« Reply #3 on: December 13, 2006, 12:54:25 PM »
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Thank You!

sami

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infrant readynas....fastest and most features....works perfectly with mac (or PC)....highly recommended....has won all speed tests against buffalo (google it)
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=90305\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
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Sami Kulju / Helsinki - Finland
www.studiosamikulju.fi
Dustbak
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« Reply #4 on: December 13, 2006, 01:17:43 PM »
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I use an Infrant. This one is quite good. Biggest problem with these things is read/write (especially write) speed.

I have tried multiple solutions and most were really dissappointing. Yes, you can have 100m/bit network access however with most the write speed is lacking causing you to never get to the full 100mbit of network speed (let alone 1Gbit of network speed ).

Whatever you buy make sure you can return it when you find out that write speed is causing you problems. Ask specifically to your vendor whether he can guarantuee that your item can perform.

You also want something that can do at least RAID5 (preferably with a hotspare and some extra drives).
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pss
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« Reply #5 on: December 13, 2006, 02:22:46 PM »
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gigabit is way faster then 100ethernet....still not as fast as FW but faster then USB1...i have a macbookpro and transfer reasonably fast...the best thing about the infant is the autoexpanding volume, so you can add drives as you grow, without having to re-format, re-save,.... also they work great as servers...ready michaels article on the infrant...
i also have a FW800 raid5 box, which is of course faster, but for storage i would get another infrant before anything else...they are simply way more versatile and the speed is acceptable...i think the new NV boxes are even faster...i have an x-raid...
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Dustbak
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« Reply #6 on: December 13, 2006, 03:42:25 PM »
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gigabit is way faster then 100ethernet....still not as fast as FW but faster then USB1...i have a macbookpro and transfer reasonably fast...the best thing about the infant is the autoexpanding volume, so you can add drives as you grow, without having to re-format, re-save,.... also they work great as servers...ready michaels article on the infrant...
i also have a FW800 raid5 box, which is of course faster, but for storage i would get another infrant before anything else...they are simply way more versatile and the speed is acceptable...i think the new NV boxes are even faster...i have an x-raid...
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=90331\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]


You are not getting my point. There are many NAS devices that have Gigabit network connections however have terrible read/write speed. There are devices that have just 100 Megabit network speed but are faster than the Gigabit devices because the machine has a way better read/write speed

There are few devices where the read/write speed is determined by the limit of the network speed.

The Infrant works very good.
« Last Edit: December 13, 2006, 03:43:10 PM by Dustbak » Logged
Mark Graf
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« Reply #7 on: December 13, 2006, 03:48:12 PM »
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With the proper networking setup (gigabit + JumboFrames enabled), you will be able to get pretty close to USB2 speeds to an external hard drive with a Infrant ReadyNAS. (appx. 23 MB/s transfer speeds).  I own both a Buffalo Terastation and a ReadyNAS NV+, and the Infrant definitely has an edge on speed.   They also have a very active support forum, which helps a lot in optimizing the NAS for the best performance.
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David White
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« Reply #8 on: December 13, 2006, 03:52:39 PM »
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I second, third, and fourth the Infrant ReadyNAS.  Perhaps the person with the bad experience had an older version or other problems.  The speed with the new versions is just as good as I see with equipment costing thousands of dollars more.
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David White
nicolaasdb
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« Reply #9 on: December 13, 2006, 10:24:13 PM »
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I daisy wired 6 2TB lacie drives (firewire 800...superfast..like working from your HD)......3 workdrives and 3 backups.....and keep on adding...I know it is not the way it is supposed to be done....but it works for me. And it is relatively cheap at 1000 bucks per drive, comes down to about $2 per GB stored (1GB work/1GB backup). I shoot about 40-60GB per job (about 40jobs per 2TB+2TB backup)

Backing up to CD/DVD is just taking to much time, network drives are to slow unless you are forking out 20K or more.
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