Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: « 1 [2] 3 4 5 »   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: Looking Forward to Future LLVJ Downloads  (Read 31412 times)
jgoldfarb
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1


« Reply #20 on: March 29, 2007, 10:00:37 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote
No, I'm afraid there's no turning back. We've been researching and planning this for almost 6 months, and the move is necessary. We will likely continue to publish at least another couple of DVDs, but the content will appear online weeks beforehand (maybe even longer).

Michael
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=109318\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

As a long time viewer, I will miss the DVDs. It's great to look at those small round illustrated discs to select an episode to review. Manufactured DVDs last, while burned ones don't, of course. I assume we will be losing the "DVD functionality" along the way; it would be nice to have some way to capture this for burning content to DVD for playback.

Still, to be honest, my computer is where I watch the DVDs. Loss of quality is one concern I do have. I also wonder what has become of the move towards HD? I would opt for the DVD over the downloads to get better quality, and I would opt for bigger downloads (perhaps optional) for better quality as well.

I guess I'll just place my old DVDs in the drawer with my beloved Nikon F. Just please, make sure we really get more from the new technology, not just cheaper and faster.

Keep it coming,

Jeff Goldfarb
Logged
Ben Rubinstein
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1733


« Reply #21 on: March 29, 2007, 10:00:57 AM »
ReplyReply

I must be in a serious minority who don't actually have a DVD player (or a TV for that matter) but I was happy to join the LLJV club once it became downloadable and I downloaded the Lightroom tutorial within seconds of installing Lightroom on my computer. I'm looking forward to the ability to download future editions and hopefully past ones as well.
Logged

sralser
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 38


« Reply #22 on: March 29, 2007, 10:20:45 AM »
ReplyReply

I'm not in favour of this.  Even though I watch it on my computer (we also don't have a TV), we do not have a fast internet connection.  We will remain on dialup for the forseable future (it's just another expense we can do without).  I also do not have a DVD burner.  Regrettable i will probably have to cancel my subscription when you stop DVDs, but this could change but not in the near term.

Steve
Logged
DarkPenguin
Guest
« Reply #23 on: March 29, 2007, 10:45:32 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote
I must be in a serious minority who don't actually have a DVD player (or a TV for that matter) but I was happy to join the LLJV club once it became downloadable and I downloaded the Lightroom tutorial within seconds of installing Lightroom on my computer. I'm looking forward to the ability to download future editions and hopefully past ones as well.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=109388\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Yes, well, clearly you're an anarchist.  I believe not owning a TV in the USA gets you sent to Gitmo.  I mean how else do you know what to buy?

It should be noted that I like things like the tutorials as downloads.   Without seeing a LLVJ download I've no idea what I think of that.
Logged
David Mantripp
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 687


WWW
« Reply #24 on: March 29, 2007, 11:42:29 AM »
ReplyReply

Well I look forward to seeing Issue 16 for free on YouTube.....    

Sorry, but I think this is a case of technology for the sake of technology. Surely the time between issues is more a question of the time it takes to record & edit the material, rather than the time it takes to post it ?   I thought once it went out to the duplicators, that was the end of the story ?

I'm also concerned about the quality. I though we were headed for HDTV quality DVD, not MPEG4 ?

Basically you're going to end up with a glorified video blog. Fine if that's what you want, but it seems to be strange for a photographer who strives for the best standards in equipment, printing and creativity to be going in exactly the opposite direction in video publication production standards.

I'm not saying I won't try it out, but to be honest, I can think of a whole load more reasons why this is a poor idea, both from the audience point of view and the production.
Logged

--
David Mantripp
http://www.snowhenge.net
francofit
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 142


WWW
« Reply #25 on: March 29, 2007, 11:56:30 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote
... If the decision to go to exclusively downloadable video has been made and is final, have you considered offering a DVD ISO file option for download? I realize that the files are large (4.7GB), but burning an ISO file to DVD is trivial, only takes a few minutes, and will enable you to deliver the identical content at the same high quality as you deliver today on DVD . This is an option that I could live with.
I realize that DVD ISOs are too large for some to download, so the QT files would still be required.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=109366\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
 [underline is mine]

Ditto here!
I think that's a good idea: may be with a smaller "market share" but I think that could keep part of the possible future lost buyers willing to pay for the higher quality and easy navigation mentioned by "mikealex" above.
I would be ready to pay for that option even if    it could possibly require to me a download time equal to the current average of physical mailing (about a week).
[span style=\'font-size:8pt;line-height:100%\'](of course I have a not too much fast broadband, but no time neither traffic limited)[/span]  

P.S.: thinking about it again, I fear that it (4GB) could be a problem more for the "LL" server limits than for the users line... hope that's not the case.
« Last Edit: March 29, 2007, 12:02:18 PM by francofit » Logged

Franco
Chris Sanderson
Administrator
Sr. Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1899



« Reply #26 on: March 29, 2007, 12:10:09 PM »
ReplyReply

The DVD image file for download is a very good idea and one we will pursue. There will be some minor extra cost to purchasers due to extra bandwidth.

BTW samples of the LLVJ-15 Download Video have been available for months. Just click on the LLVJ Downloads link in the navigation bar of the website. You will need to scroll down to see stills of the HiRes and iPod versions; clicking on those images will bring you to an appropriate QuickTime file.

If you are rightly sceptical about the quality and size of our Download video, I believe you will be very pleasantly surprised at the quality of the sample HiRes file; and it scales up very well indeed to larger sizes if your viewing distance is greater than a metre/3 feet

Chris S
Logged

Christopher Sanderson
The Luminous-Landscape
rdonson
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1420


WWW
« Reply #27 on: March 29, 2007, 12:20:47 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote
The DVD image file for download is a very good idea and one we will pursue. There will be some minor extra cost to purchasers due to extra bandwidth.

BTW samples of the LLVJ-15 Download Video have been available for months. Just click on the LLVJ Downloads link in the navigation bar of the website. You will need to scroll down to see stills of the HiRes and iPod versions; clicking on those images will bring you to an appropriate QuickTime file.

If you are rightly sceptical about the quality and size of our Download video, I believe you will be very pleasantly surprised at the quality of the sample HiRes file; and it scales up very well indeed to larger sizes if your viewing distance is greater than a metre/3 feet

Chris S
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=109407\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]


Ahhh...a DVD ISO file....music to my ears.  Thanks, Chris!!!

I've always looked forward to the days when my LLVJ DVD arrives and I put it into my uprezzing DVD player and watch it on my HDTV.  The quality is excellent.  While I have a good computer and monitor its no match for the HDTV.  I'm sure Chris is looking forward to the days when LLVJ is in HD natively.
Logged

[span style='font-size:14pt;line-height:100%'][span style='font-family:Arial'][span style='font-family:Geneva'][span style='font-size:8pt;line-height:100%']Regards,
Ron[/span][/span][/span][/span]
mikealex
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 42


WWW
« Reply #28 on: March 29, 2007, 01:05:48 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote
The DVD image file for download is a very good idea and one we will pursue. There will be some minor extra cost to purchasers due to extra bandwidth.
Thank-you!   That is very good news, and enough to keep me as a subscriber for a long time. I have no problem paying a little extra for the download to receive the same high quality we receive today. With that news, I will  convert the remainder of my subscription to download.
« Last Edit: March 29, 2007, 01:21:18 PM by mikealex » Logged

...Mike
Ben Rubinstein
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1733


« Reply #29 on: March 29, 2007, 01:12:26 PM »
ReplyReply

Steve, I would venture to suggest that you will not be on dial up for as long as you think given how cheap it is getting the future availability of dial up will be sure to be in question...
Logged

Eric Myrvaagnes
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 7866



WWW
« Reply #30 on: March 29, 2007, 01:23:34 PM »
ReplyReply

Add me to the list of those who will be very willing to pay extra for an ISO DVD image version.
Logged

-Eric Myrvaagnes

http://myrvaagnes.com  Visit my website. New images each season.
lbergman
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 66


« Reply #31 on: March 29, 2007, 01:46:49 PM »
ReplyReply

Unfortunately, until the ISPs (in my area at least) get realistic about the cost of high-speed internet, I'm sure a number of us are stuck with dial-up.  In my case, if DVDs were eliminated, my only option would be to D/L at work (not an ideal situation).
Logged
Ben Rubinstein
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1733


« Reply #32 on: March 29, 2007, 02:25:35 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote
Unfortunately, until the ISPs (in my area at least) get realistic about the cost of high-speed internet, I'm sure a number of us are stuck with dial-up.  In my case, if DVDs were eliminated, my only option would be to D/L at work (not an ideal situation).
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=109424\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Gosh, here in the UK there is a price war for broadband with it almost being given away with your packet of chips....
Logged

lbergman
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 66


« Reply #33 on: March 29, 2007, 02:36:08 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote
Gosh, here in the UK there is a price war for broadband with it almost being given away with your packet of chips....
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=109431\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

DSL goes for around $32/month (cheapest I've seen w/o buying a bunch of expensive service packages that you don't need), but if you want true high speed, Comcast cable is the big heavy-weight here and they still demand around $50/month. Since there doesn't appear to be any true competition yet, the providers don't feel real inclined to drop their prices.  Dial-up by contrast, can be had for $12/month, and there are still cheaper options...
Logged
61Dynamic
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1442


WWW
« Reply #34 on: March 29, 2007, 05:01:05 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote
DSL goes for around $32/month (cheapest I've seen w/o buying a bunch of expensive service packages that you don't need), but if you want true high speed, Comcast cable is the big heavy-weight here and they still demand around $50/month. Since there doesn't appear to be any true competition yet, the providers don't feel real inclined to drop their prices.  Dial-up by contrast, can be had for $12/month, and there are still cheaper options...
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=109435\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
Here in America we don't have much choice. Most areas are either monopolies or duopolies and the FCC has gone to quite some effort of making sure that happens. Most high-speed connections are 320kb/s up and 5mb down placing America in the bottom twenty in terms of countries with high-speed connections. If we had some competition we would probably be like Japan with their 100mb/s up/downn for $30 a month.

Hell, we invented the blasted internet. It only makes sense we should have the best options for connection.
Logged
Jay Kaplan
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 177


« Reply #35 on: March 30, 2007, 12:02:44 PM »
ReplyReply

I too am unhappy with the decision to send the LLVJ via download. I spend over 8 hours a day in front of a computer screen and the last thing I care to do when I come home is spend more time in front of one watching a 2 hour + video.

While I have broadband, Comcast is the local monopoly, it will still take time to download those large files. The proplem is that cable is like the old "party line" telephone connections and is subject to the number of subscripers on line at one time. This affects the download speed, the more people online the slower the speed. You don't always get the top speed and numerous trips by the service personal don't seem to cure the problem.

And no, I will not stay up to 2 in the morning to download the file.

Like others, I enjoy watching the LLVJ on my TV in the living room while reclining on the sofa. Looking at a video on my computer is just not the same no matter the subject.

It is like articles on the screen, I always print them out before trying to read, maybe it is an age thing or that I am more analog than digital but I spend too much time in front of the computer now.

If download is my only option, then I will have to reconsider renewing my subscription. The delay in getting the DVD, it generally takes about 2 weeks to arrive after shipping only increases the pleasure once the DVD arrives.
Logged
Mike Boden
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 124


WWW
« Reply #36 on: March 30, 2007, 02:49:42 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote
We have to look to the future, not the past.

[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=109318\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

If this is the case, then you need to seriously consider BluRay or HD-DVD. This is the future. As a customer, I'm willing to pay for you to create the discs for me. I really don't have the desire to spend the time downloading and creating discs. Plain and simple.

So what I don't get is this: why can't you offer both?
Logged

wolfnowl
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5727



WWW
« Reply #37 on: March 30, 2007, 03:52:47 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote
Hell, we invented the blasted internet. It only makes sense we should have the best options for connection

TCP and IP were invented by North Americans, but the World Wide Web was developed by Tim Berners-Lee, a Brit working at CERN in Geneva.

Off topic, but just keeping the record straight...

Mike.
« Last Edit: March 30, 2007, 03:53:10 PM by wolfnowl » Logged

If your mind is attuned to beauty, you find beauty in everything.
~ Jean Cooke ~


My Flickr site / Random Thoughts and Other Meanderings at M&M's Musings
61Dynamic
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1442


WWW
« Reply #38 on: March 30, 2007, 03:54:15 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote
If this is the case, then you need to seriously consider BluRay or HD-DVD. This is the future.
[{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
Neither HD DVD or Blu-Ray are the future--yet. We are still in a format war and fewer people have a player for these formats then they have internet connection and a DVD burner.

Then there is the cost. HD DVD is around 15-20% more expensive then a standard DVD to master (around $2K) since it is based off the same tech. [a href=\"http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20060316-6400.html]Image Entertainment stated[/url] Blu-Ray mastering costs at around $40K. Then there is the cost of stamping each disc. Standard DVDs are $1 a pop with Blu-Ray at $2 per. If prices have reduced significantly since then, I have yet to hear about it.

Michael would--for cost reasons--have to bet on HD DVD and hope that is the prevailing format. If not, and Blu-Ray does not come down in cost considerably the LLVJ would have to either go to internet distribution or back to DVDs leaving him at square one.

Until the format war is done, neither format is even on the radar for anyone but the movie studios.
Logged
61Dynamic
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1442


WWW
« Reply #39 on: March 30, 2007, 04:06:06 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote
TCP and IP were invented by North Americans, but the World Wide Web was developed by Tim Berners-Lee, a Brit working at CERN in Geneva.

Off topic, but just keeping the record straight...

Mike.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=109724\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
Well, if you really want to go to the beginning, it was J.C.R. Licklide. At MIT in 1962 he described the concept for a "Galactic Network." He was later hired by DARPA where the first actual network was developed for the Military called the ARPANET.
Logged
Pages: « 1 [2] 3 4 5 »   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad