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Author Topic: Why Antarctica Again?  (Read 30471 times)
CatOne
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« Reply #20 on: March 16, 2007, 11:04:32 AM »
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I wonder how much of a discount CatOne is getting on his next workshop for talking the trip up so much. Personally you could not pay me to go down there.
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You're serious?  Wow.  Different strokes I guess.  We're free to both have been math/physics majors in college, and yet have vastly different preferences on how and what to shoot.

Or maybe it's because you can't readily shoot with a 4x5 down there  
« Last Edit: March 16, 2007, 11:07:16 AM by CatOne » Logged

Petrjay
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« Reply #21 on: March 16, 2007, 01:21:49 PM »
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It looks so cool (sorry) I'd absolutely love to go there.

I had just assumed that after his last trip someone must have told Michael that he had missed his opportunity to be the first Canadian to club a baby seal in the southern hemisphere.  Hence the second trip.  (There are seals on the godless underbelly of the planet, right?  They aren't just a northern hemisphere thing, right?)
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From what I understand, there are always a few leopard seals hanging around the penguin colonies, and that anyone dumb enough to try to club one stands an excellent chance of coming home as table scraps in a plastic bag.
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cmburns
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« Reply #22 on: March 17, 2007, 03:42:36 PM »
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Forget 2nd trip I hope there's a 3rd. I think the main thing that kept me from doing the 2nd one was pics and descriptions of the Drake Passage crossing on the first trip. Lying in bed with a barf bag for a day means the photography would have to be pretty amazing. From what i've seen at various sites, this time was pretty amazing and then some. That one iceberg that had the arch and what looked like columns to it, it just bothers me that I didn't get to see that and won't get to see that, probably already melted away.
     The other factor for me is cost. I foolishly showed the pictures of this latest trip to the girlffriend and now she wants to go as well, so the cost just doubled. Even the pics of the ship layed over at 30% degrees didn't dissuade her. So here's hoping there's a 3rd expedition. Besides with global warming(mans fault or not it's happening) and the ice sheets breaking up, every trip is going to show you something new. It's not like going to Yellowstone the same week every year. Ok the penguins are the same but who cares, they're so damn cute who wouldn't want to shoot them every year or two.
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BernardLanguillier
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« Reply #23 on: March 17, 2007, 10:56:53 PM »
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My understanding is that such trips are organized on a regular basis by the operators down there.

I am not sure how photography friendly the regular trips are though.

I do personnaly not love the idea of being on a beach shooting the same subject with another 49 guys. For me it is kind of a variant of the Japanese tourist bus around the Eiffel Tower in the 80s.  

I would therefore probably prefer a regular trip even if there were a little bit fewer opportunties, but that is just me.

Cheers,
Bernard
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michael
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« Reply #24 on: March 18, 2007, 08:10:04 AM »
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There are regular tourist trips to go on, and they can be fine for photographers. The advantage of the trips that are oriented toward photography, such as the ones that I do, is that we control to some extent where the ship is and when, so that we can be at the best places for the best light. On regular cruise ships people want to sleep late, be back for afternoon tea, and such.

As for being on a beach with 40+ other photographers, that's an image based on misconception. Yes, you get off the zodiacs at one point, but then there are vast areas to explore. Other than the sensible safety rule of always being with at least one other person, which (can be fun), it is possible to completely avoid being with anyone else for long stretches of time while shooting.

And on the zodiac cruises (one of the best times for shooting) on a regular trip you'd be fighting with tourists who don't understand the needs of photographers. On my trips everyone understands how to get low on the shooting side so that others behind you can work. Also, the zodiac drivers are told how to position the boats, something that doesn't happen on a regular trip.

Finally, a trip like the ones that I organize have several photographic instructors onboard who provide lectures, print review sessions, etc, on a daily basis. These are people whose courses normally cost hundreds of dollars a day, IF they happen to come to your city.

As for crossing the Drake passage, there's no way to avoid it. It lies between South America and Antarctica and takes some 36 hours to cross. I simply regard it as the cost of admission. I've now crossed the Drake 4 times, each time I was in my bunk for most of the crossing. Not actually sick, but happier to be lying down that standing up. Some people are unaffected.

I haven't finalized the details yet, but I am talking with Quark about chartering one of their ships for January '09. This would be an extended Antarctic penninsula trip lasting about 13 days. I hope to have more details in a couple of months. It will also likely be the last Antarctic trip that I do.

Anyone wanting to be on the waitlist should drop me a line .

Michael
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BernardLanguillier
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« Reply #25 on: March 18, 2007, 08:50:33 AM »
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As for being on a beach with 40+ other photographers, that's an image based on misconception. Yes, you get off the zodiacs at one point, but then there are vast areas to explore. Other than the sensible safety rule of always being with at least one other person, which (can be fun), it is possible to completely avoid being with anyone else for long stretches of time while shooting.
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Thanks for the answer Michael.

Regards,
Bernard
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ndevlin
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« Reply #26 on: March 18, 2007, 03:22:57 PM »
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It's just that I am very suspicious of anyone who goes by a pseudonym expecially one like CatOne.
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I applaud the accuity with which you have captured the American zeitgeist.  I just hope you're kidding.

Not wanting to endure the journey there is one thing (and for the record, flying Aerolineas Argentinas is much worse than sailing the Drake), but not wanting to experience natural majesty and beauty unsurpassed on earth.....Huh?  

- N.

ps. for the record, "CatOne" is a heck of a nice guy and a good photographer.
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« Reply #27 on: March 18, 2007, 04:06:38 PM »
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ddolde, perhaps you would prefer to criticize CatOne personally in private.
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Workflow_Craig
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« Reply #28 on: March 18, 2007, 09:05:53 PM »
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It looks so cool (sorry) I'd absolutely love to go there.

I had just assumed that after his last trip someone must have told Michael that he had missed his opportunity to be the first Canadian to club a baby seal in the southern hemisphere.  Hence the second trip.  (There are seals on the godless underbelly of the planet, right?  They aren't just a northern hemisphere thing, right?)
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A couple of things.
Yes there are seals down there, they eat all kinds of Penguins even DarkPenguins.  

I would love to go there aswell as I could say I have then been to all the continents.

Cheers

     Craig

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Rob C
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« Reply #29 on: March 19, 2007, 06:37:18 AM »
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A couple of things.
Yes there are seals down there, they eat all kinds of Penguins even DarkPenguins.  

I would love to go there aswell as I could say I have then been to all the continents.

Cheers

     Craig

www.webandflo.com
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Craig, why would you particularly want to be able to say that?

Rob C
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bjanes
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« Reply #30 on: March 19, 2007, 08:02:33 AM »
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Several reasons....

It's among the most enjoyable things I've ever done (standing up).

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Oh, yes, to quote Bill Buckley: "Once on the honeymoon night is not enough"  

Bill
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Petrjay
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« Reply #31 on: March 19, 2007, 09:36:57 AM »
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Craig, why would you particularly want to be able to say that?

Rob C
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Rob, he probably just wants to be able to tell all his friends that he's been incontinent lately.
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Jay Kaplan
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« Reply #32 on: March 20, 2007, 09:23:22 PM »
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I am new to the message board so first I want to say that I've been a fan of Michael Reichmann's site, photography and the video journal for a couple years now. But I am kind of puzzled why he would go all the way back to Antarctica again for a photography workshop.
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Simple, they must be crazy. Why would anyone in their right mind want to be in an aluminium tube for 17 hours at 30,000 feet?  

Thank you but I will pass on that. Yeah, I know, different strokes for different folks but still, 17 hours in an aluminium tube?
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Mort54
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« Reply #33 on: March 20, 2007, 10:12:12 PM »
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Methinks there's just a little envy from a few of the posters on this thread. Count me among those who would give his left &*% to go on one of these trips.

Hans.
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Ray
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« Reply #34 on: March 20, 2007, 10:41:36 PM »
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My main objection to an Antartic trip would be the additional expenses of flying halfway across the world to join the 'team', (Australia has a more direct route to the Antartic), plus the very significant fact that I simply don't like cold weather. I'm used to the tropics. I don't like wearing gloves.

However, I have to say that I sorely miss the opportunity to put all those experts straight, who have been sharing their experience and knowledge on those expeditions. (Just kidding   ).
« Last Edit: March 20, 2007, 10:43:10 PM by Ray » Logged
Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #35 on: March 20, 2007, 11:44:16 PM »
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However, I have to say that I sorely miss the opportunity to put all those experts straight, who have been sharing their experience and knowledge on those expeditions. (Just kidding   ).
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I think the next Antarctic expedition should include you and Howie giving a joint presentation on chemical disposal techniques for the Antarctic.  
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-Eric Myrvaagnes

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Herkko
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« Reply #36 on: March 21, 2007, 04:35:39 AM »
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No, it's not my idea of heaven either. Frankly, reading about all the work to be done after shooting, the time spent with laptops after dinner, etc. I think folks have forgotten totally about the charms of film: you went on location, shot your brains out at the right time of day, had a shower and then retired to the fleshpots for the evening, taking your models with you if you happened to be in that line of work. I was; I'd hate to have missed it all wedded to a bloody laptop!

I cannot agree more, fortunately memory cards are nowadays logistically superb 'film'. With those prices (4 to 8GB for price of a decent dinner) I can have them with 1000's of pictures from one trip. I have by experience guts to cull out the worst reject pictures right from camera. If 10,000 exposures per trip is not enough for me then I'm propably shooting too much.

Last time, and I mean last time in my life for photography trips, I carried laptop to China in April 2005. Doing pictures at hotel room in some exotic place is the least favorite pasttime I can invent to myself. If I will find myself searching for my web-mail in India or China, no worries, I'm just having a bad nightmare..

About Antarctica: I can have five trips to tropic arranged by myself in price of one package expedition into Antarctica. Because I've been living in cold country all my life I have decided to give a go for 100 trips to warmer climates before even thinking about A  
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michael
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« Reply #37 on: March 21, 2007, 07:07:50 AM »
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Don't lose sight of the fact that on this trip we had along some of the world's leading experts on digital imaging, Photoshop, coluor management, and photography in general. Having a laptop was essential to be able to spend 20 days picking these folks brains, listening to their lectures and preacticing what was learned.

And as for shooting film, well, as the French say chauqe a son gout. It's hard for me though to image taking 200 rolls of film to Antarctica. Impossible as checked luggage and impossible as carry on. Also, why give up the superior quality of digital? Oh yes, and the several thousand cost of the film and processing would then have to tallied in as well.

Don't shoot so much? OK, if that's your want. I counted some 800 seperate shooting situations over the 20 days. You could restrict yourself to just a couple of frames per. On the other hand when a humpback whale is breaching in front of you, or a city size iceberb is flowing by the ship at sunrise, just shooting a few frames would be a bit limiting, I think.

Michael
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Rob C
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« Reply #38 on: March 21, 2007, 08:32:32 AM »
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Michael - I supose the point, really, is that these trips of yours are not 'shoots' in the pro assignment sense of the word and that the people along for the ride are taking something out of the digital process instruction, apart from just enjoying the opportunity of getting to somewhere not on the doorstep, as it were. In that sense, whether or not film relieves one of the need to spend non-shooting time in the company of a computer is neither here nor there.

You also have a point about the convenience or otherwise of film in today's travelling climate, where the terror threat has taken prime position. Even when I used to do trips there was still the problem of X-Ray and my way out was to approach the relevant consulates with my business documentation and ask them to write me a request, in their language, for my film to be hand-checked at control; this worked except for the US, where the Embasssy in London was less than helpful...

Oh well, them was the days them was!

Ciao - Rob C
« Last Edit: March 21, 2007, 01:17:05 PM by Rob C » Logged

jorgedelfino
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« Reply #39 on: March 22, 2007, 12:07:32 PM »
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Michael, if you ever come back to Antartica, do it from the Chilean side, that way not only I can join you, but also show places like; Chiloe and the "wooden churches" or the "torres del paine" national park.
Regard
jd
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