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Author Topic: b9180 or iPF500 for digital negatives?  (Read 1967 times)
colinb
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« on: January 29, 2007, 08:05:41 AM »
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I'm interested [ in the most vague and fecklessly confused way possible ] in dabbling with digital negatives to create largish contact prints. [if this is thoroughly confusing to you, the idea is that rather than printing out the final image, one generates a negative of the picture and prints that on transparent film in the size of the desired film - this allows the creation of platinum/palladium prints from a digital original]

The main man for this sort of thing would appear to be Dan Burkholder but he focuses on using Epson printers. Does anyone here have relevant experience with a HP or Canon?

thanks

c
« Last Edit: January 29, 2007, 08:05:57 AM by colinb » Logged
naisan
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« Reply #1 on: February 02, 2007, 10:34:48 PM »
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Quote
I'm interested [ in the most vague and fecklessly confused way possible ] in dabbling with digital negatives to create largish contact prints. [if this is thoroughly confusing to you, the idea is that rather than printing out the final image, one generates a negative of the picture and prints that on transparent film in the size of the desired film - this allows the creation of platinum/palladium prints from a digital original]

The main man for this sort of thing would appear to be Dan Burkholder but he focuses on using Epson printers. Does anyone here have relevant experience with a HP or Canon?

thanks

c
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OK - I am going, in a similarly vague and fecklessly confused manner, to attempt to confuse you further.

Some would argue that the Dmax of printers like the Canon 12-inkers can surpass platinum/palladium capabilities, so why would you do this (play with chemicals) other than liking to smell funny after years of not smelling funny. In fact, in our Orwellian times, if you frequently travel by plane, you could end up explaining to a lot of TSA officials why you like to play with chemicals. Think twice before going up against "the machine" purely for the sake of art my friend. . . think twice and maybe three times.

Now, as to your question regarding the usage of non-Epson printers for this strange endeavor: allow me to reassure you that such a thing is possible. Certainly possible. Likely the excellent darks of the later printers, when expressed as a negative, would translate to very fine gradations in your high-tones in the positive, so all the research of the printer-makers have invested in those fine darks would end up giving you something that all modern the printers are, almost indistinguishably, very good at today, which is great gradation in light tones.

I would suggest that the more technical on this board now have a lengthy discussion about the loss of bit depth with the additional flips between black and white and back to black again.

I hope if you're not mollified you're at least amused.

Naisan
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colinb
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« Reply #2 on: February 06, 2007, 07:59:15 AM »
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Hi Naisan. In a Woosterish way, I find myself filled to the b. with excellent information. Thanks for answering. Would it make it any less perverse if I mentioned that several years ago I saw some quite amazing carbon prints in the house of an 8x10 fiend in Los Angeles. Now that's an alternative process! I wonder if I could persuade an inkjet to print onto carbon impregnated gelatin coated paper...

c
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