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Author Topic: Marrakech article  (Read 12173 times)
John Camp
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« on: January 21, 2007, 09:13:00 PM »
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Interesting article. Markets are always fascinating -- even the ones in London.

About the M8 switch, I just got mine back from Solms with The Fixes. I complained about the switch in November, that it moved too easily, and when I didn't intend it to move, and found that a variety of people had different experiences. Some said it was fine, others agreed it was too loose. When I got the camera back, I found the repair people had tightened the switch up quite a bit; it now *clicks* into each stop, and does not move unless you want it to.

JC
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Nemo
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« Reply #1 on: January 22, 2007, 10:16:10 AM »
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Reichmann's article is a great reading, and the photographs are great.
I also found the power switch problem in my camera.
« Last Edit: January 22, 2007, 10:52:01 AM by Nemo » Logged
rvanr
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« Reply #2 on: January 22, 2007, 04:58:33 PM »
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I agree that Marrakech is a very attractive destination for photographers. I just hope the old part of town manages to retain its 'mystery' and avoids becoming westernised by the influx of tourists.

I was there in December 2005 and you can find an article on my website here.
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Sune Wendelboe
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« Reply #3 on: January 23, 2007, 03:06:47 PM »
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It's good writing and good photos.

Marrakech is indeed an anachrinistic medieval bubble drifting in time. Wonder when it'll burst. For now it's thriving, I was there in November 06 and spent many mornings taking these photos in the alleys:

http://www.globalphotographic.net/MoroccoPreview.htm

Sincerely
Sune, Copenhagen
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wolfnowl
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« Reply #4 on: January 24, 2007, 12:39:30 AM »
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I was there in November 06 and spent many mornings taking these photos in the alleys

Beautiful work; thanks for sharing!  You may wish to change the title on the page, though, as it says 'Patagonia Preview'.  Wrong continent!

Mike.
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macgyver
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« Reply #5 on: January 25, 2007, 09:41:54 AM »
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I also enjoyed the article greatly.  It's a welcome bit of relief from all the senselessly technical discussions going on here nowadays.  Thanks!
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Brian Gilkes
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« Reply #6 on: January 25, 2007, 02:06:48 PM »
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Good stuff!
I hope viewers of Sune's Morocco work check out the link "Buy a print" at the bottom of the page, to view a more eclectic collection. If I could be allowed to add a small criticism to this excellent work i would like to see the names of the people that feature in portraits. It signifies a respect that we often have , but may not give when we "take" a photograph.
I know where Macgyver is coming from, but many of us find the technical discussions very enjoyable. Like it or not , photography is a science and an art. In this is one of it's fascinations.
Photography transcends its facility as a recording mechanism at the interface of physics , philosophy and aesthetics. In this rare melding is a contact with the sublime. Technical discussions thus are not senseless. Unfortunately there are not many references to this sort of thinking. Minor White was an initiator for me from photography  and a little book by Werner Heisenberg, "Physics and Beyond, Encounters and Conversations". If anyone wants something really challenging , I would suggest "Dialogues on Perception"by the brilliant Bela Julesz.
There is more but it's place would be in another thread.
Cheers,
Brian
www.pharoseditions.com.au
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Ray
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« Reply #7 on: January 26, 2007, 01:04:44 AM »
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Good stuff!
I hope viewers of Sune's Morocco work check out the link "Buy a print" at the bottom of the page, to view a more eclectic collection. If I could be allowed to add a small criticism to this excellent work i would like to see the names of the people that feature in portraits. It signifies a respect that we often have , but may not give when we "take" a photograph.
I know where Macgyver is coming from, but many of us find the technical discussions very enjoyable. Like it or not , photography is a science and an art. In this is one of it's fascinations.
Photography transcends its facility as a recording mechanism at the interface of physics , philosophy and aesthetics. In this rare melding is a contact with the sublime. Technical discussions thus are not senseless. Unfortunately there are not many references to this sort of thinking. Minor White was an initiator for me from photography  and a little book by Werner Heisenberg, "Physics and Beyond, Encounters and Conversations". If anyone wants something really challenging , I would suggest "Dialogues on Perception"by the brilliant Bela Julesz.
There is more but it's place would be in another thread.
Cheers,
Brian
www.pharoseditions.com.au
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I couldn't agree more. Photography has a technical side which has to be mastered. If someone is suffering from 'technophobia' then they should recogise it as such, and take remedial action.

The Marrakech report from Michael, as well as Sune's work, is interesting. I see that Michael is heading more towards the 'subtraction' process. Keep it as simple as possible. Sune's photos tend to emphasise lens quality and sharp beards in contrast with fuzzy noses and ears, and of course dazzlingly sharp patterns in the sand.

Ultimately, when all is said and done, I have to ask myself, 'Would I like to hang any of these prints on my wall?'

Michael's images are of a 'general' nature, have a certain mystery and an appealing simplicity. Sune's are much more 'in your face'. One is impressed with the technical quality (he probably used an 85/1.2 lens) but there's also a sense of ugliness there. I don't think I want one of those wizend, wrinkled faces permanently on my wall.

Just my honest impression   .
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John Camp
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« Reply #8 on: January 26, 2007, 11:30:41 PM »
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Here's some Marrakech photos from a Russian guy: click on the heading that looks like mapokko.

http://photo.designproject.com/

JC
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Brian Gilkes
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« Reply #9 on: January 27, 2007, 04:36:14 PM »
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It's worthwhile looking at the rest of the site too.
Cheers
Brian
www.pharoseditions.com.au
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Ray
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« Reply #10 on: January 27, 2007, 07:12:57 PM »
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Here's some Marrakech photos from a Russian guy: click on the heading that looks like mapokko.

http://photo.designproject.com/

JC
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There are some interesting, striking and powerful images there. Well worth looking at. Some better than others of course, as will always be the case because this is a subjective process.

But one thing that strikes me, looking at these images of Morrocco and Marrakech; everyone seems to be just sitting around, doing nothing.

There was an exception in the 35 or so shots from the Russion photographer. Image 31, as I recall, is a shot of an old, overweight guy knitting. A good sign of at least some activity.  
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Brian Gilkes
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« Reply #11 on: January 28, 2007, 02:43:02 PM »
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Ray,
I'd have to agree with some reservation.
The people shots by Serge Danyshevsky fall into a portrait genre and are not documentary. Mona Lisa was not doing much . That said there is a sameness about the portraits. They are a little too homogenised for my liking.
What I liked about Danyshevsky's work was the observation of light in the landscapes- particularly the Canada stuff, and his technical ability to hold dynamic range- just look at his clouds.
Cheers
Brian
www.pharoseditions.com.au
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wolfnowl
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« Reply #12 on: January 30, 2007, 02:27:06 PM »
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Stumbled across another Marocco gallery this morning (shot coincidentally with a Leica) here.

Mike.
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Rob C
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« Reply #13 on: January 31, 2007, 11:15:26 AM »
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Humour of the unintentional variety is available, even here on LuLa.

I was having a cup of coffee this morning with my wife and we were chatting, thinking about some shoots we'd done together in the past, when I thought I'd broach the subject of Michael and his Marrakech trip.

I got as far as saying: 'that chap who runs LuLa, Michael, he's just been on holiday with his new Leica -' when she almost spilled her coffee with laughter. On my trying to find out what had inspired the burst of nervous mirth she sobbed out that she'd thought that I'd been going to say 'with his new wife' and the mental picture of this Michael sitting in his airplane seat with his new Leica beside him had just been too much to bear...

Oh well, women.

Ciao - Rob C
« Last Edit: January 31, 2007, 11:16:03 AM by Rob C » Logged

ceyman
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« Reply #14 on: January 31, 2007, 07:38:17 PM »
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Stumbled across another Marocco gallery this morning (shot coincidentally with a Leica) here.

What incredible pictures!  The man must be invisible
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wakeboy
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« Reply #15 on: February 01, 2007, 04:01:43 AM »
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i went to Marrakesh when i was 20 about 8-9 years ago, unfortunately i only had a compact camera and 1 film, but i got quite a few images, however i dont have the negs anymore! duh.... so cant scan negs in, i would probably confirm after travelling all over it that those people sitting around are the same ones that were sat there when i went....    Morocco is hot, slow plus add kif and you have the ability to sit around, one thing though that is not shown is modern Morocco, if you truly wanted an accurate picture, then how about the air con buses in Marrakesh, how about the satellite dishes everywhere, and the Porsce 911 i saw parked on the street and all the coca cola signs, the main problem i have with Morocco photography is that it always tries to show it as old fashioned and biblical in nature, which in part it is but not the whole part, i went to an internet cafe and checked my email back in 1999 there, that's not old fashioned...

Infact i had my mobile telephone with me and when i was leaving the desert from a place called Erfurt, i was what seemed in the middle of nowhere i switched on my phone and got a signal, so i called my late father at work in the uk... I dont see that side of morroco portrayed in any photos which in my opinion misses the point, to be an accurate description it needs to show all sides of life which so far most of the photos have not. Yes it looks like that, but it also is modern at the same time so historical documentary photography i would say most of these don't come close... Record what is there not what you want your photos to look like? That is the problem with lots of photographers who come from the west they take pictures of "history,"  when infact they are taking pictures of what they don't have at home.

I would like to see some pictures by a Moroccan in our countries, i wonder what he would focus on? The poverty or the opulence? Most photos are nice for what they are but they are by no means an accurate description of what is there, which it seems is what most people miss.  

Infact if you look at editorial photos on a stock website you will see a more accurate representation of reality, 90 percent are not artistic by most standards but they portray what is there, and if you go back 20 years, and look what they did then photos sometime start to come alive. We should stop trying to make history in the present by trying to make the present look like the past.
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michael
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« Reply #16 on: February 01, 2007, 05:41:20 AM »
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I won't take this comment as "aimed" at me, but I'll make the following observation.

Photography has many faces. It all depends on the photographer's purpose and interests.

Yes, Marrakesh, like almost everywhere in the so-called third world today has two faces the ancient and the modern. I've decribed it as having "snake charmers with cell phone". The same is true of Bangladesh and Tanzania, two other countries stradling the divide, which I've photographed in during the past two years.

If one is going to such countries to document the transition, or to try and provide insights into the current style of life, then fine show the satelite dishes and mobile phones. But, and it's a big but, if one simply wants to create images that show others a world that is rapidly disappearing, that is exotic, that is  mysterious, that is compelling and intruiging, then do so.

There are no "shoulds". There is simply art.

Michael
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David Hufford
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« Reply #17 on: February 01, 2007, 07:31:55 AM »
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I have similar feelings about how Japan is often portrayed. One would think that it is either full of ancient temples and geisha, or some weird neon lighted country that looks like something from the old "Jetsons" cartoon. So I generally make an effort to avoid any of the stereotypical subjects when I am taking photos around Tokyo or nearly anywhere else in the country.

But the fact is, most people aren't really interested in a documentary about Japan as it really is--very un-mysterious, modern, and quite boring in many ways. Most are interested in the exotic, the traditional, and things that show Japan as different. I have some photos on the web and the ones which show temples, geisha, or some other stereotypical, traditional view of Japan almost always get more hits or downloads than those not readily associated with it.

It is probably the same everywhere. I know if I went back to the States, to say, Montana, and had a choice of photographing a guy in a Mercedes wearing a suit in downtown Billings, and a guy in jeans and boots on his horse chasing cattle (could I even find such a guy) in most cases I'd go for the guy chasing cattle, even though it wouldn't really represent modern Montana, unless it has changed a lot since I left...






Quote
i went to Marrakesh when i was 20 about 8-9 years ago, unfortunately i only had a compact camera and 1 film, but i got quite a few images, however i dont have the negs anymore! duh.... so cant scan negs in, i would probably confirm after travelling all over it that those people sitting around are the same ones that were sat there when i went....    Morocco is hot, slow plus add kif and you have the ability to sit around, one thing though that is not shown is modern Morocco, if you truly wanted an accurate picture, then how about the air con buses in Marrakesh, how about the satellite dishes everywhere, and the Porsce 911 i saw parked on the street and all the coca cola signs, the main problem i have with Morocco photography is that it always tries to show it as old fashioned and biblical in nature, which in part it is but not the whole part, i went to an internet cafe and checked my email back in 1999 there, that's not old fashioned...

Infact i had my mobile telephone with me and when i was leaving the desert from a place called Erfurt, i was what seemed in the middle of nowhere i switched on my phone and got a signal, so i called my late father at work in the uk... I dont see that side of morroco portrayed in any photos which in my opinion misses the point, to be an accurate description it needs to show all sides of life which so far most of the photos have not. Yes it looks like that, but it also is modern at the same time so historical documentary photography i would say most of these don't come close... Record what is there not what you want your photos to look like? That is the problem with lots of photographers who come from the west they take pictures of "history,"  when infact they are taking pictures of what they don't have at home.

I would like to see some pictures by a Moroccan in our countries, i wonder what he would focus on? The poverty or the opulence? Most photos are nice for what they are but they are by no means an accurate description of what is there, which it seems is what most people miss.   

Infact if you look at editorial photos on a stock website you will see a more accurate representation of reality, 90 percent are not artistic by most standards but they portray what is there, and if you go back 20 years, and look what they did then photos sometime start to come alive. We should stop trying to make history in the present by trying to make the present look like the past.
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« Reply #18 on: February 01, 2007, 08:44:36 AM »
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There was no aiming intended! I should have worded it better, as i personally can not fault any image from Morocco i have seen by any photographer in this thread from a thats nice point of view, i was mearlly gibing at the idea of photographing places one doesn't normally go to or see from ones point of view , really, after looking at a photography book yesterday from a Pairis  photographer over the years i saw photos that to him at the time were probably not spectacular but today look very interesting, and  was trying to bring up the point that some of us try to emulate that feeling we get when looking at older stuff with modern stuff as if it was taken a while ago, if you get my drift?

 Maybe im saying photography should be looked at in a fashion that yes the guy in the suit and Mercedes looks boring now, but what about in 20-30-40 years he may be interesting yet we didn't record it? To me and i thank my art teacher from school for this, i felt i had stumbled upon a cliche' that maybe at times i was trying to emulate, but which doesn't do justice to the place one is in. And yet i am seeing it reproduced quite a bit, (yet not detracting from the quality of the photos that have been taken.) Sorry if it wasn't that clear.... maybe i should go there and see what i get, and see if i am guilty of this paradigm of thinking. The question i suppose in my head was that after looking at this book what made it stand up as a fine piece of work nearly 30 years later and will our work, as discussed before, stand up in the same way?

hope that's clearer?
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John Camp
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« Reply #19 on: February 01, 2007, 09:51:51 AM »
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An interesting exchange.

And it's not only true of the old world. There's a disappearing culture in the American midwest that is farm based, and includes activities like hunting and trapping, and commercial river fishing (for carp.) I would find it fascinating if somebody were to try to honestly document these things, but nobody really does -- there's always an implied agenda somewhere. The stock viewpoints are those of a vegetarian tree-hugger who suffers for the poor animals, or the kill-anything-that-moves semi-pro hunter with 9 million dollars worth of the latest gear. Don't see much about the farmer out with his one-and-only twelve guage picking up a couple of pheasants, and not much caring whether he shoots anything or not, but is basically out just enjoying his land; or a kid trapping muskrats because he lives in a small jobless town and it's the only way he can get money for an iPod. It is a sincere and long-standing life style, and it is going away, and there really isn't anybody documenting it whose agenda is sincere/artistic/historical rather than political.

JC
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