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Author Topic: More river scenes  (Read 3377 times)
OnyimBob
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« on: January 07, 2007, 07:14:47 AM »
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A couple more scenes on the river at my place. Crits please.

The first is almost a repeat of my earlier post but with different light and mood ..

[attachment=1485:attachment]

the second .. same light & mood ... different scene.

[attachment=1486:attachment]

Bob.
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jdemott
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« Reply #1 on: January 07, 2007, 11:25:16 AM »
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Hello Bob,

I favor the second one of these two.  The light in these is much more subdued than the earlier ones (heavier smoke?).  As a result much of the scene in the panoramic version feels too dark on the sides.  Also, the top feels a bit cramped.  The second one solves those problems, eliminating the dark sides and opening up the top so the composition feels very natural.
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John DeMott
wolfnowl
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« Reply #2 on: January 08, 2007, 02:31:01 AM »
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Actually both of these remind me of something out of an Elizabethan era painting.  Not sure if that was what you were going for, but nice work!

Mike.
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If your mind is attuned to beauty, you find beauty in everything.
~ Jean Cooke ~


My Flickr site / Random Thoughts and Other Meanderings at M&M's Musings
OnyimBob
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« Reply #3 on: January 12, 2007, 01:13:43 AM »
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Today the fires burned through here. These river scenes are no longer, all burnt.
Thankfully, our buildings and garden are untouched but all the bush is burnt.
I'll post some pics of the " scenery" when I have a moment.
Bob.
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Lisa Nikodym
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« Reply #4 on: January 12, 2007, 10:31:36 AM »
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I'm very sorry your wonderful river scenes are burnt.  I imagine you'll really miss them (I would).  But thankful that your house was spared!

The first picture is pretty, but I still like the lighting considerably better in the one in your previous posting.  I don't care for the second one here; too much gray "dead space" in the middle that draws the eye but doesn't give it anything good to look at.  (At least that's my humble opinion, for what it's worth...)

Keep the one from your previous posting!  I was really impressed by that one.

Ciao -
Lisa
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wolfnowl
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« Reply #5 on: January 12, 2007, 03:11:39 PM »
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About 10 or 11 years ago a friend and I designed a slide show presentation for Parks Canada, Western Canada Parks on the ecology of wildfire.  Fire is an essential part of almost all of the world's ecosystems, and while the original impact may appear devestating, within a few months you should be amazed at the changes.  You should have a lot of different greens to photograph!!

Mike.
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If your mind is attuned to beauty, you find beauty in everything.
~ Jean Cooke ~


My Flickr site / Random Thoughts and Other Meanderings at M&M's Musings
OnyimBob
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« Reply #6 on: January 12, 2007, 11:05:38 PM »
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Quote
About 10 or 11 years ago a friend and I designed a slide show presentation for Parks Canada, Western Canada Parks on the ecology of wildfire.  Fire is an essential part of almost all of the world's ecosystems, and while the original impact may appear devestating, within a few months you should be amazed at the changes.  You should have a lot of different greens to photograph!!

Mike.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=95326\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
You're quite right of course Mike, our Victoria (the state in Australia, not the city in BC) is known as the bush fire capital of the world and so, generally, country people are very aware and reasonably educated about the risks and results of bush fires; though probably fewer are aware of the part fire plays in our ecosystem. In 2003 we had an even larger area than these fires burn in our alpine region (puny compared to the Rockies) and an awful lot was learned studying the burnt areas about the ecology of bush fires.
Now a confession, this morning I was able to get down and have a closer look at the river. The actual stream bed didn't burn (sounds funny but because of drought the river is not actually flowing, just pools), and, in fact, standing in the spot where I took the photographs, it's not easy to see that a fire has passed through - mostly.
The river flows in a deep channel 30 feet deep and 50-60 yards wide. The sides of that channel have been incinerated with only the large fully grown trees remaining - literally scorched charred earth.
So, good and bad, and we're still here to observe, enjoy and anticipate the changes you mention. Exciting times without the adrenalin rush that kept us going for a couple of weeks now.
Cheers, and thanks too to Lisa.
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trigeek
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« Reply #7 on: January 14, 2007, 04:47:03 PM »
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I love the vertical shot... looks like a painting... Sorry that to get such a beautiful shot, you had to loose the trees in the fire.
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