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Author Topic: EPSON R1800 OR NEW STYLUS PHOTO 1400 PRINTER?  (Read 8744 times)
SUE H
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« on: January 19, 2007, 07:06:51 AM »
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Hi everybody new to this forum. I have been using a Epson stylus photo 870 printer for  6 years and need to upgrade now. Have been looking at the R1800 but it has been out now quite a while also been looking at the new stylus photo 1400 printer. Not sure which would be best to go for. The 1400 uses claria inks and has 6 cartridges against the R1800 which uses 8 cartridges and is ultra chrome K3 inks.The price of them is about the same anybody help please?
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madmanchan
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« Reply #1 on: January 19, 2007, 08:00:56 AM »
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The main difference is that the 1400 uses dye inks and the 1800 uses pigment inks. With the dye inks you can get deeper blacks and more vivid color saturation, but the inks don't last very long (non-archival). In contrast, the pigment inks last much much longer.

Eric
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SUE H
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« Reply #2 on: January 19, 2007, 08:16:32 AM »
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The main difference is that the 1400 uses dye inks and the 1800 uses pigment inks. With the dye inks you can get deeper blacks and more vivid color saturation, but the inks don't last very long (non-archival). In contrast, the pigment inks last much much longer.

Eric
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thank you Eric, it does say on the features of the new 1400 that the claria photographic ink lasts for up to 200 years so is that not so? The R1800 has 2 more cartidges too so would you say that the actual picture would be of a higher quality printed from the R1800? Sue
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KeithR
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« Reply #3 on: January 19, 2007, 09:07:34 AM »
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...the R1800 which uses 8 cartridges and is ultra chrome K3 inks.The price of them is about the same anybody help please?
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The 1800 does not use the K3 inks. It uses Ultrachorme, but it is the flavor that came before the K3 inkset. Also the 1800 has been out for awhile so the 1400 would be newer technology. Don't know that much about the Claria ink as it is too new on the market. If you want the K3, you have to start with the 2400 or the new 3800 and go from there.
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picnic
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« Reply #4 on: January 19, 2007, 09:44:48 AM »
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The 1800 does not use the K3 inks. It uses Ultrachrome, but it is the flavor that came before the K3 inkset. Also the 1800 has been out for awhile so the 1400 would be newer technology. Don't know that much about the Claria ink as it is too new on the market. If you want the K3, you have to start with the 2400 or the new 3800 and go from there.
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Even beyond that, the 1800 is mainly useful for gloss printing since it has the glop cartridge.  If you don't do mainly gloss, then I would consider the 2400 or 3800 first with the pigment inks.  The K3 inks are a step beyond the Ultrachrome and IMO, pigment would be my choice.  I have a 1280 (dye), 2200 (Ultrachrome) and a 3800 (K3).  The K3 inks/technology handle GD (gloss differential--which is what the 1800 glop cart is meant to take care of) much better--depending upon the paper and profile there's little, bronzing is 'gone' and metamerism (since the 1800 is Ultrachrome, it would have a hefty amount of this altho' I don't know how the addition of a red and blue cart affect this) is also a thing of the past with the K3 inks for all practical purposes.  The K3 inks are also better in color saturation than the older Ultrachrome.  If you print monotones or b/w, be aware that the 1400 is a one black ink only printer---the 2400 is a 3 black ink printer and the K3 inks (plus the ability for the subtle tonality of the extra blacks) do a wonderful job with monos.  The 1800 is also a one black ink only  printer  with switching for the Pk and Mk inks.

I just read the info about the 1400 at inkjetart  (basically its the successor to the 1280) [a href=\"http://inkjetart.com/1400/index.html]http://inkjetart.com/1400/index.html[/url]  which is worthwhile reading.  The projected life of the prints is 98 UNDER GLASS, 200 in albums (dark).  The price is the same as the 1280 is now (not when new which was considerably more) so that's def. in favor of the 1400 at $399.99 which is WAY less than the 2400 at $850.  I suspect one would need to weigh what you will use your printer for, how important the pigment inks are (do you sell your work, for instance) and do a bit of research as to how expensive the Claria inks are vs. the K3 inks for a 13" printer (also consider the media you will use).

On other forums there are a number of people that state that the smaller Claria printers 'drink' ink--I have no knowledge of this, just reporting what I've read a number of times.  Several just stopped using the printers because of this.  

I know if I was buying a new printer to use for a number of years, I would only consider the pigment printers (that's what I did when I wanted to upgrade the 1280) because of what I use my printers for but that's a very personal thing that each person would have to consider.  They are a known quantity and their output is truly beautiful, regardless of the printer's size but I'm sure the 1400 has beautiful color output also.  I would not expect it to be a great b/w printer.

Diane
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SUE H
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« Reply #5 on: January 19, 2007, 10:55:57 AM »
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Even beyond that, the 1800 is mainly useful for gloss printing since it has the glop cartridge.  If you don't do mainly gloss, then I would consider the 2400 or 3800 first with the pigment inks.  The K3 inks are a step beyond the Ultrachrome and IMO, pigment would be my choice.  I have a 1280 (dye), 2200 (Ultrachrome) and a 3800 (K3).  The K3 inks/technology handle GD (gloss differential--which is what the 1800 glop cart is meant to take care of) much better--depending upon the paper and profile there's little, bronzing is 'gone' and metamerism (since the 1800 is Ultrachrome, it would have a hefty amount of this altho' I don't know how the addition of a red and blue cart affect this) is also a thing of the past with the K3 inks for all practical purposes.  The K3 inks are also better in color saturation than the older Ultrachrome.  If you print monotones or b/w, be aware that the 1400 is a one black ink only printer---the 2400 is a 3 black ink printer and the K3 inks (plus the ability for the subtle tonality of the extra blacks) do a wonderful job with monos.  The 1800 is also a one black ink only  printer  with switching for the Pk and Mk inks.

I just read the info about the 1400 at inkjetart  (basically its the successor to the 1280) http://inkjetart.com/1400/index.html  which is worthwhile reading.  The projected life of the prints is 98 UNDER GLASS, 200 in albums (dark).  The price is the same as the 1280 is now (not when new which was considerably more) so that's def. in favor of the 1400 at $399.99 which is WAY less than the 2400 at $850.  I suspect one would need to weigh what you will use your printer for, how important the pigment inks are (do you sell your work, for instance) and do a bit of research as to how expensive the Claria inks are vs. the K3 inks for a 13" printer (also consider the media you will use).

On other forums there are a number of people that state that the smaller Claria printers 'drink' ink--I have no knowledge of this, just reporting what I've read a number of times.  Several just stopped using the printers because of this. 

I know if I was buying a new printer to use for a number of years, I would only consider the pigment printers (that's what I did when I wanted to upgrade the 1280) because of what I use my printers for but that's a very personal thing that each person would have to consider.  They are a known quantity and their output is truly beautiful, regardless of the printer's size but I'm sure the 1400 has beautiful color output also.  I would not expect it to be a great b/w printer.

Diane
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Hi Diane thank you that was very informative. My photography is just a hobby I do not sell my work. Having had  a stylus photo 870 printer for 6 years  and it is actually still going strong I am looking to upgrade to an A3 printer. I have taken on board what you have said. I am wondering if Epson might be bringing a new printer out to take place of the R800/R1800 as they have been out a while now and there is currently quite a price drop on them I can get the R800 for 198 and the R1800 for 318. It would not be financially viable for me togo for the 2400 or above I do mainly gloss work with some matte and a little b and w perhaps I ought to wait a while and see how the 1400 performs as it is still new and not a lot of feedback on them around. Sue
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jbn
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« Reply #6 on: January 19, 2007, 02:44:54 PM »
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I've been using the 1800 for quick prints a lot, and let me tell you, it is a an ink HOG.  If you do more than a few prints at a time, then by all means, go for something with bigger cartridges.  Also, you'd be amazed how often you'll have to buy the GLOP cartridges when all you print is matte paper and have it turned off.  I think it has something to do with Epson's ink waste while cleaning the heads.  

That being said, the prints look great, but no where close to the large format printers.
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SUE H
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« Reply #7 on: January 19, 2007, 03:24:25 PM »
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I've been using the 1800 for quick prints a lot, and let me tell you, it is a an ink HOG.  If you do more than a few prints at a time, then by all means, go for something with bigger cartridges.  Also, you'd be amazed how often you'll have to buy the GLOP cartridges when all you print is matte paper and have it turned off.  I think it has something to do with Epson's ink waste while cleaning the heads. 

That being said, the prints look great, but no where close to the large format printers.
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Thanks for reply so what you recommend me to go for? 300 is my budget. Do you think Epson are the best printers? buying an R1800 seems like going back 2 years in technology really have you heard any feedback on the new 1400? or do you recommend pigment inks too ? Sue
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John Moody
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« Reply #8 on: January 31, 2007, 05:15:11 AM »
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Thanks for reply so what you recommend me to go for? 300 is my budget. Do you think Epson are the best printers? buying an R1800 seems like going back 2 years in technology really have you heard any feedback on the new 1400? or do you recommend pigment inks too ? Sue
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Since you do not sell, the Claria ink is just fine.
Claria can not do B/W, it only has one black ink.
I would get the Claria over the 1800 for it's saturated colors and super resolution.  When you give someone a glossy 4x6 claria print, they think it's a "real" photo, not an "inkjet"; you don't see any dots.

I would put the choice as 2400 vs claria, with the big difference that 2400 can do B/W.

Given that the budget won't allow the 2400, I would go with the Claria.  The ink cost will be more than you are used to with your current printer.
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DarkPenguin
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« Reply #9 on: January 31, 2007, 09:30:54 AM »
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No love for the HP9180 or Canon i9000?
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danbachmann
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« Reply #10 on: December 25, 2008, 04:16:06 PM »
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Quote from: John Moody
Since you do not sell, the Claria ink is just fine.

Hi John,

I'm just curious why you don't see Epson Claria ink prints suitable for selling?
BTW, I was surprised to learn that the prints on Fuji crystal archive from the big print houses only have a rated life of 40 years (where Claria is 70-98 and the pigments are near 200).
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