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Author Topic: 130NR Paper Compatability Question  (Read 2667 times)
dct123
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« on: April 03, 2007, 03:40:34 PM »
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Has anyone tried the new HP Advanced Photo Paper (Q5462A) in the Designjet 130?
If so, are the prints instant dry and as water resistant as the pigment inks are claimed to achieve in the Z series printers? What is the image quality compared to Premium Plus paper?

I just spent a couple frustrating hours on the phone with HP and no one could answer the question.

Any feedback would be appreciated.

Thanks,
D.C.
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Haraldo
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« Reply #1 on: April 04, 2007, 11:55:27 PM »
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Quote
Has anyone tried the new HP Advanced Photo Paper (Q5462A) in the Designjet 130?
If so, are the prints instant dry and as water resistant as the pigment inks are claimed to achieve in the Z series printers? What is the image quality compared to Premium Plus paper? I just spent a couple frustrating hours on the phone with HP and no one could answer the question. Any feedback would be appreciated.

HP APP is microporous-coated. Meant for pigment printers (B9180). HP DJ130 works best with swellable papers, providing protection from atmospheric contamination (but not water). But hey, give it a shot and see what happens.

Harald
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Haraldo
aka Harald Johnson
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fotostudio.nl
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« Reply #2 on: November 28, 2012, 03:17:39 AM »
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For many years I am a happy user of the designjet130 printer.
Until this summer.
I tried to order HP premium plus photo satin Paper A4 size,
but is has been replaced by : CR673A
an instant dry and water resistan version of this paper.

despite new calibration of this paper I can not make a decent print with it.
Especialy the black and dark parts are horrible.
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Ernst Dinkla
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« Reply #3 on: November 28, 2012, 10:11:13 AM »
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Some suggestions:

There is a short list of dye ink compatible inkjet media in my SpectrumViz application. Among them swellable media from Felix Schoeller and Kodak. Kodak wide format media are now distributed by BMG, address is in the paper distributor links of the SpectrumViz page.

There still are desktop dye ink printers in the Canon, HP, Epson catalogs and the better dyes; Claria, Vivera dye, Canon's (Chromolife?) should be used with compatible papers to get at least some of longevity claimed for those inks. Whether papers from the other brands can replace the HP qualities I do not know. Many CAD wide format models from HP and Canon still have at least dye inks for gloss printing, matte black ink can be pigment though, check the compatible gloss photo papers for that category of printers, from Océ as well.

For the FujiFilm, Noritsu and Epson dry minilabs a clone of the Claria dye ink is used (origin is most likely FujiFilm chemicals, even for Epson). The dry minilab printers use sheets or rolls with a maximum of 30 cm wide. Consider them at least compatible with Claria dye ink that claims better longevity than usual dye/paper combinations. So check dry minilab suppliers too for consumables. Canon has a dry minilab dye model ready but I doubt it runs anywhere now so it will be hard to get the media from that source. I got some samples on the Photokina; Canon DreamLabo qualities.

If longevity is no issue then there is quite some development happening in papers for fast web inkjet printing, matte to high gloss. Felix Schoeller and more companies. Collected some dual sided samples on the Photokina and the image quality is good. Not RC paper though. Large rolls and pallet deliveries of sheets but maybe a distributor could take the risk of confection for a smaller market.

Dye is not dead yet.

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Met vriendelijke groet, Ernst

http://www.pigment-print.com/spectralplots/spectrumviz_1.htm
490+ inkjet paper white spectral plots, November 2012:
rearranged categories, Sihl Masterclass papers added.



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MHMG
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« Reply #4 on: November 28, 2012, 11:07:14 AM »
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HP APP is microporous-coated. Meant for pigment printers (B9180). HP DJ130 works best with swellable papers, providing protection from atmospheric contamination (but not water).
Harald

Actually, HP engineered the HP advanced paper specifically for its consumer line of dye-based desktop printers not pigment based printers like the Z-series or B9180. APP presumably has additives like dye mordants and anti-oxidants to boost it's light fade and gas fade resistance for use with HP's Vivera dyes plus reduce continued dye diffusion after printing (i.e. lateral migration of the dyes that reduces sharpness and can cause ongoing color balance changes). According to Aardenburg lightfade tests, HP achieved moderate lightfastness for it's Vivera dyes/APP compatibility except for printers like the HP 8750 which also have photo gray dyes that I don't believe the Designjets use. The photo gray dyes tend to shift hue towards brown rather quickly on the APP, but the six color Vivera dye cCmMYK printers are moderately lightfast. For example, APP achieved a 29-31 Megalux hour Aardenburg Conservation display rating compared to 45-53 average Megalux hour rating for three swellable inkjet papers tested, but 29-31 Megalux hours is highly competitive result compared to traditional silver gelatin color photo processes like Fuji Crystal Archive which was perhaps likely the HP chemists' design goal for LF resistance.  See ID#'s 80-83 in the AaI&A lightfastness database to download the relevant reports if you want to visually compare the APP light fade resistance to HP Premium Plus swellable results. These tests were done with a Photosmart 7960 printer using the improved 57+ Magenta ink cartridge which I believe effectively "upgrades" the 7960 to to the same dye set HP uses in the Designjet 130.  

You'll easily find letter-size APP at office supply stores like Staples or Office Depot in the US because that is the market for it.  IMHO, APP has the look and feel of "everyday" consumer grade photo paper, and it won't print with as deep a black level as the swellable Premium Plus Photo Satin and gloss papers originally specified for the Designjet 130 printers and other HP Photosmart printers. The new instant-dry versions of HP Premium Plus will get closer to what you are used to in terms of a more professional finish and thickness, but as Fotostudio noted, HPPP instant dry will also probably cause you some image quality grief. However, I believe a custom ICC profile should bring you back to a pretty good overall result, albeit perhaps still a little dissappointing on dmax.

cheers,
Mark
http://www.aardenburg-imaging.com
« Last Edit: November 28, 2012, 11:10:09 AM by MHMG » Logged
chichornio
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« Reply #5 on: November 28, 2012, 01:30:14 PM »
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Anyone have tried this new paper from HP for the 130nr? (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/585326-REG/HP_Hewlett_Packard_Q7920A_HEW_Q7920A_Premium_Plus_Photo.html)
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fotostudio.nl
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« Reply #6 on: November 29, 2012, 02:38:33 AM »
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Thanks for all this information.

hp designjet 130nr works great with Q5491A.(roll)
This combination also has a very long durability,
I have not found a discolouration in any print,
not even with prints from 2004!

My last option ( since I can not find a suitable replacement) is to
cut a roll Q5491A to smaller sizes I need.
Concern is if smaller cuts can get flat from an 2" core roll.

I'm also searching contact with HP through my supplier,
because HP is in Europe hardly reached by mail or phone.
« Last Edit: November 29, 2012, 06:46:07 AM by fotostudio.nl » Logged

Ernst Dinkla
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« Reply #7 on: November 29, 2012, 06:28:48 AM »
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My last option ( since I can not find a suitable replacement) is to
cot a roll Q5491A to smaller sizes I need.
Concern is if smaller cuts can get flat from an 2" core roll.


Rewind the paper against the curl on another core and let it rest like that before cutting to sheets. At least 24 hours, the longer the better, till you notice the curl inwards becomes as problematic then cut the rest of the sheets.

--
Met vriendelijke groet, Ernst

http://www.pigment-print.com/spectralplots/spectrumviz_1.htm
500+ inkjet paper white spectral plots, November 2012:
rearranged categories, Sihl Masterclass papers added.
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