Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: 3800/5000 B&W  (Read 2870 times)
sralser
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 38


« on: December 17, 2006, 12:32:17 PM »
ReplyReply

I just got some sample prints form inkjetart.  To my eyes the B&W from the 3800 appears to have a sligth greenish tint, whereas the 5000 looks more neutral.  Anyone have any comments on this?  I'm still trying to decide.

thanks

Steve
Logged
NikosR
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 622


WWW
« Reply #1 on: December 17, 2006, 12:51:43 PM »
ReplyReply

Honestly, I believe that ordering sample prints is not the way to decide between the two printers.

The two printer's output is too close, and there are too many variables to influence the look of any limited sample of printouts produced by a third party, for this to be of any help.

BTW, I get very neutral BW from the 3800, both through Advanced BW and RGB printing. People have been getting neutral BW from K3 inks for quite a long time now for this to be an issue.

Myself, being a conservative sort of person when it comes to these things, I would not yet invest on a Canon or HP pigment printer, until there is a bit more collective experience out there from people much more skilled to judge things than me. But then, that's just me.
Logged

Nikos
jjlphoto
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 467


« Reply #2 on: December 17, 2006, 01:02:10 PM »
ReplyReply

I posted the following on the thread below "Just finished installing my 3800!"

I just primted some B&W portraits (straight grayscale, but as AdobeRGB files, with no PS toning) on Innove FibaPrint F-Type Brilliant white. Amazing! Dead-on neutral gray, great d-max. I also showed it to an old B&W darkroom guy. He was amazed as well!

That print was made using a profile I made with the GMB i1 Pro with match v3.6.1 software using the TC9.18 RGB targets, and I used Epson Premium Lustre Photo Paper as the media setting.
Logged

Thanks, John Luke

Member-ASMP
michael
Administrator
Sr. Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4857



« Reply #3 on: December 17, 2006, 05:21:02 PM »
ReplyReply

I've been printing with the 3800 for the past few days on Epson as well as other papers, with their supplied profiles as well as profiles which I made myself, and results are excellent in both B&W and colour.

My review will be online on Wednesday.

Michael
Logged
jjlphoto
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 467


« Reply #4 on: December 17, 2006, 09:48:27 PM »
ReplyReply

The Epson 5000 is a legacy printer, and uses a 6 color dye inkset if I recall correctly. I don't see how that can compare to the K3 pigment inkset. The 3800 has 3 blacks running, photo black (or matte black), light black, and light/light black. There is simply no color shift, and metamerism is a thing of the past as well.
Logged

Thanks, John Luke

Member-ASMP
cariarer
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 20


« Reply #5 on: December 18, 2006, 12:24:34 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote
The Epson 5000 is a legacy printer...

I think he is probably talking about the Canon IPF5000, not the Epson  

Regards, Marco...
Logged
Eric Myrvaagnes
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 7950



WWW
« Reply #6 on: December 18, 2006, 08:27:59 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote
I think he is probably talking about the Canon IPF5000, not the Epson   

Regards, Marco...
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=91101\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
Which reminds me: many years ago most classical musicians used to say "The Fifth" when referring to Beethoven's fifth symphony. But one friend of mine was a fan of Mahler, and for hime "The Fifth" always meant Mahler's fifth symphony.

Of course, to many others,  "The Fifth" refers to the national brew of Scotland.  
Logged

-Eric Myrvaagnes

http://myrvaagnes.com  Visit my website. New images each season.
John Hollenberg
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 765


« Reply #7 on: December 18, 2006, 12:31:59 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote
Which reminds me: many years ago most classical musicians used to say "The Fifth" when referring to Beethoven's fifth symphony. But one friend of mine was a fan of Mahler, and for hime "The Fifth" always meant Mahler's fifth symphony.

Of course, to many others,  "The Fifth" refers to the national brew of Scotland.   
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=91163\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

I'm going to take "The Fifth" on that question :-)

PS 5th amendment for our non-U.S. colleagues.

--John
Logged
Pages: [1]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad