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Author Topic: Canon Polarizer 77mm  (Read 3719 times)
trops
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« on: March 06, 2007, 05:18:42 PM »
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Has anyone else experienced smearing problems when attempting to clean the Canon 77mm circular polarizer?

I have no problems with my Hasselblad or Canon lenses or with other filters and am very fastidious and careful with how I handle and maintain my lenses.

However, I am having the most unusual problems with this polarizer. No matter what I use -- microfiber or Kodak lens cleaning tissue -- in the most careful manner and with the lightest touch to remove dust (after first blowing off the dust with a handheld squeeze bulb) I seem to get smears which only get worse the more I continue to clean.

I have taken it to Canon and they were able to clean it for me about 6 months ago, but it has gotten to that point again and I am about to take it in again.

Seems ridiculous to have to take a polarizer in for this reason but I am out of ideas.

Again, in over 25 years I have never had this problem and in fact I try to adhere to the advice to use the least intrusive methods before resorting to things like using cleaning fluid etc. (by the way, I DID resort to using Kodak cleaning fluid - a few drops on the microfiber not on the filter itself) and even that did not work. I do not have this problem with any other lens or filters.  

Do polarizers have a certain inherent glaze on their surface or do I likely have some sort of mysterious "gop" on my filter?
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howiesmith
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« Reply #1 on: March 06, 2007, 05:43:06 PM »
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Never had this problem but some polarizing filters have a lubricant on the moving part.  Perhaps Canon does too and some is getting onto the glass.  Just a guess.
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Paul Kay
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« Reply #2 on: March 07, 2007, 09:04:18 AM »
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I can't keep marks off a Canon 77mm Circular Poolariser either - I've resorted to buying a B&W which doesn't seem to suffer the problem. I have found that Canon filters mark easily in general whilst the hard coated B&W don't. I work in the marine environment a lot though and wonder if the Canon coating doesn't like salt air?
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ysengrain
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« Reply #3 on: March 07, 2007, 12:27:55 PM »
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Quote
I can't keep marks off a Canon 77mm Circular Poolariser either - I've resorted to buying a B&W which doesn't seem to suffer the problem. I have found that Canon filters mark easily in general whilst the hard coated B&W don't. I work in the marine environment a lot though and wonder if the Canon coating doesn't like salt air?
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=105234\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
I had the same problem, not with a Canon filter, but a Hoya.
I tried a simple solution. Pure water - the one you use for filling a car battery, a drop of washing up soap. 30 " in this mix. Rinse a lot. Let dry near - not too close - a heater.
It works.
« Last Edit: March 07, 2007, 12:28:39 PM by ysengrain » Logged
Greg Jenkins
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« Reply #4 on: March 07, 2007, 05:04:53 PM »
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I have heard that Formula MC is the best lens cleaner, (for filters and lenses) so I bought some from pecaproducts.com. At first I was concerned because it left a film on my lens, but I followed the instructions on the bottle and continued to polish my lens, (lightly) and sure enough it became clean and bright!
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matt4626
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« Reply #5 on: March 08, 2007, 10:43:49 AM »
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I've had the same problem with Hoya filters. Formula MC didn't work either. I ended up replaceing the filter.
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trops
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« Reply #6 on: March 30, 2007, 03:23:31 PM »
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Took my polarizer to the Canon service center and asked them to clean it for me again. They claim not to know why this is happening but said they have seen this before.
WHen I asked how they cleaned it so I could do it myself they told me they used Windex followed by "100%" alcolhol. I'm not sure where you'd get 100% alcohol.

Notes:
1. Another customer behind me at the counter said she had once inadvertently disassembled her polarizer and it was full of oil/lubricant (see howiesmith's post above under this topic)
2. At www.cleaningdigitalcameras.com while browsing their site about sensor cleaning I came across this description of how Canon cleans the sensors and it mentions Windex and 90% isopropyl alcolhol: Canon - Blower and a Kimwipe, held by tweezers. They do not like to use fluid but when necessary they use either 90% isopropyl alcohol or a 50/50 mixture of isopropyl alcohol and Windex.
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howiesmith
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« Reply #7 on: March 30, 2007, 04:11:30 PM »
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Quote
Took my polarizer to the Canon service center and asked them to clean it for me again. They claim not to know why this is happening but said they have seen this before.
WHen I asked how they cleaned it so I could do it myself they told me they used Windex followed by "100%" alcolhol. I'm not sure where you'd get 100% alcohol.

Notes:
1. Another customer behind me at the counter said she had once inadvertently disassembled her polarizer and it was full of oil/lubricant (see howiesmith's post above under this topic)
2. At www.cleaningdigitalcameras.com while browsing their site about sensor cleaning I came across this description of how Canon cleans the sensors and it mentions Windex and 90% isopropyl alcolhol: Canon - Blower and a Kimwipe, held by tweezers. They do not like to use fluid but when necessary they use either 90% isopropyl alcohol or a 50/50 mixture of isopropyl alcohol and Windex.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=109716\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

"Windex" is mostly water with alcohol and amonia added along with some water softener, coloring and perfume.  The amonia is added to make it smell like it works and the perfume to help cover up the amonia.  You can make your own, cheap.

"100%" alcohol probably means you can't drink it and it doesn't have stuff added.  Rubbing alcohol usually has glycerin added to help lube the rub.

Just make sure you have stuff that won't leave a residue when it dries (distilled water and alcohol) and use a cloth that "won't scratch" the filter.  I usually use a "glasses cleaner" made by Zeiss.  Premoistened paper wipes that "won't scratch."  Seems to work well, but I don't use them on really expensive things, like Zeiss lenses (except my glass which get replaced frequently).  Camera lenses get a shot of clean air (oil free compressed air) and a light brush dusting.  Heavy cleaning usually isn't required and gets done when I have the shutter timed and cleaned.  Filters I place in the consumable category.
« Last Edit: March 30, 2007, 04:14:24 PM by howiesmith » Logged
David R. Gurtcheff
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« Reply #8 on: March 31, 2007, 11:19:04 AM »
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Quote
Has anyone else experienced smearing problems when attempting to clean the Canon 77mm circular polarizer?

I have no problems with my Hasselblad or Canon lenses or with other filters and am very fastidious and careful with how I handle and maintain my lenses.

However, I am having the most unusual problems with this polarizer. No matter what I use -- microfiber or Kodak lens cleaning tissue -- in the most careful manner and with the lightest touch to remove dust (after first blowing off the dust with a handheld squeeze bulb) I seem to get smears which only get worse the more I continue to clean.

I have taken it to Canon and they were able to clean it for me about 6 months ago, but it has gotten to that point again and I am about to take it in again.

Seems ridiculous to have to take a polarizer in for this reason but I am out of ideas.

Again, in over 25 years I have never had this problem and in fact I try to adhere to the advice to use the least intrusive methods before resorting to things like using cleaning fluid etc. (by the way, I DID resort to using Kodak cleaning fluid - a few drops on the microfiber not on the filter itself) and even that did not work. I do not have this problem with any other lens or filters. 

Do polarizers have a certain inherent glaze on their surface or do I likely have some sort of mysterious "gop" on my filter?
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=105097\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Try "Eclipse" lens cleaner. Best lens/filter cleaner on the planet IMHO. It is essentially very refined methanol. Made by Photographic Solutions, Inc, Buzzards Bay MA. I also work almost exclusively in a marine environment, and keep UV filters on my lenses at all times. Blowing fine sand and salt air/spray necessitate filters, and mine do get crumby dirty. Eclipse works.
Dave on Long Beach Island, NJ
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tomq
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« Reply #9 on: April 04, 2007, 08:17:04 AM »
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Last week I had a problem with one of my Canon lenses, one of the expert in a tech support forum explained how to clean it. Maybe you can ask in this website, they have live chat and large range of products.
Here is the link for Canon Tech Support
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