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Author Topic: GND filters  (Read 5887 times)
jnaneshwars
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« on: March 05, 2007, 03:34:18 PM »
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I use a Sigma 10-20mm wide angle lens for landscape photography. I was suggested to use a GND filter by some 'photography' friends. I'd like to know more about it. I read there are a couple of models and what to ask for when buying one. I'd appreciate if anyone could throw more light on it and recommend one.
Thanks.
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situgrrl
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« Reply #1 on: March 07, 2007, 08:55:21 AM »
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Since no one else has chimed in, I'll do my best.

GND stands for Graduated Neutral Density.  Mainly they are used in landscape photography to tame skys and prevent blown highlights.  With the move to digital, they are to my mind redundant - better results can more easily be had by bracketing a shot and blending in photoshop either using masks or the HDR function.

A polarising filter on the other hand is seriously useful - they cut reflections and saturate colours.  On a lens as wide as a 10-20 though, you need to be aware that you won't get an even effect.  You'll need someone more scientific than me to explain why.  Nonetheless, I often use one on my 10-20.
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francois
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« Reply #2 on: March 07, 2007, 09:31:14 AM »
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In addition to situgrrl's post you may want to read this article and watch this short video clip.
« Last Edit: March 07, 2007, 09:33:40 AM by francois » Logged

Francois
pulpmojo
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« Reply #3 on: March 19, 2007, 12:52:06 AM »
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If you're going to get yourself a GND filter, I would recommend the Cokin, their not the top of the line filters but they're relatively inexpensive and they get the job done. The most expensive thing about the Cokin system is the dang adapter rings, but you can get around that by just holding the filter with your hand while you snap your picture. It's true you can duplicate the effects with a digital camera but if you decide to do it the old fashioned way, the GND filter is the way to go, here's an example of one of my shots using Velvia 50, 20mm lens and a GND filter...

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Salvador Ayala - professional photographer - Ayala Wedding Photography in San Diego
Jeff-Grant
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« Reply #4 on: March 19, 2007, 07:10:37 AM »
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Quote
Since no one else has chimed in, I'll do my best.

GND stands for Graduated Neutral Density.  Mainly they are used in landscape photography to tame skys and prevent blown highlights.  With the move to digital, they are to my mind redundant - better results can more easily be had by bracketing a shot and blending in photoshop either using masks or the HDR function.

[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=105231\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
I still use grads on a regular basis. In New Zealand last year I used a 2 stop soft for many shots taken during the day. It worked very well taming a too hot sky. The Lee 2 stop soft is very forgiving on placement.

I would hate to have had to blend that many shots.
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jnaneshwars
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« Reply #5 on: March 19, 2007, 07:50:36 AM »
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If you're going to get yourself a GND filter, I would recommend the Cokin, their not the top of the line filters but they're relatively inexpensive and they get the job done. The most expensive thing about the Cokin system is the dang adapter rings, but you can get around that by just holding the filter with your hand while you snap your picture. It's true you can duplicate the effects with a digital camera but if you decide to do it the old fashioned way, the GND filter is the way to go, here's an example of one of my shots using Velvia 50, 20mm lens and a GND filter...


[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=107400\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Wise use of filter without the adapters. That was a nice shot. Looks great!
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joedecker
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« Reply #6 on: March 19, 2007, 10:32:54 AM »
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Wise use of filter without the adapters. That was a nice shot. Looks great!

I do that now and again, but in fairness, it can get tricky to hold the filter, the cable release and work the depth of field preview at the same time.  (There's an image of me doing just that on my site here: http://www.rockslidephoto.com//about.html ), which demonstrates how this can get out of hand quickly.

--Joe
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Joe Decker
Rock Slide Photography
http://www.rockslidephoto.com/
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