Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1] 2 »   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: Sandisk Extreme III Compact Flash Card  (Read 11777 times)
Killer Angel
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 45


« on: January 07, 2007, 07:19:37 AM »
ReplyReply

I am thinking of getting a Sandisk Extreme III compact flash card for my Canon 30D camera.Has anybody out there ever had had any experiences with this compact flash card?If yes,what do you think about it?Would you highly recommend it?
THANKS.

Killer Angel
Logged
Chris_Brown
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 731



WWW
« Reply #1 on: January 07, 2007, 08:29:28 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote
I am thinking of getting a Sandisk Extreme III compact flash card for my Canon 30D camera.Has anybody out there ever had had any experiences with this compact flash card?If yes,what do you think about it?Would you highly recommend it?[{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
I've tried Lexar, Viking and [a href=\"http://sandisk.com/Corporate/About/]SanDisk.[/url] I've used these cards in Olympus and Canon cameras and none of them have failed, but like any flash memory device, after a certain number of read/write cycles they do eventually fail.

According to SanDisk, the Extreme series is designed for rugged use in adverse conditions. Although I'd never dunk one in boiling water to find out, I've used my Extreme CF cards in every kind of condition that my cameras can handle. So far, so good.

Another area for you to research is the Galbraith CF/SD database. Here you will find an excellent resource on the strengths and weaknesses of various CF brands.
Logged

~ CB
feppe
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2907

Oh this shows up in here!


WWW
« Reply #2 on: January 07, 2007, 09:16:39 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote
I've tried Lexar, Viking and SanDisk. I've used these cards in Olympus and Canon cameras and none of them have failed, but like any flash memory device, after a certain number of read/write cycles they do eventually fail.

I bought a Lexar 2GB card with my 30D, shot it full of pictures in Virginia and Washington D.C. A few days later I tried accessing it and the card was toast. After first use. Data recovery service recovered only 20 or so shots. Needless to say I'm never going to use anything Lexar ever again.
Logged

mtselman
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 29


WWW
« Reply #3 on: January 07, 2007, 09:26:10 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote
I am thinking of getting a Sandisk Extreme III compact flash card for my Canon 30D camera.Has anybody out there ever had had any experiences with this compact flash card?If yes,what do you think about it?Would you highly recommend it?
THANKS.

Killer Angel
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=94290\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
Have been using SanDisk Ultra II, 2GB  for over a year now in Canon 350D. It survived cold and dry at 6000m in Nepal, humid and hot in Laos and Thailand, worked in "el-cheapo" card-readers in internet cafes around the world and is still going fine.
Paid almost $200 for it back than. Just picked up another one for a meager $40.

The "Extreme" version should only be better.

  --Misha
Logged
Paul Sumi
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1216


« Reply #4 on: January 07, 2007, 05:11:12 PM »
ReplyReply

I've got Sandisk Extreme III (2 gig) CF cards along with an assortment of older Lexar cards.  No problems with any of them.  

Paul
Logged

francois
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6461


« Reply #5 on: January 08, 2007, 03:46:02 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote
I am thinking of getting a Sandisk Extreme III compact flash card for my Canon 30D camera.Has anybody out there ever had had any experiences with this compact flash card?If yes,what do you think about it?Would you highly recommend it?
THANKS.

Killer Angel
[{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
If you're quick enough, you might even get a Capture One LE free license with your Extreme 3 memory card. I'm not sure if the promo is still valid.
See [a href=\"http://www.phaseone.com/Global/Campaigns/SanDisk%20info.aspx]this link[/url].
Logged

Francois
GregW
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 305


WWW
« Reply #6 on: January 08, 2007, 05:01:15 AM »
ReplyReply

This my card of choice these days.  I currently using an 8GB, 4GB and 2 2GB.  Like other here I have used them in a range of conditions including a lot in cold alpine weather at high altitude.  The only conditions I have not used them in is high humidity tropical conditions, simply because I haven't had the opportunity.

Since the introduction of the IV cards the III's have come down in price (Switzerland) nicely and imo represent excellent value for money.  The advice to look at Rob Galbraith's (Card database)  is good.  Many camera bodys' will not be able utilise the extra speed in the IV cards.  So if you are happy to wait a little longer in post you can get a larger III or simply save some cash.
Logged
matt4626
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 187


« Reply #7 on: January 08, 2007, 02:00:15 PM »
ReplyReply

Extreme III's have worked great for me. Everything from sub-zero to Africa.
Logged
aaykay
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 359


« Reply #8 on: January 11, 2007, 04:48:22 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote
I am thinking of getting a Sandisk Extreme III compact flash card for my Canon 30D camera.Has anybody out there ever had had any experiences with this compact flash card?If yes,what do you think about it?Would you highly recommend it?
THANKS.

Killer Angel
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=94290\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

I have a couple of Extreme III CF cards and they have never failed me.  I just bought an 8GB Extreme IV but am yet to receive it from B&H.
Logged
kaelaria
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2184



WWW
« Reply #9 on: January 11, 2007, 08:18:02 PM »
ReplyReply

If you need it for the extreme temp ranges that's one thing, but if you just need good performance, anything more than the Ultra II is a waste of money, the camera isn't fast enough to take advantage of faster cards.
Logged

Paul Sumi
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1216


« Reply #10 on: January 11, 2007, 10:16:01 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote
If you need it for the extreme temp ranges that's one thing, but if you just need good performance, anything more than the Ultra II is a waste of money, the camera isn't fast enough to take advantage of faster cards.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=95204\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

There's also download speed to be considered.  With the appropriate card reader you'll spend significantly less time sending the files to your computer.

Paul
Logged

kaelaria
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2184



WWW
« Reply #11 on: January 12, 2007, 07:09:38 AM »
ReplyReply

That's true, you can save a minute or so dumping a full card.

Personally it wasn't worth $80 more for me to save it, but if I was dumping full cards on a regular basis it may have been.
Logged

Raw shooter
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 205


« Reply #12 on: January 12, 2007, 07:36:10 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote
I bought a Lexar 2GB card with my 30D, shot it full of pictures in Virginia and Washington D.C. A few days later I tried accessing it and the card was toast. After first use. Data recovery service recovered only 20 or so shots. Needless to say I'm never going to use anything Lexar ever again.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=94310\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Same exact problem with Lexar.  I was a loyal Lexar user - but the failure of 2 of their cards ended that loyalty.
The Sandisk Extreme III cards have been totally reliable.  I would recommend Sandisk as well.
Logged
aaykay
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 359


« Reply #13 on: January 12, 2007, 09:09:11 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote
If you need it for the extreme temp ranges that's one thing, but if you just need good performance, anything more than the Ultra II is a waste of money, the camera isn't fast enough to take advantage of faster cards.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=95204\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

That is a good point.  The cameras **currently in the market**, are not optimized to take advantage of the speed of any of these cards.  In fact, Rob Galbraith's site had some detailed objective tests taken with several of these cards, mated to several high-end dSLRs and it showed that the high speeds of these cards are never used.

But, it does not mean that the cameras currently in the pipeline, would remain the same.  Why would companies maintain the status quo, if they can speed up the file-write-to-card process (enabling either a smaller/cheaper buffer or extending the number of files that can be written to the existing buffer) and claim a competitive advantage in the marketplace ?  

Methinks, with Extreme IVs with 40MB/S  *Read AND Write* speeds available, it is only a matter of a year or so before cameras that can take advantage of that speed, will hit the market.  Memory manufacturers like Sandisk, work hand-in-hand with camera manufacturers and if they come out with such a high-speed product, the writing on the wall is that cameras that can take advantage of the speed, are definitely in the pipeline.
Logged
kaelaria
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2184



WWW
« Reply #14 on: January 12, 2007, 09:20:11 AM »
ReplyReply

Yeah, and by the time we all upgrade to the faster cameras, there will #1 be faster and larger cards out, and #2 be huge price drops on the current lines.  No point whatsoever in buying technology ahead of the curve that you can't harness.  Total waste of money.

Spend $250 for a card you can't use now, and *maybe* a year+ from now....or wait for that year+ and your next upgrade *if* it will indeed be faster - and pay $120 for the same card.   Hmmmmm
Logged

Paul Sumi
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1216


« Reply #15 on: January 12, 2007, 09:37:24 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote
That's true, you can save a minute or so dumping a full card.

Personally it wasn't worth $80 more for me to save it, but if I was dumping full cards on a regular basis it may have been.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=95252\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

I admittedly was using older CF cards before, but with the Extreme III's I have cut download times nearly in half.

Paul
Logged

Coke
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 14


« Reply #16 on: January 12, 2007, 08:45:22 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote
If you need it for the extreme temp ranges that's one thing, but if you just need good performance, anything more than the Ultra II is a waste of money, the camera isn't fast enough to take advantage of faster cards.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=95204\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]


Very true, the speed gain is only a few hundred kb/s in camera.
The difference in speed shows much more when downloading
the images to your pc. But if you dont have a fast cardreader
it's again not worth to buy extreme cf cards. ultra II is great.
robgalbraith has a cf speed database for different camera
models on his site, only i dont have the link at hand right now.
Logged
aaykay
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 359


« Reply #17 on: January 20, 2007, 09:26:37 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote
Spend $250 for a card you can't use now, and *maybe* a year+ from now....or wait for that year+ and your next upgrade *if* it will indeed be faster - and pay $120 for the same card.   Hmmmmm

Okay, there is one camera that is able to take advantage of the high speed cards.  The Sony Alpha 100.  With Extreme III, it is able to transfer data at over 13-14MB/sec (according to dpreview.com), thus making it currently the speed champion among all the dSLRs, including the high-end Canons.  Obviously, during PMA, they are expected to announce even higher end cameras.

The below link shows a person testing his Extreme III and Extreme IV with the Alpha and finds that with the Extreme III, the buffer fills up after around 9 shots, when shooting RAW.  But when using the Extreme IV, the buffer never fills up when shooting continuously, since the write to the card is fast enough to keep the buffer from ever filling up !  

So, it is spending "$250 for a card you can use NOW" !  No "*maybe a year+ from now"....   Hmmmmmm

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp...essage=21723319
Logged
kaelaria
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2184



WWW
« Reply #18 on: January 20, 2007, 10:39:25 AM »
ReplyReply

We're talking Canon cameras, not Sony.
Logged

aaykay
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 359


« Reply #19 on: January 23, 2007, 01:26:25 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote
We're talking Canon cameras, not Sony.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=96739\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

I think the point is that a dSLR exists right now, which transfers at over 14MB/sec, using the Extreme III card and the performance by the tester above indicates that it is transferring data at well over 30MB/sec when using the Extreme IV card, since with continuous RAW shooting, the camera is creating over 35MB/sec (at 3FPS) and the buffer never fills up.  

That is HUGE and Canon would not be far behind, when they introduce their 1D series shortly.
Logged
Pages: [1] 2 »   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad