Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: « 1 [2]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: Questions About The Canon 70-200 F2.8L IS Lens  (Read 8986 times)
SCOR
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 3


WWW
« Reply #20 on: January 07, 2007, 05:11:07 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote
All of the 70-200 IS lenses have "second generation" IS. And "tripod mode" is NOT the same as an "off switch". When on a tripod, the IS mechanism will still activate (you can hear the whirring sound) and vibrations transmitted through the tripod, such as from wind gusts or the camera being bumped, are significantly reduced. There is a definite benefit to leaving IS on, even when mounted to a tripod. You can easily see the difference through the viewfinder, and the difference is also apparent in the images.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=94300\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

If the tripod is not sufficiently stable, obviously IS will be a benefit.  However, if the tripod is stable enough for the lens to go into "tripod mode" then the IS shuts off.  On teh 70-200, "tripod mode" = automatic shitoff.

This is different than the IS in the super telephotos (300, 400, 500, 600)where "tripod mode" means that minor vibrations from mirror slap are reduced by IS even when the lens is on a stable platform.  This is not the case with the 70-200.

I was under the same impression so I emailed Chuck Westfall, who is a Canon spokesperson, and he sent me the above content in an email explaining the various incarnations of IS.
« Last Edit: January 07, 2007, 06:29:49 PM by SCOR » Logged

budjames
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 690


WWW
« Reply #21 on: January 07, 2007, 05:42:57 PM »
ReplyReply

I have the Canon 70-200 f2.8 IS and the 100-400 f4.5/5.6 IS.

The 70-200 is about the sharpest medium zoom that I have owned. The images are tack sharp and the IS works fairly well. I turn off the IS when on a tripod (Manfrotto Carbon One or Gitzo Explorer Carbon).

The 70-200 is noticably sharper than the 100-400 in the same zoom range. I prefer to use the 70-200 with a Canon 1.4x teleconverter than the 100-400, assuming the range works for the subject.

My 2 cents.

Bud James
North Wales, PA
Logged

Bud James
North Wales, PA
www.budjamesphotography.com
Jonathan Wienke
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5759



WWW
« Reply #22 on: January 08, 2007, 06:00:16 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote
If the tripod is not sufficiently stable, obviously IS will be a benefit.  However, if the tripod is stable enough for the lens to go into "tripod mode" then the IS shuts off.  On teh 70-200, "tripod mode" = automatic shitoff.

That's interesting, as I've shot over 20,000 frames with my 70-200 IS, most on a tripod with IS on, and have never had the IS not activate when it was switched on, even when using a cable release on a calm day with a very sturdy tripod.
Logged

Ben Rubinstein
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1733


« Reply #23 on: January 09, 2007, 03:33:09 PM »
ReplyReply

According to Chuck Westfall somewhere that I don't recall the IS on tripod needs a second half press on the shutter release so that the lens can 'realise' that there is little enough vibration to switch to tripod mode i.e. not get confused and still operate but possibly with finer corrections. Can't remember where, probably on the CPS Europe FAQ site.

I will say that the contrast of my 70-200 f4L IS with IS swtiched off on tripod is noticeably crisper that with it switched on. I was slightly disappointed that the contrast didn't look as 'L' as with the non IS version that I owned but with the IS turned off it is actually better and dare I say sharper? This is of course comparing tripod to tripod with correct technique. Handheld the IS will beat non IS period!
« Last Edit: January 09, 2007, 03:34:45 PM by pom » Logged

Pages: « 1 [2]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad