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Author Topic: Landscape lighting photography  (Read 2483 times)
Sageman
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« on: June 10, 2004, 08:54:07 PM »
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[font color=\'#32CD32\']Steve,

Your post caught my interest because I am a retired custom home builder and an advanced amateur photographer, currently shooting exclusively digital. I admit that I only scanned the article, but I didn't immediately see anything about the use of a tripod for low light night photography. If it's there, then please ignore that comment. Eventhough you shoot medium format I think it's comparing apples to oranges when comparing it to a consumer / prosumer digital camera. Also, I think it unnecessarily complicates the information when you even bring up medium format in an article targeted for contractors, etc. who are probably overwhelmed with the basic information regarding night photography to begin with. Lastly, contractors are starved for time, like everyone else, so consider an outline of the most salient points at the end of the article so they can refer to these points months later without havong to re-read the entire article. I find the article and information interesting and of value for anyone owning a camera. You have a good article that could get your company exposure in several builder magazines, as well as an adapted version for Realtor magazines on taking photos of houses at dusk to dramatize listing fact sheets.

Bob Michaels
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howard smith
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« Reply #1 on: June 11, 2004, 07:55:46 AM »
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[font color=\'#000000\']Read the article.  Good job.  The photos were well done too.

To reduce the bracketing problems with film and the time lag to results, I use Poaroid film for proofs.  Type 55 is a B&W positive/negative film that can be used to check exposure and focus.  The negative can be easily processed and used for prints also.  I'm pretty sure you can get a Polaroid back for you Mamiya.

Shadow detail can be increased by pre-flashing the transparency film.  I have found this easier to do in the camera when I am ready to take the photo.

The effects of the outdoor lights (and indoor lights too) cn be controlled if you turn them on and off during the exposure.  Then the entire house and the lights do not have to have the same exposure time.  I have also put lights on reistats to control their brightness.  That can also change their color, but sometimes a little warmer doesn't hurt.

The use of a 4x5 camera would help with perspective control of the houses.[/font]
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steve-parrott
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« Reply #2 on: June 10, 2004, 05:31:41 PM »
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[font color=\'#000000\']I've been focusing on Landscape Lighting photo projects. These are houses and properties with low-voltage lighting fixtures. I've been fairly successful, but am still struggling with getting the exposure right without having to bracket like crazy.

I'm using a Mamiya RZ67 Pro with 120 back. But am also interested in tips from you digital pros.

Also, if you have time, please read an article I wrote on the subject and provide any feedback (brutal is fine).

Here's the article link: CAST Lighting Landscape Lighting Photography[/font]
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steve-parrott
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« Reply #3 on: June 11, 2004, 07:37:46 AM »
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[font color=\'#000000\']Thanks Bob, good suggestions.[/font]
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howard smith
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« Reply #4 on: June 11, 2004, 11:26:04 AM »
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[font color=\'#000000\']Forgot.  You might consider a "port-a-bush" to cover unwanted but immovable things, like fire hydrants.  Evergreen ones are nice for ugly winter landscapes that need something alive.  Some extra flowers can be a nice touch.  Stop by a local nursery.  They will likely let you return them when you are done.

Other minor landscape modifying tools like tape, string and pruning shears (with permission) are nice.  Some folks will actually welcome a yard cleanup in return for using their house.  A nice print for them is usually appreciated.

Water down a drive way or side walk.  It will reflect light and help rid the scene of a big colorless area.

Sheets of neutral density film can be useful.  Cut to shape, they can dim lights you have no control over, like street lights.  May need a ladder.[/font]
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