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Author Topic: An X-Pan versus Nikon’s FM3a  (Read 2495 times)
tri3mast
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« on: April 01, 2007, 05:52:59 PM »
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An X-Pan versus Nikon’s FM3a

I know the only thing they have in common is that they are both 35mm film cameras

I’m in the process of reducing my inventory hopefully leaving me with one film camera in 35mm, medium and large format and possibly two DSLR’s.

I also use Canon and Yashica rangefinder camera’s but these won’t count.

The two digital cameras are or will be my Canon 20D and soon to be Fujifilm’s S5 Pro.

My problem comes with wanting a Hasselblad X-Pan to replace my Nikon FM3a.

The FM3a has the ability to operate without the need of batteries and to make exposures in “A” mode well beyond the 30 seconds as outlined in the manual.

This is no doubt due to its electronic shutter; apparently the Nikon EM will do the same.

My question to this form is does anyone know if the X-Pan will work in “A” mode beyond the 8 seconds as the Nikon FM3a does?  

This would be a deciding factor for me in the purchase of an X-Pan.

I’d say 70% of the images I make on the Nikon FM3a are 3 to 5 minutes with another 20% between 8 and 10 minutes the balance being more normal 1/60 to 1/250.

I appreciate any help on this

Thank you

Robert Taylor London Ontario
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S Fitzgibbon
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« Reply #1 on: April 03, 2007, 08:45:53 AM »
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No, the XPan does not go beyond 8 seconds in "A" mode. The Xpan II increased the max. "B" time to 540 seconds, up from a measly 30 seconds on the original version. I love using the XPan and the flexibility of format, but it does have its limitations (and came with the least informative instruction manual for a camera I've ever come across).
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tri3mast
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« Reply #2 on: April 03, 2007, 09:23:41 AM »
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No, the XPan does not go beyond 8 seconds in "A" mode. The Xpan II increased the max. "B" time to 540 seconds, up from a measly 30 seconds on the original version. I love using the XPan and the flexibility of format, but it does have its limitations (and came with the least informative instruction manual for a camera I've ever come across).
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Thanks,

I appreciate your input; the X-Pan II would be the model of choice “when” I go this route.

However after a brief chat with my photo retailer “owner” who is a Hasselblad dealer and operates a mini lab as well sort of cooled my jets on the X-Pan.

It’s a wonderful camera beautifully built and would fit into my style of landscape photography well has a couple of drawbacks that are a major downfalls.

As you say the shutter won’t work as the Nikon FM3a in the “A” mode.

I might have been able to work with that but when it came to scanning the panoramic transparencies to get true edge to edge accuracy is a “Drum” scanner that was a hit below the belt.

Our technical advances in computer software has made it possible to produce beautiful panoramic images from digital files, I hate digital sometimes.

After seeing true panoramic images made in Sedona with a Fuji G617 and Velvia I am amazed that we as photographers have let the digital invasion take over a true abilities.

One day I’ll own an X-Pan and go create some nice panoramic images, I know nowhere near the G617 but still great images.

Thanks for your input.

Robert in Canada
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John.Murray
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« Reply #3 on: April 03, 2007, 10:39:05 AM »
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Robert - Although a drum scan will give "ultimate" results, I'm getting very nice stuff from a Microtek ArtixScan 120tf MF film scanner.  There is support for X-Pan format via the Silverfast Plugin

PS:  now that LR is here I *definately* need to re-scan and adj dark foreground  
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hvk
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« Reply #4 on: April 03, 2007, 11:01:21 AM »
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No, the XPan does not go beyond 8 seconds in "A" mode. The Xpan II increased the max. "B" time to 540 seconds, up from a measly 30 seconds on the original version. I love using the XPan and the flexibility of format, but it does have its limitations (and came with the least informative instruction manual for a camera I've ever come across).
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=110395\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

The original Xpan can be modified to have a 270s "B" time. It probably needs a trip to the factory to have this done...

/Henrik
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tri3mast
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« Reply #5 on: April 03, 2007, 11:35:45 AM »
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Robert - Although a drum scan will give "ultimate" results, I'm getting very nice stuff from a Microtek ArtixScan 120tf MF film scanner.  There is support for X-Pan format via the Silverfast Plugin

PS:  now that LR is here I *definately* need to re-scan and adj dark foreground 
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John,

What did you do with your self-portrait flip the image?

Nice web site love the pictures of Oregon, Horseshoe Lake in Washington and “Cynthia w-dogs” is priceless.

Our images of Mother Earth by the sounds of it are the only legacy we’ll leave our children after listening to several scientists about Global Warming.

Okay back on topic; I’m not familiar with this scanner “Microtek ArtixScan 120tf MF film scanner” is it a flat bed?

The scanner I use just does a horrible job with 35mm anything but medium and large format it works really well.

I’d say that I get the best scan out of the medium format and really got to be hypercritical making sure the 4x5 sheet film is supported correctly or I get moiré.

So, colour me “Old Fashion” but I always like to create the image in the camera not spend time in front of a monitor stitching it together.

My film images take a lot less time to make print ready then do my digital images but like everyone else my clients dictate what they want and when they want it.

The old cliché “Speed Kills” holds true with photography as well.

Now that you have rekindled the flame of desire for an X-Pan I’ll mark that on my list right under the Fujifilm S5 Pro.

Thanks for your comments.

Robert in Canada
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John.Murray
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« Reply #6 on: April 03, 2007, 12:13:36 PM »
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The 120tf is a film scanner using a Kodak 42bit sensor - 4000dpi resolution.

Although Microtek has apparently "end of lifed" it, they have promised Windows Vista drivers sometime in August.

I bought it after attending a seminar hosted by Hasselblad and Tony Sweet - he owns one and recommended it.

http://www.microtek.nl/Product.php?Product=Detail&P_Id=92

Finally - If you do purchase an X-Pan I strongly recommend you have the lab provide the processed film *uncut*

Hope this helps  - John
« Last Edit: April 03, 2007, 12:21:02 PM by Joh.Murray » Logged

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