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Author Topic: Large Format Film  (Read 26522 times)
borzynd
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« Reply #40 on: March 08, 2007, 08:45:15 AM »
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Since you mentioned the use of stitching, I am guessing that ou may be doing panoramas semi-frequently.  One reason for the purchase of a 5x7 vs 4x5 is the use of a 120/220 617 panorama back, such as made by Canham.  I currently use a Zone VI 4x5, but am looking at the purchase of a 5x7 with a 4x5 reducing back specifically to be able to shoot panoramas.  I feel this gives me the best of all worlds - quickloads and film availability in 4x5,  the occasional superlarge 5x7 shot, and the ability to do 617.

It is a consideration.

Dan Borzynski
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AJSJones
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« Reply #41 on: March 08, 2007, 07:02:08 PM »
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One additional thing to think about is the possibility of a 4x5 with back-cross movement. (L or R Shift or rise/fall depending on which way round the back is attached    )  

I have an Ebony that allows me to use 2 4x5's to make a 4x10 - developed together and scanned together, no (or very little) adjustment was needed to levels and the like and in Photoshop, it was just copy/paste - no "stitching" needed.  Just a reasonably powerful computer and lots of RAM - aligning one 600MB layer over another is not snappy  

I understand that you have issues with water and tree movement etc in panos so this might not fly for you.  However, for me a little careful freehand selection at the overlap can make an invisible seam and totally conceal where you have selected one image in preference over the other because of a motion issue.  

For me the appeal of Readyloads was major.  I have tended to do 4x10  rather than 5x8 with this approach, simply because my printer is only 24" wide and I can't reap the benefit of the 5x8 over a cropped 4x5.

The back-cross option is one I use as frequently as I suspect you'd use 5x7 after comparing 5x7 filmhoders and ReadyLoads  for a while  

Andy
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marcmccalmont
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« Reply #42 on: March 09, 2007, 08:27:54 PM »
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I ended up finding a Walker 5x7 with a 4x5 back (what I really wanted) on ebay so I'm starting to collect the pieces I need. I had also bid on a restored Burke and James 5x7 w/4x5 back before the walker was listed and won so if anyone is interested in the B&J I just want the $750 I paid for it.
Marc
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Marc McCalmont
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« Reply #43 on: March 14, 2007, 09:44:49 PM »
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I use Large Format. Try it.

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st326
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« Reply #44 on: March 20, 2007, 01:48:35 PM »
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Though they are mostly known for art repro, it's worth mentioning the Better Light scan backs. I have one and use it regularly for landscape photography and get excellent results. I use mine with a Cambo Legend monorail 4x5, which is a bit big and heavy (it was cheap and is very solid) but works extremely well.
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