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Author Topic: Eizo CE 240w Color Navigator Problems  (Read 34156 times)
jackbingham
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« Reply #60 on: January 19, 2007, 07:51:15 PM »
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Frank, I have dealt with hundreds of Eizos and have never seen this. But I have a suggestion. You need to try this monitor on a different computer. Go to an Apple store and enlist a genius or take the monitor to a friends house. I'm betting on the computer here. Since we have never even heard a wisper of this problem and you seem to have gotten 2 monitors with the same problem I'm suspicious of the computer.
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Jack Bingham
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frankiegee
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« Reply #61 on: January 19, 2007, 08:27:01 PM »
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Jack,
Thank you again for your input. I also was thinking the same thing but I just discovered Eizo had sent me a 'factory recertified' monitor when I was assured of getting a new replacement. I spoke to a manager at Eizo Corporate Headquarters and he was adamant that I should have received a new monitor and is getting back to me on Monday. Of course, this doesn't rule out the computer being the problem and I am seriously considering your suggestion as my only alternative if this doesn't resolve the issue (which I'm not counting on). Thanks again Jack for taking the time to help me. I sincerely appreciate this.
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eronald
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« Reply #62 on: January 20, 2007, 07:21:12 PM »
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Frank, have you tried my suggested workaround of connecting the monitor via a DVI/VGA adapter plug and the VGA cable supplied and caibrating it like an analogue monitor ? It's not pretty but it should work ...

Edmund

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Jack,
Thank you again for your input. I also was thinking the same thing but I just discovered Eizo had sent me a 'factory recertified' monitor when I was assured of getting a new replacement. I spoke to a manager at Eizo Corporate Headquarters and he was adamant that I should have received a new monitor and is getting back to me on Monday. Of course, this doesn't rule out the computer being the problem and I am seriously considering your suggestion as my only alternative if this doesn't resolve the issue (which I'm not counting on). Thanks again Jack for taking the time to help me. I sincerely appreciate this.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=96680\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
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Edmund Ronald, Ph.D. 
jackbingham
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« Reply #63 on: January 21, 2007, 10:49:47 AM »
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Edmund, why buy this expensive monitor and not take advantage of the hardware controls? They will do a much better job then trying to do this manually
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Jack Bingham
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eronald
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« Reply #64 on: January 22, 2007, 08:18:06 AM »
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Edmund, why buy this expensive monitor and not take advantage of the hardware controls? They will do a much better job then trying to do this manually
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=96837\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]


Jack,

If I had a *new* Eizo CG-series monitor  land on my desk, I would just switch it to the sRGB preset, not bother to recalibrate and get on with my life. The Eizo people told me that the CG series is perfectly calibrated initially, indeed a graph is in the box with a certificate, and this will only drift due to backlight aging.

Whether this is true in practice I don't know - however, the art of color management is really one of managing expectations. When the user really wants perfection it becomes hell  - calibrating my own monitors took me one month last year, and I'm now working again on a badly calibrated system because I reinstalled the OS. Interestingly  I've already had a first calibration failure with an obsolete unnamed first-rank product made at the time by a big US-based company, that worked decently a year ago but which I never tested on my big screens. Maybe it's the colorimeter (which has been bundled with the excellent ColorEyes in its day) , maybe it's the software, who knows ?

And if you think I'm being cynical, ask yourselves why no monitor maker ever bundles calibrators in EVERY box. I don't think it's money - I think it's because there would be a HUGE number of calibration failures (due to cards, operating systems, bad monitor tolerances, user error) and it would be unmanageable. The way it runs now is that the user never notices how bad her color really is because every monitor in her office shows a different color.

Edmund
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Edmund Ronald, Ph.D. 
eronald
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« Reply #65 on: January 22, 2007, 08:36:16 AM »
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Edmund, why buy this expensive monitor and not take advantage of the hardware controls? They will do a much better job then trying to do this manually
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=96837\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]


Jack,

If I had a *new* Eizo CG-series monitor  land on my desk, I would just switch it to the sRGB preset, not bother to recalibrate and get on with my life. The Eizo people told me that the CG series is perfectly calibrated initially, indeed a graph is in the box with a certificate, and this will only drift due to backlight aging.

Whether this is true in practice I don't know - however, the art of color management is really one of managing expectations. When the user really wants perfection it becomes hell  - calibrating my own monitors took me one month last year, and I'm now working again on a badly calibrated system because I reinstalled the OS. Interestingly  I've already had a first calibration failure with an obsolete unnamed first-rank product made at the time by a big US-based company, that worked decently a year ago but which I never tested on my big screens. Maybe it's the colorimeter (which has been bundled with the excellent ColorEyes in its day) , maybe it's the software, who knows ?

And if you think I'm being cynical, ask yourselves why no monitor maker ever bundles calibrators in EVERY box. I don't think it's money - I think it's because there would be a HUGE number of calibration failures (due to cards, operating systems, bad monitor tolerances, user error) and it would be unmanageable. The way it runs now is that the user never notices how bad her color really is because every monitor in her office shows a different color.

Edmund
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Edmund Ronald, Ph.D. 
jjlphoto
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« Reply #66 on: January 22, 2007, 08:56:35 AM »
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If I had a *new* Eizo CG-series monitor  land on my desk, I would just switch it to the sRGB preset, not bother to recalibrate and get on with my life. The Eizo people told me that the CG series is perfectly calibrated initially, indeed a graph is in the box with a certificate, and this will only drift due to backlight aging.
Edmund
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I have a an Eizo CG21, the factory installed profile may indeed be this perfectly verfied certificate thing, but the luminosity is way to bright for any practical use. I use my GMB i1 Pro with Eizo ColorNavigator to run it at 130 over all luminosity with a black level set to 47. This jives perfectly with matchprints made at prepress houses, and with my 3800 inkjet prints made with custom profiles.

I run my Cal/Profile with ColorNavigator with the monitor set to "CAL" mode by pressing the left arrow on the panel. The "CAL" icon appears on the lower left corner on my model. Has anyone checked this function yet?
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eronald
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« Reply #67 on: January 22, 2007, 02:15:01 PM »
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I have a an Eizo CG21, the factory installed profile may indeed be this perfectly verfied certificate thing, but the luminosity is way to bright for any practical use. I use my GMB i1 Pro with Eizo ColorNavigator to run it at 130 over all luminosity with a black level set to 47. This jives perfectly with matchprints made at prepress houses, and with my 3800 inkjet prints made with custom profiles.

I run my Cal/Profile with ColorNavigator with the monitor set to "CAL" mode by pressing the left arrow on the panel. The "CAL" icon appears on the lower left corner on my model. Has anyone checked this function yet?
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=96981\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]


I think when you run it on "cal" it uses the table written into it by the color navigator or similar software, and profiling is done by rewriting the internal LUTs. In the sRGB mode it is locked into factory-calibration, and if necessary you calibrate it by computing a software profile (no internal LUTs). There is also a custom mode which is adjustable directly by the user via sliders.

Or maybe it's the other way round ?

Edmund
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Edmund Ronald, Ph.D. 
jjlphoto
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« Reply #68 on: January 22, 2007, 02:40:54 PM »
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I was just wondering if it was not set to CAL, perhaps that is why the monitor is not seen by Color Navigator.
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jackbingham
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« Reply #69 on: January 22, 2007, 05:51:54 PM »
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Quote from: eronald,Jan 22 2007, 02:36 PM
Jack,

"If I had a *new* Eizo CG-series monitor  land on my desk, I would just switch it to the sRGB preset, not bother to recalibrate and get on with my life. The Eizo people told me that the CG series is perfectly calibrated initially, indeed a graph is in the box with a certificate, and this will only drift due to backlight aging."

Ok this is getting silly now. One look at the monitor luts created while calibrating and profiling an Eizo provides a clear indication that this is not the case. If they were perfectly calibrated you would see one solid line not 3 r, g and b that spread apart in various places from black to white.
And furthermore if this was the case why would they even bother to build a system to do user made hardware calibrations and make software to do it. If you can't make a great profile with an eizo you either have crumby software or you're fooling around with stuff you should just let work. It's that good and has been for some time now.


"And if you think I'm being cynical, ask yourselves why no monitor maker ever bundles calibrators in EVERY box. I don't think it's money - I think it's because there would be a HUGE number of calibration failures"

Monitor makers don't bundle instruments because they don't want to be in the color management business. If they are smart they would rather not choose one sensor over another for political/financial reasons. The message that should go out to the readers of these forum and for that matter all others is that calibrating and profiling your monitors is an absolute necessity. It is very doable, repeatable and not really very expensive. To suggest that it works as bad as you say only makes me wonder what you're doing wrong, and so should everyone else. But then, I'm just a sales guy.

Jack
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Jack Bingham
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eronald
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« Reply #70 on: January 23, 2007, 02:29:15 PM »
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Jack,
 We do agree that monitor calibration *should* be doable and repeatable and not expensive.
 We also agree that Coloreyes is an excellent calibration product with superb support.
 About the state of the monitor industry we seem to agree to disagree, but I still think you're a very nice guy


Edmund

Quote
Monitor makers don't bundle instruments because they don't want to be in the color management business. If they are smart they would rather not choose one sensor over another for political/financial reasons. The message that should go out to the readers of these forum and for that matter all others is that calibrating and profiling your monitors is an absolute necessity. It is very doable, repeatable and not really very expensive. To suggest that it works as bad as you say only makes me wonder what you're doing wrong, and so should everyone else. But then, I'm just a sales guy.

Jack
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Edmund Ronald, Ph.D. 
ansel
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« Reply #71 on: February 23, 2007, 08:24:31 PM »
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I had the same trouble with my ce240w.  Who could have imagined the heavyweight Eizo suppied USB cable would develop a problem, but it did. My faith in such a cable keep me up way too late a few nights with way too many restarts.
Changed the cable and all the lights came on.
Good luck
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craigfraser
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« Reply #72 on: February 26, 2007, 09:57:42 AM »
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Hi Frank

To cheer you up, I have the Eizo CG21 and have the same problem you have, I have had to use the Xrites own software, which works fine but would of preferred to use the Color Navigator.  If I ever get it sorted I will let you know asap

Regards

Craig
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frankiegee
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« Reply #73 on: February 26, 2007, 12:26:34 PM »
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Ansel and Craig:
Thank you for offering support; I figured out what was wrong and had posted a new thread regarding the solution for my Eizo and the Powermac G5. It was the graphics card. I had tried it with a new Radeon 9600 Pro for PC/Mac (256 MB) and it didn't work. Eizo's website said the Radeon 9600 Pro would support the monitor but this card didn't. I tried it with the original card shipped with the G5, the Radeon 9600 Pro (64 MB) and it worked fine. This was solved by the process of elimination and having the fortune of still having the original graphics card. Thanks and hope this helps.
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EdwardSutorik
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« Reply #74 on: January 23, 2010, 04:50:46 PM »
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I had the same problem as reported by the Original Poster (except that I've got a CG241W).  I changed and checked all the various cables.  I called Eizo USA and talked to their chief engineer.  Twice.  Totally useless.  I bought a new sensor 'cause he said that my first one wouldn't work (wrong, pal).  And I read through all four pages of this topic.  And got stressed.

Nuthin', nuthin', nuthin'......

Then as I was playing with things again, it all started working and continues to work.  

My problem was that I plugged in the USB cable 180 degrees out of phase at the monitor.  I thought that was supposed to be physically impossible.  Not on this monitor.  And maybe not on other models.

That simple.  For me.  And hopefully for you.



Edward Sutorik

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