Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: Does this work for you?  (Read 5128 times)
Ben Rubinstein
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1733


« on: March 11, 2007, 05:47:22 PM »
ReplyReply

Scots Pine in Glenelg, Highlands of Scotland, sunset time though you would never have known  ,

I was eaten to death my midgies while taking this shot as you can imagine with the damp and the greenry.

I know what I was trying to do, not sure if I got there with this picture, any comments?

p.s. I don't want it in B&W!  

Here is the link: Highland Trees
« Last Edit: March 11, 2007, 05:55:47 PM by pom » Logged

Eric Myrvaagnes
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 7854



WWW
« Reply #1 on: March 11, 2007, 06:05:29 PM »
ReplyReply

I'm a big fan of B&W, especially misty scenes like this. I think it would look great in B&W.    

But I do like the color version. Very nice balance and lilt to the trees.

I can't really see the midges, though.    

I wouldn't change a thing.
Logged

-Eric Myrvaagnes

http://myrvaagnes.com  Visit my website. New images each season.
Ben Rubinstein
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1733


« Reply #2 on: March 11, 2007, 06:31:16 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote
But I do like the color version. Very nice balance and lilt to the trees.


That was me on my knees with my 17-40L at 21mm pointed upwards. It's in scenes like this where the canon WA's start getting weak, I can't really print this bigger than 15X10" as even at f8 it just isn't as bitingly sharp as my other L zooms, at least not when I've cropped it in to about 8.5 megapixels worth...
« Last Edit: March 11, 2007, 06:33:55 PM by pom » Logged

BernardLanguillier
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 7854



WWW
« Reply #3 on: March 11, 2007, 06:43:55 PM »
ReplyReply

Hi Pom,

Interesting image, thanks for sharing!

The fog in the trees is of course nice, but what makes the image stand out IMHO is the presence of the sharp green foreground that is colometrically and geometrically detached from the monochromatic and soft upper part of the photograph.

Cheers,
Bernard
Logged

A few images online here!
Ben Rubinstein
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1733


« Reply #4 on: March 11, 2007, 07:00:12 PM »
ReplyReply

Here is another that I've dug out from my discarded folder (fed up of post processing weddings!) and worked on about 10 meters away but a slightly less overcast day! About 1/2 hour before sunset, I had literally seconds before the scene was covered in unsightly shadows as the sun dropped too low.

Glenelg view
« Last Edit: March 11, 2007, 07:02:11 PM by pom » Logged

jule
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 738


WWW
« Reply #5 on: March 11, 2007, 08:24:10 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote
Scots Pine in Glenelg, Highlands of Scotland, sunset time though you would never have known  ,

I was eaten to death my midgies while taking this shot as you can imagine with the damp and the greenry.

I know what I was trying to do, not sure if I got there with this picture, any comments?

p.s. I don't want it in B&W!   

Here is the link: Highland Trees
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=106110\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
Thanks Pom, I really like this image, especially the jusxtaposition between the green ferns and the grey tones of the fog and trees. Can't see those midgies either  
Julie
Logged

jule
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 738


WWW
« Reply #6 on: March 11, 2007, 08:29:29 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote
Here is another that I've dug out from my discarded folder (fed up of post processing weddings!) and worked on about 10 meters away but a slightly less overcast day! About 1/2 hour before sunset, I had literally seconds before the scene was covered in unsightly shadows as the sun dropped too low.

Glenelg view
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=106132\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
Pom, this one doesn't work for me at all. The image is a bit incongruous in my opinion, due to the large area of dark negative space - it just looks a bit disjointed and detached in this image. I know you do not want a B&W, but I tried to create more cohesiveness within the image by giving B&W a go, but that didn't seem to bring the image together for me either.  
Julie
Logged

BernardLanguillier
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 7854



WWW
« Reply #7 on: March 11, 2007, 08:51:42 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote
Here is another that I've dug out from my discarded folder (fed up of post processing weddings!) and worked on about 10 meters away but a slightly less overcast day! About 1/2 hour before sunset, I had literally seconds before the scene was covered in unsightly shadows as the sun dropped too low.

Glenelg view
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=106132\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Pom,

Hum, I'll have to agree with Julie on this one, the soft distant landscape seems to have been cut out in the foreground by the tree. This doesn't look very natural.

I feel that such differences in luminosity work best when:

- the main subject is hit by warm light and occupies only a relatively limited part of the image,
- there is enough detail in the rest to figure out the context.

Cheers,
Bernard
Logged

A few images online here!
OnyimBob
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 283


WWW
« Reply #8 on: March 11, 2007, 09:55:40 PM »
ReplyReply

Hi Ben!   Ditto everything Eric, Julie & Bernard have said. Mist/haze/smoke really can help lift sometimes ordinary scenes to another level, as it has here. Not always the case of course, but the transformation seems to change the aesthetic of the scene from straight representational to "inspirational??" Does that make sense, or am I just a hopeless romantic?
Cheers, Bob.
Logged

wolfnowl
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5727



WWW
« Reply #9 on: March 12, 2007, 01:29:16 AM »
ReplyReply

Hi Ben:  I'm with Bernard on the first one.  I love the mix between the softness of the trees and the grass on the bottom right.  The second one doesn't work for me at all.  The shadow is just too stark and the rest seems washed out.  As has been mentioned by others!

Mike.

P.S.  A number of years ago some Canadian Wildlife Service research scientists in the arctic bared their arms and legs and had someone run around and do counts... the final total was as many as 9000 bites a minute - enough to cause total exsanguination in about 4 hours, although you'd have been driven mad long before then.  Back in 1980 I was doing an environmental impact assessment in Quebec that centered on fast flowing streams.  Black flies lay their eggs in fast flowing streams.  On a bad day you couldn't see your pants.
Logged

If your mind is attuned to beauty, you find beauty in everything.
~ Jean Cooke ~


My Flickr site / Random Thoughts and Other Meanderings at M&M's Musings
Ben Rubinstein
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1733


« Reply #10 on: March 12, 2007, 05:43:23 AM »
ReplyReply

I did say I had been working through my discards folder! So can we agree that the first one might graduate to print and sale while the 2nd one can happily stay where it is?
Logged

Eric Myrvaagnes
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 7854



WWW
« Reply #11 on: March 12, 2007, 08:40:12 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote
I did say I had been working through my discards folder! So can we agree that the first one might graduate to print and sale while the 2nd one can happily stay where it is?
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=106216\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
Agreed.

And as for midgies, some day you might want to visit Myvatn in Iceland. Its name literally means "Midge Lake", and in summer they fill the air for about a half mile from the shores of the lake on all sides.  The nice thing about Icelandic midges is that they don't bite! But the swarms are so thick they fill your eyes, nose, ears, and mouth (if you make the mistake of opening it.) My wife and I prepared one meal in midge country by starting our little camping stove outside the rental car,  putting the canned stew in the pot, and jumping back in the car while it warmed. When it seemed likely to be hot enough I went out and retrieved the pot and jumped inside the car again. We very soon gave up and moved farther from the lake. But it is beautiful there!

Eric
Logged

-Eric Myrvaagnes

http://myrvaagnes.com  Visit my website. New images each season.
Ben Rubinstein
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1733


« Reply #12 on: March 12, 2007, 09:57:39 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote
Agreed.

And as for midgies, some day you might want to visit Myvatn in Iceland. Its name literally means "Midge Lake", and in summer they fill the air for about a half mile from the shores of the lake on all sides. The nice thing about Icelandic midges is that they don't bite! But the swarms are so thick they fill your eyes, nose, ears, and mouth (if you make the mistake of opening it.) My wife and I prepared one meal in midge country by starting our little camping stove outside the rental car, putting the canned stew in the pot, and jumping back in the car while it warmed. When it seemed likely to be hot enough I went out and retrieved the pot and jumped inside the car again. We very soon gave up and moved farther from the lake. But it is beautiful there!

Eric
[{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

I've been to Myvatn, it's where I bought a mosquito net that failed miserably in Scotland, the midges flew straight through the holes, had to buy a new one with a lot finer mesh! I actually stayed in a hotel in Myvatn for two 'nights' (it's never really night!) after a week long drive round Iceland shooting when me and my wife slept in the car. She was about 2 weeks pregnant at the time though we didn't know till a while later. I have a few pics from Iceland on my website [a href=\"http://www.bphotography.co.uk/fineart/fineart.htm]www.bphotography.co.uk/fineart/fineart.htm[/url]

Here are two pics taken out of the window of my car while waiting for a sunset in the Highlands, it was horrible!

[attachment=2083:attachment]
[attachment=2084:attachment]
« Last Edit: March 12, 2007, 10:05:49 AM by pom » Logged

Eric Myrvaagnes
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 7854



WWW
« Reply #13 on: March 12, 2007, 01:49:15 PM »
ReplyReply

Ben,

Wow! Those photos out your car window bring back memories. I didn't even think of trying to photograph the little nasties.

I like your Iceland photos and I've bookmarked your site for further exploration as soon as I have time.
Logged

-Eric Myrvaagnes

http://myrvaagnes.com  Visit my website. New images each season.
jule
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 738


WWW
« Reply #14 on: March 12, 2007, 03:01:24 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote
I did say I had been working through my discards folder! So can we agree that the first one might graduate to print and sale while the 2nd one can happily stay where it is?
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=106216\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
Yep  
Logged

Ben Rubinstein
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1733


« Reply #15 on: March 12, 2007, 03:53:23 PM »
ReplyReply

Thanks Eric, I've just had a whole bunch of medium format stuff rescaned and am working them at present so don't be surprised if some of the pictures change a bit over the next couple of days.
Logged

jule
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 738


WWW
« Reply #16 on: March 12, 2007, 04:15:25 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote
Here are two pics taken out of the window of my car while waiting for a sunset in the Highlands, it was horrible!

[attachment=2083:attachment]
[attachment=2084:attachment]
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=106255\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
I thought the flies in outback Australia after rain were a bit grim... they get in your nostrils, eyes, and in your mouth when one foolishly decides to try to eat. They have been so thick on the screen of my swag that in the middle of the night I thought the moon had been obscured by cloud - until I tapped the screen and the swarms flew and the moon was then clearly apparent in the clear sky. At least they don't bite though like midgies and mozzies.

Julie
Logged

Pages: [1]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad